Staff at Walthamstow Academy school punish girl for dyeing hair - even though it was done in lesson

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Ms Hughes with her daughter Lucyanne. Ms Hughes with her daughter Lucyanne.

A schoolgirl who had her hair coloured pink as part of a lesson was later excluded from classes for breaking school rules when the dye did not wash out.

Lucyanne Ralph's hair was dyed under the supervision of a teacher during a hair and beauty studies class at Walthamstow Academy in Billet Road just before the Christmas holidays.

But it failed to completely fade and when she returned to classes on Tuesday a teacher sent her to an 'exclusion room' for the entire day as punishment.

The school has banned pupils from attending classes with coloured hair, although it has refused to explain the reason.

The 14-year-old's furious mother, Christine Hughes, said her daughter was kept in a room without any windows with a handful of misbehaving pupils and made to sit in silence for hours.

She said: "It's disgraceful. She tried to explain why her hair was dyed but they wouldn't listen.

"She was taken out of valuable lessons and locked in a small room like a criminal. It's like something out of Victorian times - and she didn't even do anything wrong.

"They wouldn't even let her go outside at break times. Instead of going for a hot lunch in the canteen they brought her a cheese roll.

"She was there until about 2.30pm when I found out and got her out of there."

The school's principal, Emma Skae, said she did not comment on individual pupils and that she hoped to meet with Ms Hughes in an attempt to resolve the matter.

But Ms Hughes said: "The teacher told her she would be in the exclusion room as long as her hair was dyed.

"But she's had enough and isn't even sure if she wants to go back there.

"The dye is supposed to go after a certain number of washes but it hasn't gone yet."

Comments (45)

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9:58pm Tue 8 Jan 13

mdj says...

Just for curiosity, are the teachers suspended if they dye their hair? Does the head stay at home if her roots show? What is the guiding principle here?

My nephew started Leytonstone School some fifteen years ago with a head that looked like a bright orange tennis ball after an unwise experiment. Wisely, nobody said a word.
The pendulum seems to have swung back to when a friend's son started a very self-regarding grammar school a decade earlier, under a general regime that: 'Boys may not have personal idiosyncrasies'!
You can just imagine the fun he had.
Just for curiosity, are the teachers suspended if they dye their hair? Does the head stay at home if her roots show? What is the guiding principle here? My nephew started Leytonstone School some fifteen years ago with a head that looked like a bright orange tennis ball after an unwise experiment. Wisely, nobody said a word. The pendulum seems to have swung back to when a friend's son started a very self-regarding grammar school a decade earlier, under a general regime that: 'Boys may not have personal idiosyncrasies'! You can just imagine the fun he had. mdj

8:02am Wed 9 Jan 13

UKIP-local says...

Of more interest would be to know the name of the school lesson in which hair dying goes on - chemistry?
Of more interest would be to know the name of the school lesson in which hair dying goes on - chemistry? UKIP-local

9:26am Wed 9 Jan 13

Obstinate says...

"hair and beauty studies" according to the article
"hair and beauty studies" according to the article Obstinate

9:31am Wed 9 Jan 13

Tom Thumb says...

Hair and beauty studies?

What a waste of time. Teenagers don't need school to teach them a topic like that.

Whatever happened to "domestic science" (i.e teaching something useful, like how to cook a nutritious meal from cheap and simple ingredients)?
Hair and beauty studies? What a waste of time. Teenagers don't need school to teach them a topic like that. Whatever happened to "domestic science" (i.e teaching something useful, like how to cook a nutritious meal from cheap and simple ingredients)? Tom Thumb

9:42am Wed 9 Jan 13

Cornbeefur says...

Great to hear that these new Academies are getting back to the basics of the three R's

Rinsings, Rollockings and Removals
Great to hear that these new Academies are getting back to the basics of the three R's Rinsings, Rollockings and Removals Cornbeefur

10:10am Wed 9 Jan 13

abbis says...

Nice to know that there are still pupils who have enough hope in the future that they are prepared to start thier training for a career from this age. Good luck to this young lady.
As for the previous comments.... ignore them they can be politicaly cynical about anything.....except mjd who I agree with whole heartedly
The school are in this case were wrong.
Nice to know that there are still pupils who have enough hope in the future that they are prepared to start thier training for a career from this age. Good luck to this young lady. As for the previous comments.... ignore them they can be politicaly cynical about anything.....except mjd who I agree with whole heartedly The school are in this case were wrong. abbis

10:13am Wed 9 Jan 13

abbis says...

