Grayson Perry and Yinka Shonibare have designed bags to mark the tenth anniversary of the Foundling Museum

Essex native Grayson Perry has turned his talents to bag design, as part of celebrations to mark the tenth anniversary of the Foundling Museum.

Essex native Grayson Perry has turned his talents to bag design, as part of celebrations to mark the tenth anniversary of the Foundling Museum.

First published in Interviews East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Features Writer

He’s as infamous for his outlandish sense of style as he is incredible art. So perhaps it’s no surprise that Essex native Grayson Perry has turned his talents to bag design, as part of celebrations to mark the tenth anniversary of the Foundling Museum.

He, along with fellow artist Yinka Shonibare, have designed two limited edition tote bags bearing works immediately recognisable as their own.

East London and West Essex Guardian Series:

Perry’s bag design features a mother brandishing a cafetière with the caption: ‘Middle Class and Proud’, whereas Shonibare’s features the silhouette of a man wearing 18th Century costume, holding a rapier and a glass of wine, and entitled ‘Party Boy’.

East London and West Essex Guardian Series:

As part of the festivities, the Bloomsbury-based museum is also hosting an exhibition of existing works by Turner Prize-winning Perry, Shonibare, David Hockney and a new piece by artist Jessie Brennan.

East London and West Essex Guardian Series:

The show, entitled Progress, features works which are interpretations of William Hogarth’s A Rake’s Progress. Hogarth was a governor of the original Foundling Hospital, Britain’s first home for abandoned children in the mid-1700s, and he exhibited his pieces there, encouraging many artists of the period to do the same.

Although the original building was torn down in 2004, the current museum was created to tell the history of the hospital.

Progress will feature Hockney’s A Rake’s Progress (1961-3), Shonibare’s Diary Of A Victorian Dandy (1998), Perry’s The Vanity Of Small Differences (2012) and Brennan’s new work. They will be displayed alongside Hogarth’s original prints from the period, which depict the story of Tom Rakewell, who inherits a fortune before descending into debauchery, debt and madness.

Progress is at the Foundling Museum, Brunswick Square, WC1, until September 7. Details: 020 7841 3600, foundlingmuseum.org.uk

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