At least 2,000 domestic violence cases in Waltham Forest last year

First published in News East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Senior reporter

MORE than 2,000 cases of domestic violence were reported to Victim Support staff in Waltham Forest last year, the council has revealed.

The figures have been released ahead of 'White Ribbon Day' this Sunday (November 25), which is also known as the UN International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

The campaign urges men to wear white ribbons as a pledge not to commit, condone or remain silent about domestic violence.

It estimates one in four women will experience it during some point in their lives.

Cllr Liaquat Ali, cabinet member for community safety, said the council fully backed White Ribbon Day.

He said: “While it’s exceptionally import that we mark White Ribbon Day, domestic violence is, of course, something that we need to constantly bear in mind.

“Domestic violence can take many forms and take place in any kind of relationship or household. I’d urge anyone who has been subjected to domestic violence or who has concerns for a friend or family member to seek the free and confidential help that is on offer locally.”

The council has also said that Leyton-based group Report It managed to obtain nearly 100 court orders, injunctions and non-molestation orders against abusive partners in the region in 2011.

To contact the charity call 020 8558 6228 Monday to Friday between 9.30am and 5pm. Or visit www.reportit.me.uk for more information.

Comments (5)

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5:51pm Fri 23 Nov 12

myopinioncounts says...

A social worker I know told me of a scam involving 'domestic violence'. `A woman reporting such violence demanded to be rehoused. She was told that there were no available homes but she and the children would be put in a refuge that very night. The woman said (through an interpreter) that in that case she would return to her home. This suggests that the extra home was going to be rented out. The recent article about subletting goes supports this.
In genuine cases is it reasonable that the guilty party is allowed to stay in the marital home and another one is provided for the abused?
A social worker I know told me of a scam involving 'domestic violence'. `A woman reporting such violence demanded to be rehoused. She was told that there were no available homes but she and the children would be put in a refuge that very night. The woman said (through an interpreter) that in that case she would return to her home. This suggests that the extra home was going to be rented out. The recent article about subletting goes supports this. In genuine cases is it reasonable that the guilty party is allowed to stay in the marital home and another one is provided for the abused? myopinioncounts
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Fri 23 Nov 12

Brisbane says...

What a deeply sexist organisation the UN is. Men are far more likely to victims of violence than women, yet there is no UN International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Men. Does the UN believe violence against men is somehow perfectly acceptable?

Wouldn't it be nice if we had organisations committed to eliminating violence against all people, irrespective of gender?
What a deeply sexist organisation the UN is. Men are far more likely to victims of violence than women, yet there is no UN International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Men. Does the UN believe violence against men is somehow perfectly acceptable? Wouldn't it be nice if we had organisations committed to eliminating violence against all people, irrespective of gender? Brisbane
  • Score: 0

2:18pm Sat 24 Nov 12

inézc says...

Brisbane-absolutely agree; figures from Mankind suggest 1 in 5 men too are victims, so that is hardly a statistic that can be swept away. The problem that I find, as a solicitor who is committed to eliminating violence against anyone whatever gender, is that men are very reluctant to report it or to seek help. A lot of this is embarrasment, a lot is fear of not being believed (and unfortunately the police in some cases have a long way to go here), and a lot sadly is keeping that upper lip stiff, which in extreme cases can lead to serious injury or even death. I've seen men with knife wounds and scars from being hit with heavy objects by their partners; unfortunately by the time I've got them to admit there was a problem it's too late to get an injunction without notice, and making an application on notice is not tenable by any thinking. We must encourage all victims of DV to seek help. I am grateful to Coronation Street which is running a story about violence against men. Thirty-five years or so ago, women dared not admit to DV because if it happened in the house it was a "domestic" and police wouldn't intervene. Now women are actively encouraged to seek help, and rightly so. I can only hope that something similar will happen with men suffering DV but I pray it won't take another 35 years.
Brisbane-absolutely agree; figures from Mankind suggest 1 in 5 men too are victims, so that is hardly a statistic that can be swept away. The problem that I find, as a solicitor who is committed to eliminating violence against anyone whatever gender, is that men are very reluctant to report it or to seek help. A lot of this is embarrasment, a lot is fear of not being believed (and unfortunately the police in some cases have a long way to go here), and a lot sadly is keeping that upper lip stiff, which in extreme cases can lead to serious injury or even death. I've seen men with knife wounds and scars from being hit with heavy objects by their partners; unfortunately by the time I've got them to admit there was a problem it's too late to get an injunction without notice, and making an application on notice is not tenable by any thinking. We must encourage all victims of DV to seek help. I am grateful to Coronation Street which is running a story about violence against men. Thirty-five years or so ago, women dared not admit to DV because if it happened in the house it was a "domestic" and police wouldn't intervene. Now women are actively encouraged to seek help, and rightly so. I can only hope that something similar will happen with men suffering DV but I pray it won't take another 35 years. inézc
  • Score: 0

6:50pm Sat 24 Nov 12

Cornbeefur says...

As a recipient of a nasty blow from a rolling pin on more than occasion ( from Mrs. Cornbeefur) and having discussed the same topic with friends over a drink with similar experiences, I can confirm that from my own experience and associates, it would, on the face of it, appear that men are as equally likely to suffer such violence in the home.
As a recipient of a nasty blow from a rolling pin on more than occasion ( from Mrs. Cornbeefur) and having discussed the same topic with friends over a drink with similar experiences, I can confirm that from my own experience and associates, it would, on the face of it, appear that men are as equally likely to suffer such violence in the home. Cornbeefur
  • Score: 0

7:54pm Sat 24 Nov 12

inézc says...

They are Cornbeefur; awareness needs to be raised, and men encouraged to come forward. An assault against anyone is unacceptable and we need to do all we can to stop it.
They are Cornbeefur; awareness needs to be raised, and men encouraged to come forward. An assault against anyone is unacceptable and we need to do all we can to stop it. inézc
  • Score: 0

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