By the way I was seriously considering UKIP as my alternative party. Shame, I did not realise that they were quite so small minded!
By the way I was seriously considering UKIP as my alternative party. Shame, I did not realise that they were quite so small minded! abbis

10:33am Wed 9 Jan 13

Techno3 says...

The allegation that the school uses access to food as part of their system of punishment bothers me. Even in prisons, it is considered important that people eat a proper diet.
The allegation that the school uses access to food as part of their system of punishment bothers me. Even in prisons, it is considered important that people eat a proper diet. Techno3

10:35am Wed 9 Jan 13

kitkat510 says...

This is absolutely ridiculous. For a start I don't understand why a school is allowed to have control over hair colour. Even if they do, if this was done under the supervision of a teacher, why did the teacher not step forward immediately as back up to the girls story? (Unless of course she wasn't aware of the exclusion).

I remember the absurd strictness of my school, no "adornments" on shoes. I was sent home with tiny, working buckles on my shoes and told not to return until I had removed them! Which of course meant I had to purchase new shoes. They claimed health and safety. Ridiculous.
This is absolutely ridiculous. For a start I don't understand why a school is allowed to have control over hair colour. Even if they do, if this was done under the supervision of a teacher, why did the teacher not step forward immediately as back up to the girls story? (Unless of course she wasn't aware of the exclusion). I remember the absurd strictness of my school, no "adornments" on shoes. I was sent home with tiny, working buckles on my shoes and told not to return until I had removed them! Which of course meant I had to purchase new shoes. They claimed health and safety. Ridiculous. kitkat510

11:09am Wed 9 Jan 13

Tom Thumb says...

Techno3 wrote:
The allegation that the school uses access to food as part of their system of punishment bothers me. Even in prisons, it is considered important that people eat a proper diet.
One problem with Academies is that they are free to set up any kind of regime they like, free of all local authority control and without any accountability to people who have been elected to office.
The governors have absolute control.
As we know Academies attract sponsorship from religious fundamentalists of all shades, keen to impose their beliefs on young people.
Religions have a strong control freak element, especially where women and their bodies are concerned.
Academies should be shut down and such schools returned to local authority control. It is a sign of how right-wing the Labour Party has become that it is so enthusiastic about these malign institutions,.
[quote][p][bold]Techno3[/bold] wrote: The allegation that the school uses access to food as part of their system of punishment bothers me. Even in prisons, it is considered important that people eat a proper diet.[/p][/quote]One problem with Academies is that they are free to set up any kind of regime they like, free of all local authority control and without any accountability to people who have been elected to office. The governors have absolute control. As we know Academies attract sponsorship from religious fundamentalists of all shades, keen to impose their beliefs on young people. Religions have a strong control freak element, especially where women and their bodies are concerned. Academies should be shut down and such schools returned to local authority control. It is a sign of how right-wing the Labour Party has become that it is so enthusiastic about these malign institutions,. Tom Thumb

12:00pm Wed 9 Jan 13

SXH says...

What has the colour of your hair have to do with your education?.
Firstly if the hair colour was provided by the school then they are liable as they DID NOT use a wash out product, as it did not wash out then proroxide was used, red effect is still hard to cover-up even if dyed to a darker colour, the Teachers need educated on using products they know nothing about.
What has the colour of your hair have to do with your education?. Firstly if the hair colour was provided by the school then they are liable as they DID NOT use a wash out product, as it did not wash out then proroxide was used, red effect is still hard to cover-up even if dyed to a darker colour, the Teachers need educated on using products they know nothing about. SXH

12:22pm Wed 9 Jan 13

E17mum says...

Exactly, SXH, I am really sceptical that a teacher would use peroxide and/or a non-wash out product in a lesson when you are not even allowed to use scissors in hairdressing classes. I suspect there is more to this story.

(though personally don't think it matters if you have pink/red hair in school anyway)
Exactly, SXH, I am really sceptical that a teacher would use peroxide and/or a non-wash out product in a lesson when you are not even allowed to use scissors in hairdressing classes. I suspect there is more to this story. (though personally don't think it matters if you have pink/red hair in school anyway) E17mum

12:33pm Wed 9 Jan 13

Cornbeefur says...

E17mum wrote:
Exactly, SXH, I am really sceptical that a teacher would use peroxide and/or a non-wash out product in a lesson when you are not even allowed to use scissors in hairdressing classes. I suspect there is more to this story.

(though personally don't think it matters if you have pink/red hair in school anyway)
I thought Ginger was out of fashion anyhow?
[quote][p][bold]E17mum[/bold] wrote: Exactly, SXH, I am really sceptical that a teacher would use peroxide and/or a non-wash out product in a lesson when you are not even allowed to use scissors in hairdressing classes. I suspect there is more to this story. (though personally don't think it matters if you have pink/red hair in school anyway)[/p][/quote]I thought Ginger was out of fashion anyhow? Cornbeefur

12:34pm Wed 9 Jan 13

Walthamster says...

Tom Thumb wrote:
Techno3 wrote:
The allegation that the school uses access to food as part of their system of punishment bothers me. Even in prisons, it is considered important that people eat a proper diet.
One problem with Academies is that they are free to set up any kind of regime they like, free of all local authority control and without any accountability to people who have been elected to office.
The governors have absolute control.
As we know Academies attract sponsorship from religious fundamentalists of all shades, keen to impose their beliefs on young people.
Religions have a strong control freak element, especially where women and their bodies are concerned.
Academies should be shut down and such schools returned to local authority control. It is a sign of how right-wing the Labour Party has become that it is so enthusiastic about these malign institutions,.
Yes, this is worrying.
[quote][p][bold]Tom Thumb[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Techno3[/bold] wrote: The allegation that the school uses access to food as part of their system of punishment bothers me. Even in prisons, it is considered important that people eat a proper diet.[/p][/quote]One problem with Academies is that they are free to set up any kind of regime they like, free of all local authority control and without any accountability to people who have been elected to office. The governors have absolute control. As we know Academies attract sponsorship from religious fundamentalists of all shades, keen to impose their beliefs on young people. Religions have a strong control freak element, especially where women and their bodies are concerned. Academies should be shut down and such schools returned to local authority control. It is a sign of how right-wing the Labour Party has become that it is so enthusiastic about these malign institutions,.[/p][/quote]Yes, this is worrying. Walthamster

12:38pm Wed 9 Jan 13

E17mum says...

...if true.
...if true. E17mum

1:18pm Wed 9 Jan 13

SXH says...

Peroxide and not proroxide (my error)

Tom Thumb says: Religions have a strong control freak element, especially where women and their bodies are concerned.

You have a point here, which needs looking in to.

The girl is 14 years old? i know many girls at that age and younger who have dyed hair, are they punished also? if there anything in the schools rules on hair colour? many schools concerns are on uniforms.
Peroxide and not proroxide (my error) Tom Thumb says: Religions have a strong control freak element, especially where women and their bodies are concerned. You have a point here, which needs looking in to. The girl is 14 years old? i know many girls at that age and younger who have dyed hair, are they punished also? if there anything in the schools rules on hair colour? many schools concerns are on uniforms. SXH

1:27pm Wed 9 Jan 13

mdj says...

PS: 'The school's principal, Emma Skae, said she did not comment on individual pupils and that she hoped to meet with Ms Hughes in an attempt to resolve the matter.'
Not exactly a robust defence! Have pupils noticed any variation in her or her staff's hair colouring from time to time, one wonders?

Were it not for the singling-out in this case, it's possible to defend petty regulations in schools, because there's nothing that stimulates a sense of justice more than being on the wrong end of injustice. Against this, however, is the Convent Girl Syndrome...
PS: 'The school's principal, Emma Skae, said she did not comment on individual pupils and that she hoped to meet with Ms Hughes in an attempt to resolve the matter.' Not exactly a robust defence! Have pupils noticed any variation in her or her staff's hair colouring from time to time, one wonders? Were it not for the singling-out in this case, it's possible to defend petty regulations in schools, because there's nothing that stimulates a sense of justice more than being on the wrong end of injustice. Against this, however, is the Convent Girl Syndrome... mdj

1:33pm Wed 9 Jan 13

SXH says...

mdj wrote:
PS: 'The school's principal, Emma Skae, said she did not comment on individual pupils and that she hoped to meet with Ms Hughes in an attempt to resolve the matter.' Not exactly a robust defence! Have pupils noticed any variation in her or her staff's hair colouring from time to time, one wonders? Were it not for the singling-out in this case, it's possible to defend petty regulations in schools, because there's nothing that stimulates a sense of justice more than being on the wrong end of injustice. Against this, however, is the Convent Girl Syndrome...
so true mdj
[quote][p][bold]mdj[/bold] wrote: PS: 'The school's principal, Emma Skae, said she did not comment on individual pupils and that she hoped to meet with Ms Hughes in an attempt to resolve the matter.' Not exactly a robust defence! Have pupils noticed any variation in her or her staff's hair colouring from time to time, one wonders? Were it not for the singling-out in this case, it's possible to defend petty regulations in schools, because there's nothing that stimulates a sense of justice more than being on the wrong end of injustice. Against this, however, is the Convent Girl Syndrome...[/p][/quote]so true mdj SXH

2:49pm Wed 9 Jan 13

ivcurak says...

If we are being honest and bring a story to the paper, let's give them the truth. Here is what actually happened. Lucyanne did dye the lower portion of her hair in her lesson using wash out dye. But then why is her hair fully dyed now? Well, that's because she took it upon herself to color the rest in her own time, knowing full well what the consequences were going to be - and here we are. Furethermore, her friend who did the same has accepted that she was wrong and is going to have her hair dyed back to her natural color today - common sense goes a long way, and so does owning up to the real truth.
If we are being honest and bring a story to the paper, let's give them the truth. Here is what actually happened. Lucyanne did dye the lower portion of her hair in her lesson using wash out dye. But then why is her hair fully dyed now? Well, that's because she took it upon herself to color the rest in her own time, knowing full well what the consequences were going to be - and here we are. Furethermore, her friend who did the same has accepted that she was wrong and is going to have her hair dyed back to her natural color today - common sense goes a long way, and so does owning up to the real truth. ivcurak

2:52pm Wed 9 Jan 13

Alan_1976 says...

ivcurak wrote:
If we are being honest and bring a story to the paper, let's give them the truth. Here is what actually happened. Lucyanne did dye the lower portion of her hair in her lesson using wash out dye. But then why is her hair fully dyed now? Well, that's because she took it upon herself to color the rest in her own time, knowing full well what the consequences were going to be - and here we are. Furethermore, her friend who did the same has accepted that she was wrong and is going to have her hair dyed back to her natural color today - common sense goes a long way, and so does owning up to the real truth.
When you say "Common Sense" perhaps you might like to explain what business it is of the school's what colour her hair is?
[quote][p][bold]ivcurak[/bold] wrote: If we are being honest and bring a story to the paper, let's give them the truth. Here is what actually happened. Lucyanne did dye the lower portion of her hair in her lesson using wash out dye. But then why is her hair fully dyed now? Well, that's because she took it upon herself to color the rest in her own time, knowing full well what the consequences were going to be - and here we are. Furethermore, her friend who did the same has accepted that she was wrong and is going to have her hair dyed back to her natural color today - common sense goes a long way, and so does owning up to the real truth.[/p][/quote]When you say "Common Sense" perhaps you might like to explain what business it is of the school's what colour her hair is? Alan_1976

3:01pm Wed 9 Jan 13

ivcurak says...

The school has policies, and they are not there to just tick a box.
The school has policies, and they are not there to just tick a box. ivcurak

3:16pm Wed 9 Jan 13

Alan_1976 says...

ivcurak wrote:
The school has policies, and they are not there to just tick a box.
That is not even an answer
[quote][p][bold]ivcurak[/bold] wrote: The school has policies, and they are not there to just tick a box.[/p][/quote]That is not even an answer Alan_1976

5:36pm Wed 9 Jan 13

jennaSmith says...

Sounds to me that this child is used to getting her own way maybe the mum should've done more about her daughter disobeying the school rules the school and the teachers especially the hair & beauty teacher do an excellent job and are fair with those who obey the rules. My friends daughter attended this school and has done hair and beauty in the past all hair dye that was done in class does indeed wash out, if it doesnt it's your responsibility not the schools.this is an unfair on a brilliant school.
Sounds to me that this child is used to getting her own way maybe the mum should've done more about her daughter disobeying the school rules the school and the teachers especially the hair & beauty teacher do an excellent job and are fair with those who obey the rules. My friends daughter attended this school and has done hair and beauty in the past all hair dye that was done in class does indeed wash out, if it doesnt it's your responsibility not the schools.this is an unfair on a brilliant school. jennaSmith

7:16pm Wed 9 Jan 13

Tom Thumb says...

jennaSmith wrote:
Sounds to me that this child is used to getting her own way maybe the mum should've done more about her daughter disobeying the school rules the school and the teachers especially the hair & beauty teacher do an excellent job and are fair with those who obey the rules. My friends daughter attended this school and has done hair and beauty in the past all hair dye that was done in class does indeed wash out, if it doesnt it's your responsibility not the schools.this is an unfair on a brilliant school.
A brilliant school would not punish a child in this way.
A brilliant school would not refuse to enter into a dialogue with the child.
A brilliant school would not seek to control the hair colour of teenagers.
What happens to a blonde teenager who joins this school? Do they have to prove to the head they are naturally blonde?
There is nothing remotely outrageous about the appearance of this girl, and it reveals a lot that some people want to control how a girl looks.
Teacher, leave those kids alone!
[quote][p][bold]jennaSmith[/bold] wrote: Sounds to me that this child is used to getting her own way maybe the mum should've done more about her daughter disobeying the school rules the school and the teachers especially the hair & beauty teacher do an excellent job and are fair with those who obey the rules. My friends daughter attended this school and has done hair and beauty in the past all hair dye that was done in class does indeed wash out, if it doesnt it's your responsibility not the schools.this is an unfair on a brilliant school.[/p][/quote]A brilliant school would not punish a child in this way. A brilliant school would not refuse to enter into a dialogue with the child. A brilliant school would not seek to control the hair colour of teenagers. What happens to a blonde teenager who joins this school? Do they have to prove to the head they are naturally blonde? There is nothing remotely outrageous about the appearance of this girl, and it reveals a lot that some people want to control how a girl looks. Teacher, leave those kids alone! Tom Thumb

7:36pm Wed 9 Jan 13

Tom Thumb says...

kitkat510 wrote:
This is absolutely ridiculous. For a start I don't understand why a school is allowed to have control over hair colour. Even if they do, if this was done under the supervision of a teacher, why did the teacher not step forward immediately as back up to the girls story? (Unless of course she wasn't aware of the exclusion).

I remember the absurd strictness of my school, no "adornments" on shoes. I was sent home with tiny, working buckles on my shoes and told not to return until I had removed them! Which of course meant I had to purchase new shoes. They claimed health and safety. Ridiculous.
At my school the rule was black shoes. One day I turned up wearing brown shoes and the head teacher went ballistic.
But so far there is no scientific evidence that academic achievement is related to either the colour of your hair or of your shoes.
People who have a rage for order or who seek to dictate how other people should dress often seem to have ISSUES.
[quote][p][bold]kitkat510[/bold] wrote: This is absolutely ridiculous. For a start I don't understand why a school is allowed to have control over hair colour. Even if they do, if this was done under the supervision of a teacher, why did the teacher not step forward immediately as back up to the girls story? (Unless of course she wasn't aware of the exclusion). I remember the absurd strictness of my school, no "adornments" on shoes. I was sent home with tiny, working buckles on my shoes and told not to return until I had removed them! Which of course meant I had to purchase new shoes. They claimed health and safety. Ridiculous.[/p][/quote]At my school the rule was black shoes. One day I turned up wearing brown shoes and the head teacher went ballistic. But so far there is no scientific evidence that academic achievement is related to either the colour of your hair or of your shoes. People who have a rage for order or who seek to dictate how other people should dress often seem to have ISSUES. Tom Thumb

7:42pm Wed 9 Jan 13

SXH says...

I tend to agree with Tom Thumb, many girls that age dye their hair, and many have high-lights, if it was dyed a darker colour would the school approve?
I tend to agree with Tom Thumb, many girls that age dye their hair, and many have high-lights, if it was dyed a darker colour would the school approve? SXH

7:45pm Wed 9 Jan 13

jennaSmith says...

The rules of the school are that you are not allowed to dye your hair outrageous colours like pink or blue , not that u are not allowed to dye your hair at all.
The rules of the school are that you are not allowed to dye your hair outrageous colours like pink or blue , not that u are not allowed to dye your hair at all. jennaSmith

7:57pm Wed 9 Jan 13

Alan_1976 says...

jennaSmith wrote:
The rules of the school are that you are not allowed to dye your hair outrageous colours like pink or blue , not that u are not allowed to dye your hair at all.
A brilliant school might notice that the girls hair is neither pink nor blue...

Though even if the hair were either of those colours who exactly would be "outraged"?

Next thing you know these kids will be listening to popular beat combos and dancing...
[quote][p][bold]jennaSmith[/bold] wrote: The rules of the school are that you are not allowed to dye your hair outrageous colours like pink or blue , not that u are not allowed to dye your hair at all.[/p][/quote]A brilliant school might notice that the girls hair is neither pink nor blue... Though even if the hair were either of those colours who exactly would be "outraged"? Next thing you know these kids will be listening to popular beat combos and dancing... Alan_1976

8:58pm Wed 9 Jan 13

christine hughes says...

