NHS England has spoken out after the CQC heavily criticised Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospital NHS Trust.

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: King George Hospital in Goodmayes King George Hospital in Goodmayes

A failing hospital trust will not undergo any major changes until it meets national standards, NHS England has stated.

Last month the CQC released a damning report after finding that patients were being put at risk at Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospital NHS Trust.

And last week it was decided that the Trust should be placed into special measures.

The health and social care watchdog inspectors found that bosses at the trust have failed to deal with a number of long-standing issues and exposed unsafe care in A&E departments at both King George Hospital in Goodmayes and Queens Hospital in Romford.

A spokesperson for NHS England in London has told the Guardian that the trust will answer concerns over population growth before any changes are made.

He said: “We agree with placing the Trust under special measures.  Whilst we are pleased that the CQC found signs of sustained improvement, this has not yet been achieved in all areas.

“Changes to A&E services will only take place when Care Commissioning Groups in Barking and Dagenham, Havering and Redbridge are confident that it is safe to do so.  This means that there must be sufficient capacity at Queen’s Hospital to care for more patients. 

“Under the plans agreed by the Secretary of State, A&E services and the urgent care centre will be expanded. This would see a 24/7 service for patients with minor injuries.

"Bringing A&E staff together in one larger centre will also make it easier to be seen by a senior consultant more quickly.  Clinical evidence shows that this can dramatically improve the quality of emergency care for patients.”

Comments (2)

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2:42pm Fri 27 Dec 13

geofflh says...

Unfortunately for the local population, the plans to centralise A&E operations are still flawed. This is because of several reasons:
1. To provide a two-tier service (A&E or Urgent Care Centres) put the onus on the local public to decide which option to go to. If they choose Urgent Care when in fact their need is better addressed by A&E, vaulable time is lost in transferring them from one to the other. On the other hand, always opting for A&E means that such centres will be over-subscribed. In general, the public are not best placed to make this decision.
2. To centralise A&E in one location (presumably Queens Hospital in Romford) might improve the situation for the staff - but the public will have further to travel in order to attend the A&E. This is not helpful either for reaching the centre in the first place nor for subsequent rehabilitation - which is generally acknowledged to improve when the patient is closer to their home.
All in all, it seems that the chanes being proposed are solely for the benefit of cost reduction and staff - but at the expense of the local population. No wonder that the NHS is in crisis!
Unfortunately for the local population, the plans to centralise A&E operations are still flawed. This is because of several reasons: 1. To provide a two-tier service (A&E or Urgent Care Centres) put the onus on the local public to decide which option to go to. If they choose Urgent Care when in fact their need is better addressed by A&E, vaulable time is lost in transferring them from one to the other. On the other hand, always opting for A&E means that such centres will be over-subscribed. In general, the public are not best placed to make this decision. 2. To centralise A&E in one location (presumably Queens Hospital in Romford) might improve the situation for the staff - but the public will have further to travel in order to attend the A&E. This is not helpful either for reaching the centre in the first place nor for subsequent rehabilitation - which is generally acknowledged to improve when the patient is closer to their home. All in all, it seems that the chanes being proposed are solely for the benefit of cost reduction and staff - but at the expense of the local population. No wonder that the NHS is in crisis! geofflh

11:51pm Fri 27 Dec 13

MorrisHickey says...

It's all part of the chaotic cockup over which Averil Jobsworth presides.
It's all part of the chaotic cockup over which Averil Jobsworth presides. MorrisHickey

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