Flats plan in Walthamstow recommended for approval

Plans for a five-storey building with 43 flats at the site of an empty warehouse in Walthamstow have been recommended for approval.

Applicant Adam Preece wants to build the development at the site of a former industrial estate complex in Sutherland Road, near Blackhorse Lane.

Council officers said in a report that the development was in line with the authority's housing policy and strategy for the Blackhorse area of Walthamstow.

The proposed development includes 21 three-bedroom properties, four four-bed flats, 14 two-bed apartments and four one-bed homes.

The plans also include 20 parking spaces.

A total of 13 of the flats will be "affordable" but there is no provision for social housing.

A council report states that 283 nearby properties were consulted. The authority received two objections, highlighting concerns about the impact on parking and anti-social behaviour in the area.

The report adds that the development will result in the loss of "significant" trees in the area, but suggests the developers pay £24,495 in section 106 grant money to the council to pay for replacements.

A further £1,200 per flat and £5,000 towards air quality monitoring is also recommended as part of the section 106 agreement.

Councillors on the planning committee are due to vote on the plans on Tuesday March 5.

Comments (15)

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11:46am Sat 23 Feb 13

Cornbeefur says...

It would appear that the S106 Money is a drop in the ocean.

The strain on the infrustrucure will be immense.

How do they calculate what is affordable?

I note they are not including 'social housing' implying that they are trying to gentrify this run down area.
It would appear that the S106 Money is a drop in the ocean. The strain on the infrustrucure will be immense. How do they calculate what is affordable? I note they are not including 'social housing' implying that they are trying to gentrify this run down area. Cornbeefur

12:06pm Sat 23 Feb 13

Techno3 says...

Why is the warehouse empty? I would venture that high taxes and over-regulation imposed on businesses would have a fair bit to do with that.
Why is the warehouse empty? I would venture that high taxes and over-regulation imposed on businesses would have a fair bit to do with that. Techno3

3:02pm Sat 23 Feb 13

mdj says...

'Council officers said in a report that the development was in line with the authority's housing policy and strategy for the Blackhorse area of Walthamstow...'

...of importing jobseekers while exporting jobs, presumably.
'Council officers said in a report that the development was in line with the authority's housing policy and strategy for the Blackhorse area of Walthamstow...' ...of importing jobseekers while exporting jobs, presumably. mdj

3:47pm Sat 23 Feb 13

HappyDucks says...

So, 43 flats and only 20 car parking spaces ? With the strong possibility of some residents (i.e. couples and / or families with adult children) having more than one car this is another parking disaster waiting to happen.
So, 43 flats and only 20 car parking spaces ? With the strong possibility of some residents (i.e. couples and / or families with adult children) having more than one car this is another parking disaster waiting to happen. HappyDucks

3:55pm Sat 23 Feb 13

myopinioncounts says...

43 homes with only 20 parking spaces! 5 storeys - I hope there will not be any social housing in the development because high rise living is never successful when they put families from the social housing sector into them. Remember how families fought to get out of tower blocks by using the 'medical' route?
43 homes with only 20 parking spaces! 5 storeys - I hope there will not be any social housing in the development because high rise living is never successful when they put families from the social housing sector into them. Remember how families fought to get out of tower blocks by using the 'medical' route? myopinioncounts

8:20am Sun 24 Feb 13

LakeBreeze says...

While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen.

Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking.

So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.
While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen. Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking. So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece. LakeBreeze

10:37am Sun 24 Feb 13

skealey says...

LakeBreeze wrote:
While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen.

Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking.

So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.
Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%.

So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average.

The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling.
[quote][p][bold]LakeBreeze[/bold] wrote: While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen. Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking. So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.[/p][/quote]Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%. So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average. The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling. skealey

10:57am Sun 24 Feb 13

LakeBreeze says...

skealey wrote:
LakeBreeze wrote:
While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen.

Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking.

So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.
Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%.

So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average.

The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling.
I appreciate the sense in those figures, but these things are fluid, and while temporary downturns in numbers may occur, the general trend points to future figures rising over-all, even with smaller rise-and-fall fluctuations due to the economic forces -- which themselves change.

So while the parking planned fits statistics "right here and now" so to speak, it's arguably not going to accomodate well going forward, if these homes are lived in for at least the next fifty years.
[quote][p][bold]skealey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LakeBreeze[/bold] wrote: While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen. Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking. So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.[/p][/quote]Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%. So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average. The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling.[/p][/quote]I appreciate the sense in those figures, but these things are fluid, and while temporary downturns in numbers may occur, the general trend points to future figures rising over-all, even with smaller rise-and-fall fluctuations due to the economic forces -- which themselves change. So while the parking planned fits statistics "right here and now" so to speak, it's arguably not going to accomodate well going forward, if these homes are lived in for at least the next fifty years. LakeBreeze

11:46am Sun 24 Feb 13

stickmanny says...

LakeBreeze wrote:
skealey wrote:
LakeBreeze wrote:
While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen.

Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking.

So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.
Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%.

So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average.

The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling.
I appreciate the sense in those figures, but these things are fluid, and while temporary downturns in numbers may occur, the general trend points to future figures rising over-all, even with smaller rise-and-fall fluctuations due to the economic forces -- which themselves change.

So while the parking planned fits statistics "right here and now" so to speak, it's arguably not going to accomodate well going forward, if these homes are lived in for at least the next fifty years.
If you appreciate the sense in the figures then you must accept that a ten year downward trend, plus many years of low growth ahead means there is no issue here.

It's time to stop pandering to car owners.
[quote][p][bold]LakeBreeze[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skealey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LakeBreeze[/bold] wrote: While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen. Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking. So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.[/p][/quote]Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%. So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average. The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling.[/p][/quote]I appreciate the sense in those figures, but these things are fluid, and while temporary downturns in numbers may occur, the general trend points to future figures rising over-all, even with smaller rise-and-fall fluctuations due to the economic forces -- which themselves change. So while the parking planned fits statistics "right here and now" so to speak, it's arguably not going to accomodate well going forward, if these homes are lived in for at least the next fifty years.[/p][/quote]If you appreciate the sense in the figures then you must accept that a ten year downward trend, plus many years of low growth ahead means there is no issue here. It's time to stop pandering to car owners. stickmanny

12:27pm Sun 24 Feb 13

Tom Thumb says...

skealey wrote:
LakeBreeze wrote:
While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen.

Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking.

So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.
Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%.

So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average.

The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling.
Could you give the figures for households with two vehicles and three vehicles?
I think you'll find they have gone up.
This is why 20 spaces for 43 homes is totally unrealistic.
It would be much better to create no parking spaces at all, and deny the householders the right to a CPZ permit, as happens with some developments. This one is within walking distance of an underground/overgrou
nd station and is well served by buses.
[quote][p][bold]skealey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LakeBreeze[/bold] wrote: While at least an empty warehouse is getting its footprint space put to good use -- rather than a greenspace falling victim to development -- I agree that the poor decision on parking spaces is going to be a real nightmare waiting to happen. Like it or not, more people are owning a car these days, and not unreasonably desiring to be able to park by their home rather than two blocks away. Existing housing, be it flats or just streets of family houses, is already experiencing crises over parking. So they "build new" with a fresh opportunity to plan something better -- with ALSO inadequate parking? Nice planning for future realities, Mr. Preece.[/p][/quote]Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%. So actually, 43 homes with 20 parking spaces fits almost perfectly into this average. The census data shows the majority (only just) of people don't own a car, and car ownership is actually falling.[/p][/quote]Could you give the figures for households with two vehicles and three vehicles? I think you'll find they have gone up. This is why 20 spaces for 43 homes is totally unrealistic. It would be much better to create no parking spaces at all, and deny the householders the right to a CPZ permit, as happens with some developments. This one is within walking distance of an underground/overgrou nd station and is well served by buses. Tom Thumb

1:33pm Sun 24 Feb 13

skealey says...

For LakeBreeze and Tom Thumb and anyone else who can't accept the statistic that proves a large downward trend in car ownership, here is the full 2011 census data (2001 in brackets) for Waltham Forest:

No cars or vans in household (%) (45.9) 50.8

1 car or van in household (%) (44.8) 40.2

2 cars or vans in household (%) (8.4) 7.2

3 cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 1.3

4 or more cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 0.4

Clearly a downward trend in car ownership (this follows the same pattern seen all over London).

One can clutch at straws by finding a tiny increase in the number of people with three cars...a ridiculous number of vehicles to own in a city.

In short, 20 spaces for 43 homes is demonstrably not unrealistic.
For LakeBreeze and Tom Thumb and anyone else who can't accept the statistic that proves a large downward trend in car ownership, here is the full 2011 census data (2001 in brackets) for Waltham Forest: No cars or vans in household (%) (45.9) 50.8 1 car or van in household (%) (44.8) 40.2 2 cars or vans in household (%) (8.4) 7.2 3 cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 1.3 4 or more cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 0.4 Clearly a downward trend in car ownership (this follows the same pattern seen all over London). One can clutch at straws by finding a tiny increase in the number of people with three cars...a ridiculous number of vehicles to own in a city. In short, 20 spaces for 43 homes is demonstrably not unrealistic. skealey

7:42pm Sun 24 Feb 13

Tom Thumb says...

skealey wrote:
For LakeBreeze and Tom Thumb and anyone else who can't accept the statistic that proves a large downward trend in car ownership, here is the full 2011 census data (2001 in brackets) for Waltham Forest:

No cars or vans in household (%) (45.9) 50.8

1 car or van in household (%) (44.8) 40.2

2 cars or vans in household (%) (8.4) 7.2

3 cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 1.3

4 or more cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 0.4

Clearly a downward trend in car ownership (this follows the same pattern seen all over London).

One can clutch at straws by finding a tiny increase in the number of people with three cars...a ridiculous number of vehicles to own in a city.

In short, 20 spaces for 43 homes is demonstrably not unrealistic.
An almost 300 per cent increase in households owning three vehicles is not "a tiny increase".
The problem with your "realism" is that local residential streets are not half empty of cars, reflecting the census figures, but on the contrary bursting at the seams.
I've noticed that my local streets contain both vehicles which are parked by outsiders (using blue badges, almost certainly fraudulent) and by local businesses. These kinds of parker don't show up in the census.

The figures are very interesting but they don't reflect demand for parking.
Bear in mind that the residents of this development will have visitors turning up by car, as well as service vehicles delivering groceries, doing maintenance etc.
The 20 spaces will all be full and the overflow parking will go to local streets.
By the way I am not saying that this is a good thing. This council has very bad transport policies which put the car ahead of the pedestrian and the cyclist. The rise in households without a car is not reflected by a shift to cycling, which remains almost non-existent locally because of the terrible infrastructure. But then Councillor Loakes recently said that he wanted to make it as easy as possible for local people to use a car to go and buy a loaf of bread or a carton of milk. With someone like him in charge of transport it is not surprising that the local streets are crammed with cars and overweight people driving ridiculously short distances.
[quote][p][bold]skealey[/bold] wrote: For LakeBreeze and Tom Thumb and anyone else who can't accept the statistic that proves a large downward trend in car ownership, here is the full 2011 census data (2001 in brackets) for Waltham Forest: No cars or vans in household (%) (45.9) 50.8 1 car or van in household (%) (44.8) 40.2 2 cars or vans in household (%) (8.4) 7.2 3 cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 1.3 4 or more cars or vans in household (%) (0.5) 0.4 Clearly a downward trend in car ownership (this follows the same pattern seen all over London). One can clutch at straws by finding a tiny increase in the number of people with three cars...a ridiculous number of vehicles to own in a city. In short, 20 spaces for 43 homes is demonstrably not unrealistic.[/p][/quote]An almost 300 per cent increase in households owning three vehicles is not "a tiny increase". The problem with your "realism" is that local residential streets are not half empty of cars, reflecting the census figures, but on the contrary bursting at the seams. I've noticed that my local streets contain both vehicles which are parked by outsiders (using blue badges, almost certainly fraudulent) and by local businesses. These kinds of parker don't show up in the census. The figures are very interesting but they don't reflect demand for parking. Bear in mind that the residents of this development will have visitors turning up by car, as well as service vehicles delivering groceries, doing maintenance etc. The 20 spaces will all be full and the overflow parking will go to local streets. By the way I am not saying that this is a good thing. This council has very bad transport policies which put the car ahead of the pedestrian and the cyclist. The rise in households without a car is not reflected by a shift to cycling, which remains almost non-existent locally because of the terrible infrastructure. But then Councillor Loakes recently said that he wanted to make it as easy as possible for local people to use a car to go and buy a loaf of bread or a carton of milk. With someone like him in charge of transport it is not surprising that the local streets are crammed with cars and overweight people driving ridiculously short distances. Tom Thumb