I AM LUCYANNES MOTHER, And for your information we have a photo of lucyanne in the school salon with a full head of red hair DONE IN A LESSON, this is NOT the issue or a problem to any of us...The problem is her being bunished for it not completly gone or her hair being to outragous.. She as far as she is concerned has done nothing wrong and I agree with her, and I would like add, that it was NOT JUST THE LOWER PORTION OF HER HAIR. And also she values her hair-dressing lesson and the hair-dressing Teacher... She is a very good Teacher and liked very much and Lucyanne os doing very well in this class.
I AM LUCYANNES MOTHER, And for your information we have a photo of lucyanne in the school salon with a full head of red hair DONE IN A LESSON, this is NOT the issue or a problem to any of us...The problem is her being bunished for it not completly gone or her hair being to outragous.. She as far as she is concerned has done nothing wrong and I agree with her, and I would like add, that it was NOT JUST THE LOWER PORTION OF HER HAIR. And also she values her hair-dressing lesson and the hair-dressing Teacher... She is a very good Teacher and liked very much and Lucyanne os doing very well in this class. christine hughes

9:29am Thu 10 Jan 13

ivcurak says...

I do not believe that the issue is the color of shoes or hair, but rules.

I think the school is trying to teach students that there exist rules that need to be followed, in order to become mature and responsible young adults.

I believe in free choice, but I think at the end of the day, if you sign up to the rules, and choose not to follow them then you need to understand that there are consequences for your actions.

In this case the student knew the consequences ahead of time and made a choice. It really is that simple.
I do not believe that the issue is the color of shoes or hair, but rules. I think the school is trying to teach students that there exist rules that need to be followed, in order to become mature and responsible young adults. I believe in free choice, but I think at the end of the day, if you sign up to the rules, and choose not to follow them then you need to understand that there are consequences for your actions. In this case the student knew the consequences ahead of time and made a choice. It really is that simple. ivcurak

9:56am Thu 10 Jan 13

Alan_1976 says...

ivcurak wrote:
I do not believe that the issue is the color of shoes or hair, but rules.

I think the school is trying to teach students that there exist rules that need to be followed, in order to become mature and responsible young adults.

I believe in free choice, but I think at the end of the day, if you sign up to the rules, and choose not to follow them then you need to understand that there are consequences for your actions.

In this case the student knew the consequences ahead of time and made a choice. It really is that simple.
Seems more than a little odd that it was the school who helped her get her hair this colour in the first place...

Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them
[quote][p][bold]ivcurak[/bold] wrote: I do not believe that the issue is the color of shoes or hair, but rules. I think the school is trying to teach students that there exist rules that need to be followed, in order to become mature and responsible young adults. I believe in free choice, but I think at the end of the day, if you sign up to the rules, and choose not to follow them then you need to understand that there are consequences for your actions. In this case the student knew the consequences ahead of time and made a choice. It really is that simple.[/p][/quote]Seems more than a little odd that it was the school who helped her get her hair this colour in the first place... Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them Alan_1976

10:29am Thu 10 Jan 13

ivcurak says...

Alan_1976 wrote:
ivcurak wrote:
I do not believe that the issue is the color of shoes or hair, but rules.

I think the school is trying to teach students that there exist rules that need to be followed, in order to become mature and responsible young adults.

I believe in free choice, but I think at the end of the day, if you sign up to the rules, and choose not to follow them then you need to understand that there are consequences for your actions.

In this case the student knew the consequences ahead of time and made a choice. It really is that simple.
Seems more than a little odd that it was the school who helped her get her hair this colour in the first place...

Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them
please read the first msg I wrote.
[quote][p][bold]Alan_1976[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ivcurak[/bold] wrote: I do not believe that the issue is the color of shoes or hair, but rules. I think the school is trying to teach students that there exist rules that need to be followed, in order to become mature and responsible young adults. I believe in free choice, but I think at the end of the day, if you sign up to the rules, and choose not to follow them then you need to understand that there are consequences for your actions. In this case the student knew the consequences ahead of time and made a choice. It really is that simple.[/p][/quote]Seems more than a little odd that it was the school who helped her get her hair this colour in the first place... Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them[/p][/quote]please read the first msg I wrote. ivcurak

10:31am Thu 10 Jan 13

mdj says...

'Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them'?
Bravo!
If the school is teaching that arbitrary power must be obeyed, and that what you were told to do one day is an offence the next, that is of course educational in itself!
Could ivcurak explain what part of Mrs Hughes' statement above is false, what rule was broken, and how the young lady could have known that it existed,since her hair was dyed in class?
Again, could someone tell us whether teachers are banned from dying their hair? An art teacher I see locally has the wackiest hair colourings, and I'm sure it raises morale all round!
'Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them'? Bravo! If the school is teaching that arbitrary power must be obeyed, and that what you were told to do one day is an offence the next, that is of course educational in itself! Could ivcurak explain what part of Mrs Hughes' statement above is false, what rule was broken, and how the young lady could have known that it existed,since her hair was dyed in class? Again, could someone tell us whether teachers are banned from dying their hair? An art teacher I see locally has the wackiest hair colourings, and I'm sure it raises morale all round! mdj

11:22am Thu 10 Jan 13

SXH says...

mdj wrote:
'Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them'? Bravo! If the school is teaching that arbitrary power must be obeyed, and that what you were told to do one day is an offence the next, that is of course educational in itself! Could ivcurak explain what part of Mrs Hughes' statement above is false, what rule was broken, and how the young lady could have known that it existed,since her hair was dyed in class? Again, could someone tell us whether teachers are banned from dying their hair? An art teacher I see locally has the wackiest hair colourings, and I'm sure it raises morale all round!
I second this.
[quote][p][bold]mdj[/bold] wrote: 'Or was this part of the school's effort to show that authority figures are more than happy to ignore rules when it suits them'? Bravo! If the school is teaching that arbitrary power must be obeyed, and that what you were told to do one day is an offence the next, that is of course educational in itself! Could ivcurak explain what part of Mrs Hughes' statement above is false, what rule was broken, and how the young lady could have known that it existed,since her hair was dyed in class? Again, could someone tell us whether teachers are banned from dying their hair? An art teacher I see locally has the wackiest hair colourings, and I'm sure it raises morale all round![/p][/quote]I second this. SXH

3:03pm Thu 10 Jan 13

sujitha says...

Lucyanne has been in this school long enough to know what the rules are and know what the concequences are when they're broken. She can easily re-dye her hair back to her natural colour and save everyone the trouble. i find it immature that her mum is taking this to press it shows how irresponsible she is about her daughters education.if they want to do what they wish to do then walthamstow Academy is not the place for them there is plenty other schools and we will like to see how well she gets on their with that attitude.
Lucyanne has been in this school long enough to know what the rules are and know what the concequences are when they're broken. She can easily re-dye her hair back to her natural colour and save everyone the trouble. i find it immature that her mum is taking this to press it shows how irresponsible she is about her daughters education.if they want to do what they wish to do then walthamstow Academy is not the place for them there is plenty other schools and we will like to see how well she gets on their with that attitude. sujitha

4:11pm Thu 10 Jan 13

Alan_1976 says...

sujitha wrote:
Lucyanne has been in this school long enough to know what the rules are and know what the concequences are when they're broken. She can easily re-dye her hair back to her natural colour and save everyone the trouble. i find it immature that her mum is taking this to press it shows how irresponsible she is about her daughters education.if they want to do what they wish to do then walthamstow Academy is not the place for them there is plenty other schools and we will like to see how well she gets on their with that attitude.
Again ignoring the fact that the school died the hair that colour.

Sounds to me like the school is being fairly irresponsible about the daughter's education by denying her access to it.
[quote][p][bold]sujitha[/bold] wrote: Lucyanne has been in this school long enough to know what the rules are and know what the concequences are when they're broken. She can easily re-dye her hair back to her natural colour and save everyone the trouble. i find it immature that her mum is taking this to press it shows how irresponsible she is about her daughters education.if they want to do what they wish to do then walthamstow Academy is not the place for them there is plenty other schools and we will like to see how well she gets on their with that attitude.[/p][/quote]Again ignoring the fact that the school died the hair that colour. Sounds to me like the school is being fairly irresponsible about the daughter's education by denying her access to it. Alan_1976

10:49am Fri 11 Jan 13

SXH says...

sujitha wrote:
Lucyanne has been in this school long enough to know what the rules are and know what the concequences are when they're broken. She can easily re-dye her hair back to her natural colour and save everyone the trouble. i find it immature that her mum is taking this to press it shows how irresponsible she is about her daughters education.if they want to do what they wish to do then walthamstow Academy is not the place for them there is plenty other schools and we will like to see how well she gets on their with that attitude.
ouch bad comments here are you a member of staff or the Head?
[quote][p][bold]sujitha[/bold] wrote: Lucyanne has been in this school long enough to know what the rules are and know what the concequences are when they're broken. She can easily re-dye her hair back to her natural colour and save everyone the trouble. i find it immature that her mum is taking this to press it shows how irresponsible she is about her daughters education.if they want to do what they wish to do then walthamstow Academy is not the place for them there is plenty other schools and we will like to see how well she gets on their with that attitude.[/p][/quote]ouch bad comments here are you a member of staff or the Head? SXH

12:47pm Fri 11 Jan 13

abbis says...

