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What's On

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Now showing at ArtHouse Crouch End 159A,Tottenham Lane,London N8 9BT 020 8245 3099

  • Alice Through The Looking Glass
  • Love & Friendship
  • Tale Of Tales
  • The Jungle Book

Alice Through The Looking Glass 3 stars

Alice takes a tumble through a mirror and plummets into Wonderland where she reunites with the White Queen, Tweedledee and Tweedledum, Absolem the Caterpillar, The Dormouse and the White Rabbit. They reveal that the Mad Hatter is in an emotional funk because he's convinced that his family did not perish in the Jabberwocky's inferno. To set the Hatter's mind at rest, Alice agrees to steal a device called the Chronosphere from its guardian, Time.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Family, Family, Fantasy
  • CastJohnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter, Anne Hathaway, Mia Wasikowska, Sacha Baron Cohen, Rhys Ifans.
  • DirectorJames Bobin.
  • WriterLinda Woolverton.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration113 mins
  • Official sitemovies.disney.co.uk/alice-through-the-looking-glass
  • Release27/05/2016

Released in 2010, Tim Burton's descent down the rabbit hole of Alice In Wonderland was a triumph of eye-popping style and weirdness over substance. Audiences didn't care about flimsy narrative and his quixotic journey of self-discovery became the second highest grossing film that year behind Toy Story 3, with box office takings in excess of one billion US dollars. Curiouser and curiouser... That's more than one billion compelling reasons for a sequel and, lo and behold, James Bobin replaces Burton at the helm for the madcap time-travelling adventure, Alice Through The Looking Glass. Screenwriter Linda Woolverton, who adapted the first film, largely abandons Lewis Carroll's 1871 novel, introducing an eccentric new character - Time - in order to facilitate some trippy excursions through the past and present and reveal how the decapitation-happy Red Queen (Helena Bonham Carter) came to be cursed with an oversized noggin. Like its predecessor, the sequel spares no expense with the visuals, inducing eye strain, motion sickness and perhaps even the odd headache in 3D and IMAX. The paucity of characterisation is even more pronounced in this second helping, tethering much of the nonsense to Johnny Depp's wide-eyed theatrics as the Mad Hatter. Alice (Mia Wasikowska) has successfully buckled her swash as captain of her father's ship, The Wonder, but when she returns to dry land, the plucky heroine learns that her mother (Lindsay Duncan) has sold the deed to her embittered former suitor, Hamish Ascot (Leo Bill). Defiant in the face of adversity, Alice takes a tumble through a mirror and plummets into Wonderland where she reunites with the White Queen (Anne Hathaway), Tweedledee and Tweedledum (Matt Lucas), Absolem the Caterpillar (voiced by Alan Rickman), The Dormouse (Barbara Windsor) and the White Rabbit (Michael Sheen). They reveal that the Mad Hatter (Depp) is in an emotional funk because he's convinced that his family, including his milliner father Zanik (Rhys Ifans), did not perish in the Jabberwocky's inferno. To set the Hatter's mind at rest, Alice agrees to steal a device called the Chronosphere from its guardian, Time (Sacha Baron Cohen). "Do try not to break the past, present or future," advises The Cheshire Cat (Stephen Fry) as Alice slides back and forth through time to learn the startling truth. Alice Through The Looking Glass is a topsy-turvy jaunt too far for Lewis Carroll's iconic characters. Wasikowska reprises her role as the spirited adventurer who believes that "the only way to achieve the impossible, is to believe it is possible". Depp, Cohen and Bonham Carter compete to see who can scene-steal with the greatest abandon. Bobin's film feels considerably longer than 113 minutes. If only the Chronosphere was real and we could fast forward through the sentimental goo of the final section.

Love & Friendship 4 stars

Lady Susan Vernon is concerned about the rumours that have begun to circulate about her relationship with smitten suitor Lord Manwaring. She seeks refuge with her late husband's family on their vast estate. Charles Vernon is blind to Lady Susan's capacity for mayhem, but his wife, Catherine, is less trusting, especially when their house guest charms her handsome younger brother, Reginald. Complicating matters, Lady Susan must find a wealthy suitor for her daughter, Frederica, and she resolves to force a love match with Sir James Martin.

  • GenreAdaptation, Comedy, Drama, Historical/Period, Romance
  • CastJames Fleet, Xavier Samuel, Morfydd Clark, Jemma Redgrave, Kate Beckinsale, Chloe Sevigny.
  • DirectorWhit Stillman.
  • WriterWhit Stillman.
  • CountryIre/Neth/F
  • Duration92 mins
  • Official sitewww.loveandfriendshipmovie.com
  • Release27/05/2016

Bosoms heave, corsets strain and venomous one-liners land with marksman-like precision in Whit Stillman's delicious period romantic comedy, based on Jane Austen's novella Lady Susan. The acclaimed New York-born writer-director polishes a very British tale of stifled emotions and rigid etiquette to a glorious lustre. Adultery, deception and intrigue abound in the rarefied circles of the late 18th century, spun to perfection by a widow with a gift for scandalous suggestion if it emboldens her social standing or perhaps lands her a rich, old and undemanding husband. The lead character's complete lack of scruples in a world where appearances are everything and rumour can scorch a lady's reputation beyond repair is a delight to behold. She wrecks romances and undermines friendships with nary a flicker of concern for her unsuspecting victims, observing that "facts are horrid things" as she stacks one tiny fib atop another, certain that they will never fall. Stillman gifts this peach of a role to Kate Beckinsale and she savours ever acid-laced bon mot with relish. Lady Susan Vernon (Beckinsale) is concerned about the rumours that have begun to circulate about her relationship with smitten suitor Lord Manwaring (Lochlann O'Mearain). She seeks refuge with her late husband's family on their vast estate. Charles Vernon (Justin Edwards) is blind to Lady Susan's capacity for mayhem, but his wife, Catherine (Emma Greenwell), is less trusting, especially when their house guest charms her handsome younger brother, Reginald (Xavier Samuel). Needless to say, Reginald's parents (James Fleet, Jemma Redgrave) are horrified by the prospect of their son fraternising with a minx. Complicating matters, Lady Susan must find a wealthy suitor for her daughter, Frederica (Morfydd Clark), and she resolves to force a love match with Sir James Martin (Tom Bennett). Lady Susan's trusted confidante in tangled affairs of the heart is the equally unshockable Alicia Johnson (Chloe Sevigny), who has burdened herself with an older husband (Stephen Fry). "He's too old to be governable, too young to die," admonishes Lady Susan. As the scheming socialite's web of lies unravels, she must think quickly on her feet to maintain her standing with her cadre of ardent supporters. Love & Friendship is a rare tonic. Period detail and costumes are impeccable, but it is Stillman's riotous reinvention of Austen's little-known novella that glitters brightest. Beckinsale oozes butter-wouldn't-melt sweetness as she leaves desolation in her bustled wake, running rings around the male of the species by exploiting her sex's bountiful charms. Every back-handed compliment lands like a sharp slap to the chops, eliciting so much laughter in some scenes that a couple of zinging one-liners are lost in our mounting delirium. A perfect excuse to savour a second helping. It would be rude not to.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 30th May 2016
Tuesday 31st May 2016
Wednesday 1st June 2016
Thursday 2nd June 2016

This film is also showing at:

Tale Of Tales 3 stars

Fantasy.

  • GenreFantasy, Horror, Romance
  • CastSalma Hayek, Toby Jones, Vincent Cassel.
  • DirectorMatteo Garrone.
  • WriterGiambattista Basile, Edoardo Albinati.
  • CountryIta/Fr/UK
  • Duration133 mins
  • Official site

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 1st June 2016

This film is also showing at:

The Jungle Book 3 stars

A young boy called Mowgli is raised by wolves Akela and Raksha. The boy's presence in the jungle is an affront to Shere Khan, the Bengal tiger, who resolves to kill Mowgli. Thus the man cub must leave his wolf parents and embark on a perilous journey of self-discovery in the company of Bagheera the black panther and Baloo the bear. En route, Mowgli has a crushing encounter with Kaa the python and is sweet-talked by the deceptively dangerous King Louie.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Drama, Family, Family
  • CastIdris Elba, Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson, Christopher Walken, Lupita Nyong'o, Giancarlo Esposito, Sir Ben Kingsley, Neel Sethi.
  • DirectorJon Favreau.
  • WriterJustin Marks.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration106 mins
  • Official sitewww.disney.co.uk
  • Release15/04/2016

The bare necessities of a contented life will come to you by going on safari with Jon Favreau's technically dazzling romp through the stories of Rudyard Kipling. Not since James Cameron's Avatar has a 3D digital world been conjured with such depth and precision. Shot in downtown Los Angeles and beautifully rendered as untamed wilderness on computer hard drives, this immersive Jungle Book retains the wide-eyed charm of the 1967 Disney animation including three songs and comic relief from a rascally bear named Baloo, voiced to droll perfection by Bill Murray. "You have never been a more endangered species than you are now," the hirsute honey thief informs an Indian porcupine (Garry Shandling) during one amusing altercation. Vibrant colour radiates off the screen and gooey sentimentality oozes like sap during the rousing final act, but scriptwriter Justin Marks isn't afraid to hack into darker territory. Shere Khan the Bengal tiger evokes a heartbreaking scene from The Lion King in his relentless, blood-crazed pursuit of Mowgli, and the animated version's jazziest interlude - I Wan'na Be Like You with jungle VIP King Louie and his swingin' band of monkeysicians - is repurposed as a terrifying chase. Man cub Mowgli (Neel Sethi) is raised by wolves Akela (Giancarlo Esposito) and Raksha (Lupita Nyong'o) as a brother to other pups. A terrible drought necessitates an uneasy truce between predators and prey around the watering hole, and other denizens of the jungle finally get to see Mowgli close-up. The boy is an affront to Shere Khan (Idris Elba), who lost an eye to a fiery torch wielded by Mowgli's father. "A man cub becomes man, and man is forbidden!" snarls the big cat, who demands the child be handed over to him for slaughter. Akela and Raksha refuse but Mowgli acknowledges his presence jeopardises the lupine clan. So he embarks on a perilous journey back to civilisation in the company of his protector, Bagheera the black panther (Sir Ben Kingsley). En route, Mowgli gathers honey for greedy Baloo (Murray) and is pressurised into sharing the secret of "the red flower" - fire - with menacing Gigantopithecus, King Louie (Christopher Walken). The Jungle Book flexes its digital muscles in every impeccably crafted frame, festooning the screen with a menagerie of anthropomorphised critters that are just as realistic as the shipwrecked tiger in Life Of Pi. Sethi is a tad wooden in comparison but it must be difficult for a 12-year-old newcomer to find an emotional core when the rest of the cast and lush backgrounds only spring to life in post-production. Vocal performances are strong, replete with disorienting use of Scarlett Johansson's seductive whisper in surround sound during Mowgli's crushing encounter with python Kaa. Trust in me: Favreau's film is a majestic walk on the wild side.