8:34pm Sun 24 Feb 13

mdj says...

'Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%'

But given the large increase in population since, it could well mean an increase in the actual number of cars in the Borough.Many vehicles also have foreign plates.

One can resent the low-grade bullying of motorists in this borough while still agreeing that social policy
should incentivise us to give up our cars. Taxing cars by road footprint rather than engine size is one small approach. Paying for bus transport out of taxation, so that it is free at the point of use by local residents, would have a much bigger effect.
Organising an efficient home delivery service for all local shops would be another.
The late Victorian streets we see choked with parked cars would seem wonderfully spacious again; children could safely play outside in the street, a huge benefit, but of the sort economists struggle to cost.
But that lifestyle depended on a steady stream of trades delivering to homes that were occupied full-time.
We also need a planning regime that
allows workplaces close to dwellings - ie zoning according to nuisance emitted, rather than function - to eliminate the insane distances most of us have to travel.
Schools ringed by small offices and workplaces, so that parents could walk home with their children, would be part of my solution. One can dream...
'Car Ownership - According to census data, in 2001: 45.9% of Waltham Forest households had no car or van, in 2011: 50.8%' But given the large increase in population since, it could well mean an increase in the actual number of cars in the Borough.Many vehicles also have foreign plates. One can resent the low-grade bullying of motorists in this borough while still agreeing that social policy should incentivise us to give up our cars. Taxing cars by road footprint rather than engine size is one small approach. Paying for bus transport out of taxation, so that it is free at the point of use by local residents, would have a much bigger effect. Organising an efficient home delivery service for all local shops would be another. The late Victorian streets we see choked with parked cars would seem wonderfully spacious again; children could safely play outside in the street, a huge benefit, but of the sort economists struggle to cost. But that lifestyle depended on a steady stream of trades delivering to homes that were occupied full-time. We also need a planning regime that allows workplaces close to dwellings - ie zoning according to nuisance emitted, rather than function - to eliminate the insane distances most of us have to travel. Schools ringed by small offices and workplaces, so that parents could walk home with their children, would be part of my solution. One can dream... mdj

10:24am Mon 25 Feb 13

myopinioncounts says...

For a while we had ruling that no new home could be built without off an road parking space, now this no longer applies and we have existing garages turned into 'homes', and high density developments like the one in Elmfield Road, Walthamstow where there is not even 'off road' space for the wheelie bins of the upstairs flats!
For a while we had ruling that no new home could be built without off an road parking space, now this no longer applies and we have existing garages turned into 'homes', and high density developments like the one in Elmfield Road, Walthamstow where there is not even 'off road' space for the wheelie bins of the upstairs flats! myopinioncounts

2:42pm Mon 25 Feb 13

red37red says...

i knew this will happen..
i knew this will happen.. red37red

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