Probably a teacher....note the spelling mistakes and use of small I
Probably a teacher....note the spelling mistakes and use of small I abbis

2:26pm Fri 11 Jan 13

SXH says...

I feel some of these comments are coming from students from the school, I reallly hope no one starts to bully the girl over the colour of her hair.

So if a teacher applied for a job at the school with that colour hair, no matter how experianraced she is, she will not get the job?
I feel some of these comments are coming from students from the school, I reallly hope no one starts to bully the girl over the colour of her hair. So if a teacher applied for a job at the school with that colour hair, no matter how experianraced she is, she will not get the job? SXH

4:08pm Fri 11 Jan 13

Paul Skinner says...

Stupid rule plus stupid bureaucrats equals stupid decisions.

School should apologise and change the rule and everyone should move on.
Stupid rule plus stupid bureaucrats equals stupid decisions. School should apologise and change the rule and everyone should move on. Paul Skinner

11:32pm Fri 11 Jan 13

HELLoPanda says...

I've been doing hairdressing in that school for two years , and I am sure that none of the teachers are allowed to give the children permanent hair dye ...And I also know the teacher Mrs S. which would never give them permanent hair dye .... As I said I done hairdressing before and as everyone is complaining about the school letting them dye their hair , it's not as bad as you ALL make it look...This is actually part of the course , you have to practice on other people's hair so you can actually get use to work on natural hair , also they don't do it if you are not agree with it...So get over it and grow up , stop getting involved if you don't actually know anything about Walthamstow Academy , I go there and I am tired of seeing all this in here , which is probably half of the actual story anyway.
I've been doing hairdressing in that school for two years , and I am sure that none of the teachers are allowed to give the children permanent hair dye ...And I also know the teacher Mrs S. which would never give them permanent hair dye .... As I said I done hairdressing before and as everyone is complaining about the school letting them dye their hair , it's not as bad as you ALL make it look...This is actually part of the course , you have to practice on other people's hair so you can actually get use to work on natural hair , also they don't do it if you are not agree with it...So get over it and grow up , stop getting involved if you don't actually know anything about Walthamstow Academy , I go there and I am tired of seeing all this in here , which is probably half of the actual story anyway. HELLoPanda

12:55am Sat 12 Jan 13

SXH says...

These stories are for anyone to comment, i see nothing in the story saying only comments from the school ?.
and we are making comments on what we read

The Guardian report stories for anyone to voice there opinion
These stories are for anyone to comment, i see nothing in the story saying only comments from the school ?. and we are making comments on what we read The Guardian report stories for anyone to voice there opinion SXH

10:39am Sat 26 Jan 13

Furor Teutonicus says...

Take the teacher that administered this dye to court.

"Administering a noxious substance", "Assault", "Bodily harm".... I am sure there is something there that could bring a solicitor a good breakfast.
Take the teacher that administered this dye to court. "Administering a noxious substance", "Assault", "Bodily harm".... I am sure there is something there that could bring a solicitor a good breakfast. Furor Teutonicus

10:39am Sat 26 Jan 13

Furor Teutonicus says...

Take the teacher that administered this dye to court.

"Administering a noxious substance", "Assault", "Bodily harm".... I am sure there is something there that could bring a solicitor a good breakfast.
Take the teacher that administered this dye to court. "Administering a noxious substance", "Assault", "Bodily harm".... I am sure there is something there that could bring a solicitor a good breakfast. Furor Teutonicus

11:36am Sat 26 Jan 13

christine hughes says...

Thanks for your input ♡:) but the colouring of her hair was part of her hairdressing class and was not the problem for us.The problem was that my daughter was punished for this.
Lack of comuncation of staff.

CHEERS.
Thanks for your input ♡:) but the colouring of her hair was part of her hairdressing class and was not the problem for us.The problem was that my daughter was punished for this. Lack of comuncation of staff. CHEERS. christine hughes

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