Study may lead to housing plan review

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: The report was commissioned by Epping Forest District Council The report was commissioned by Epping Forest District Council

The population of Epping Forest will increase by about 13,000 in ten years, a report has predicted.

The study, commissioned by Epping Forest District Council, was presented to the cabinet on Tuesday and concluded there would be 6,000 fewer people living in the district by 2023 than previous projections.

Previous predictions had been based on the 2001 census but the latest report included data from the national survey taken in 2011.

Because of the lower predicted growth, the authority may now propose fewer houses in the new Local Plan.

Previous estimates had called for 10,000 homes to be built in the district in the next 20 years, leading to concern over development on green belt land.

But Richard Bassett, planning portfolio holder, said there was still urgent need for new homes.

“I am pleased to see our new forecast still comes out significantly lower than the earlier projections produced before the 2011 census," he added.

“Even if no new families moved into the district, the fact that we are generally living longer and in smaller households means we would need more homes.”

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:22am Thu 5 Dec 13

pan says...

I wonder exactly how many homes are then needed for the scenario outlined by Richard Bassett

“Even if no new families moved into the district, the fact that we are generally living longer and in smaller households means we would need more homes.”

What are the figures then? You should not and can not use sweeping generalisations and opinion to justify local plans. Trends change, alter and vary so what percentage of the homes planned to be built are to alleviate the "crisis" mentioned in this scenario?

If the figures are significant as one can only assume they must be or they wouldn't be brought into consideration for this issue then there are different approaches to be considered.

If living longer and staying on in smaller households is the trend affecting the housing shortage then rather than focussing on expansion at one end of the market such as first time buyers or people moving in to be catered for maybe we should be looking at proper later retirement and old age accommodation?

Look towards a new trend of proper retirement developments. Rather than palming off these to ruthless businesses to be run at a profit maybe we should be addressing the issue in a different way. If homes or sheltered housing schemes were more enticing and offered a positive new stage in life rather than Gods waiting room, trends might reverse thus alleviating some of the pressure on the housing stock.

If we are to be living longer then this issue is probably more pressing than incomers to an area and expanding population. Providing retirement developments I would expect to be more in keeping with town expansion and making desirable developments focussing on the needs of pensioners to enhance their quality of life might just change the trend and perception of clinging on to larger homes of which are under accommodated because of the fear of nursing homes and so on.

People are living longer but also they are not ageing as quickly, many pensioners still enjoy an active social life, still go about their daily routines for much longer now so there is a chasm between retirement and needing nursing.

Developments that focus on smaller houses or bungalows with the older population in mind, security, access, good transport links and facilities and so on without the appearance of being sheltered housing could entice a large proportion of people to consider moving on to benefit themselves.

Concentrate on the issues and needs facing the existing residents of our towns rather than second guessing figures that are obviously to variable to plan correctly for.
I wonder exactly how many homes are then needed for the scenario outlined by Richard Bassett “Even if no new families moved into the district, the fact that we are generally living longer and in smaller households means we would need more homes.” What are the figures then? You should not and can not use sweeping generalisations and opinion to justify local plans. Trends change, alter and vary so what percentage of the homes planned to be built are to alleviate the "crisis" mentioned in this scenario? If the figures are significant as one can only assume they must be or they wouldn't be brought into consideration for this issue then there are different approaches to be considered. If living longer and staying on in smaller households is the trend affecting the housing shortage then rather than focussing on expansion at one end of the market such as first time buyers or people moving in to be catered for maybe we should be looking at proper later retirement and old age accommodation? Look towards a new trend of proper retirement developments. Rather than palming off these to ruthless businesses to be run at a profit maybe we should be addressing the issue in a different way. If homes or sheltered housing schemes were more enticing and offered a positive new stage in life rather than Gods waiting room, trends might reverse thus alleviating some of the pressure on the housing stock. If we are to be living longer then this issue is probably more pressing than incomers to an area and expanding population. Providing retirement developments I would expect to be more in keeping with town expansion and making desirable developments focussing on the needs of pensioners to enhance their quality of life might just change the trend and perception of clinging on to larger homes of which are under accommodated because of the fear of nursing homes and so on. People are living longer but also they are not ageing as quickly, many pensioners still enjoy an active social life, still go about their daily routines for much longer now so there is a chasm between retirement and needing nursing. Developments that focus on smaller houses or bungalows with the older population in mind, security, access, good transport links and facilities and so on without the appearance of being sheltered housing could entice a large proportion of people to consider moving on to benefit themselves. Concentrate on the issues and needs facing the existing residents of our towns rather than second guessing figures that are obviously to variable to plan correctly for. pan

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree