Historic Highstone restored

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: From left: Colin Cronin, Cllr Chris Cummins, Cllr Sue Nolan, resident Helen Johnson, English Heritage rep Miriam Swan, Cllr Michelle Dunn and Cllr Thomas Chan From left: Colin Cronin, Cllr Chris Cummins, Cllr Sue Nolan, resident Helen Johnson, English Heritage rep Miriam Swan, Cllr Michelle Dunn and Cllr Thomas Chan

A historic stone has been unveiled following a restoration.

The Highstone at the junction of Hollybush Hill and New Wanstead in Snaresbrook, and was used as a mile-marker displaying distances between Hyde Park Corner and various locations around Epping Forest.

Erected in the 1800s, residents have been campaigning for more than three years for the landmark to be restored after extensive erosion left its markings hard to read.

Due to more recent boundary changes, the stone is now officially situated in Redbridge, after previously being in Waltham Forest.

Comments (8)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

4:26pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Villagecranberry says...

I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines.

They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.
I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines. They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects. Villagecranberry

4:29pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Villagecranberry says...

I forgot to add that now it has been identified as an important historical land mark and illuminated, how long it will be before it gets vandalised as usual like the crouching leaf man of Leytonstone that is next to the old Lloyd's Bank and was reduced to powder not long ago and cost another 20k to replace.
I forgot to add that now it has been identified as an important historical land mark and illuminated, how long it will be before it gets vandalised as usual like the crouching leaf man of Leytonstone that is next to the old Lloyd's Bank and was reduced to powder not long ago and cost another 20k to replace. Villagecranberry

7:41pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Wanstead Watcher says...

It's a shame Villagecranberry is consistently negative! Preserving these historic monuments for future generations is important or would he rather they were left to decay into ruin? I've also heard it was half funded by English Heritage (which must have some truth given the rep in the photo) so I'd suggest doing your homework before spewing your verbal diahorrea in future!
It's a shame Villagecranberry is consistently negative! Preserving these historic monuments for future generations is important or would he rather they were left to decay into ruin? I've also heard it was half funded by English Heritage (which must have some truth given the rep in the photo) so I'd suggest doing your homework before spewing your verbal diahorrea in future! Wanstead Watcher

11:50pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Villagecranberry says...

Wanstead Watcher wrote:
It's a shame Villagecranberry is consistently negative! Preserving these historic monuments for future generations is important or would he rather they were left to decay into ruin? I've also heard it was half funded by English Heritage (which must have some truth given the rep in the photo) so I'd suggest doing your homework before spewing your verbal diahorrea in future!
No, I want them preserved but not in secrecy. How much did this cost and if it is to be preserved, let's preserve it in a safer place?

Where it is situated stood a marvellous house, now replaced by a monstrosity, 60's built rubbish block. I would rather have the house not a sign post but better still both!

I am on your side!
[quote][p][bold]Wanstead Watcher[/bold] wrote: It's a shame Villagecranberry is consistently negative! Preserving these historic monuments for future generations is important or would he rather they were left to decay into ruin? I've also heard it was half funded by English Heritage (which must have some truth given the rep in the photo) so I'd suggest doing your homework before spewing your verbal diahorrea in future![/p][/quote]No, I want them preserved but not in secrecy. How much did this cost and if it is to be preserved, let's preserve it in a safer place? Where it is situated stood a marvellous house, now replaced by a monstrosity, 60's built rubbish block. I would rather have the house not a sign post but better still both! I am on your side! Villagecranberry

1:34pm Sat 1 Feb 14

Helen, Walthamstow says...

Villagecranberry wrote:
I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines.

They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.
There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again.
[quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines. They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.[/p][/quote]There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again. Helen, Walthamstow

10:28am Sun 2 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

Helen, Walthamstow wrote:
Villagecranberry wrote:
I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines.

They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.
There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again.
There is conflicting stories about our great Hitchcock, which biography do you suggest? The is evidence that he resided like you say near the pie and mash shop at Harrow Green but why would the council refuse the South Africans who own the Hitchcock Hotel permission to enable the erection of the statue of Alfred Hitchcock in the car park in his memory? This was to be paid for at their own expense and whilst you maintain he had nothing to do with the Hotel, some older residents nearby have memories going back of affiliations to the stretch of. Whips cross Road where he possibly lived for a short while as there were some film studios near whips cross roundabout near the Lambs Whistle Stop Cafe and Kiosk where the bus drivers stopped had lunch and turned the buses around. The Terrortotial Army Camp opposite has historical buildings where Alfred built on ideas for films and scenes, possible like North by the North. West and Rear Room Window? Either way, like the Highstone, he should be honoured as like William Morris he is a borough treasure and I wish the council would recognise this.
[quote][p][bold]Helen, Walthamstow[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines. They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.[/p][/quote]There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again.[/p][/quote]There is conflicting stories about our great Hitchcock, which biography do you suggest? The is evidence that he resided like you say near the pie and mash shop at Harrow Green but why would the council refuse the South Africans who own the Hitchcock Hotel permission to enable the erection of the statue of Alfred Hitchcock in the car park in his memory? This was to be paid for at their own expense and whilst you maintain he had nothing to do with the Hotel, some older residents nearby have memories going back of affiliations to the stretch of. Whips cross Road where he possibly lived for a short while as there were some film studios near whips cross roundabout near the Lambs Whistle Stop Cafe and Kiosk where the bus drivers stopped had lunch and turned the buses around. The Terrortotial Army Camp opposite has historical buildings where Alfred built on ideas for films and scenes, possible like North by the North. West and Rear Room Window? Either way, like the Highstone, he should be honoured as like William Morris he is a borough treasure and I wish the council would recognise this. Villagecranberry

2:33pm Sun 2 Feb 14

Helen, Walthamstow says...

Villagecranberry wrote:
Helen, Walthamstow wrote:
Villagecranberry wrote:
I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines.

They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.
There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again.
There is conflicting stories about our great Hitchcock, which biography do you suggest? The is evidence that he resided like you say near the pie and mash shop at Harrow Green but why would the council refuse the South Africans who own the Hitchcock Hotel permission to enable the erection of the statue of Alfred Hitchcock in the car park in his memory? This was to be paid for at their own expense and whilst you maintain he had nothing to do with the Hotel, some older residents nearby have memories going back of affiliations to the stretch of. Whips cross Road where he possibly lived for a short while as there were some film studios near whips cross roundabout near the Lambs Whistle Stop Cafe and Kiosk where the bus drivers stopped had lunch and turned the buses around. The Terrortotial Army Camp opposite has historical buildings where Alfred built on ideas for films and scenes, possible like North by the North. West and Rear Room Window? Either way, like the Highstone, he should be honoured as like William Morris he is a borough treasure and I wish the council would recognise this.
Like I said, you are making it up as you go along.

Hitchcock never worked in any of the Ŵood Street film studios. His interest in cinema developed while he was working for an engineering company, and film title boards he developed landed him his first job at the age of 21 at the Islington studios of American company Famous Players-Lasky (later Paramount). He directed his first film five years later and none of the British studios he worked for were anywhere near Whipps Cross. Nor did he live at or near Whipps Cross. His family left Leytonstone after his father when Alfred was 14.

The only local influence he ever personally acknowledged was an episode when his father sent him across the road to the police station in Leytonstone High Roàd to be locked up for a short while as punishment for a misdemeanour. It is said to have developed his hatred of false imprisonment and injustice, both of which influenced his films.

Biography - Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light by Patrick McGilligan (2004). Alternatively, if that's too much for you to get through, there is a useful booklet memoir available at Vestry House Museum and other local outlets.
[quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Helen, Walthamstow[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines. They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.[/p][/quote]There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again.[/p][/quote]There is conflicting stories about our great Hitchcock, which biography do you suggest? The is evidence that he resided like you say near the pie and mash shop at Harrow Green but why would the council refuse the South Africans who own the Hitchcock Hotel permission to enable the erection of the statue of Alfred Hitchcock in the car park in his memory? This was to be paid for at their own expense and whilst you maintain he had nothing to do with the Hotel, some older residents nearby have memories going back of affiliations to the stretch of. Whips cross Road where he possibly lived for a short while as there were some film studios near whips cross roundabout near the Lambs Whistle Stop Cafe and Kiosk where the bus drivers stopped had lunch and turned the buses around. The Terrortotial Army Camp opposite has historical buildings where Alfred built on ideas for films and scenes, possible like North by the North. West and Rear Room Window? Either way, like the Highstone, he should be honoured as like William Morris he is a borough treasure and I wish the council would recognise this.[/p][/quote]Like I said, you are making it up as you go along. Hitchcock never worked in any of the Ŵood Street film studios. His interest in cinema developed while he was working for an engineering company, and film title boards he developed landed him his first job at the age of 21 at the Islington studios of American company Famous Players-Lasky (later Paramount). He directed his first film five years later and none of the British studios he worked for were anywhere near Whipps Cross. Nor did he live at or near Whipps Cross. His family left Leytonstone after his father when Alfred was 14. The only local influence he ever personally acknowledged was an episode when his father sent him across the road to the police station in Leytonstone High Roàd to be locked up for a short while as punishment for a misdemeanour. It is said to have developed his hatred of false imprisonment and injustice, both of which influenced his films. Biography - Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light by Patrick McGilligan (2004). Alternatively, if that's too much for you to get through, there is a useful booklet memoir available at Vestry House Museum and other local outlets. Helen, Walthamstow

10:24pm Sun 2 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

Helen, Walthamstow wrote:
Villagecranberry wrote:
Helen, Walthamstow wrote:
Villagecranberry wrote:
I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines.

They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.
There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again.
There is conflicting stories about our great Hitchcock, which biography do you suggest? The is evidence that he resided like you say near the pie and mash shop at Harrow Green but why would the council refuse the South Africans who own the Hitchcock Hotel permission to enable the erection of the statue of Alfred Hitchcock in the car park in his memory? This was to be paid for at their own expense and whilst you maintain he had nothing to do with the Hotel, some older residents nearby have memories going back of affiliations to the stretch of. Whips cross Road where he possibly lived for a short while as there were some film studios near whips cross roundabout near the Lambs Whistle Stop Cafe and Kiosk where the bus drivers stopped had lunch and turned the buses around. The Terrortotial Army Camp opposite has historical buildings where Alfred built on ideas for films and scenes, possible like North by the North. West and Rear Room Window? Either way, like the Highstone, he should be honoured as like William Morris he is a borough treasure and I wish the council would recognise this.
Like I said, you are making it up as you go along.

Hitchcock never worked in any of the Ŵood Street film studios. His interest in cinema developed while he was working for an engineering company, and film title boards he developed landed him his first job at the age of 21 at the Islington studios of American company Famous Players-Lasky (later Paramount). He directed his first film five years later and none of the British studios he worked for were anywhere near Whipps Cross. Nor did he live at or near Whipps Cross. His family left Leytonstone after his father when Alfred was 14.

The only local influence he ever personally acknowledged was an episode when his father sent him across the road to the police station in Leytonstone High Roàd to be locked up for a short while as punishment for a misdemeanour. It is said to have developed his hatred of false imprisonment and injustice, both of which influenced his films.

Biography - Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light by Patrick McGilligan (2004). Alternatively, if that's too much for you to get through, there is a useful booklet memoir available at Vestry House Museum and other local outlets.
Thank you, I must try and read this book. I have seen probably most of his films. I have been meaning to take another trip to Vestry House in any event. It is a shame that this world famous producer is not honoured more by the borough though, I bet he would be in any other borough or country for that matter.
[quote][p][bold]Helen, Walthamstow[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Helen, Walthamstow[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: I was always told that this was the 'Leytonstone' and was where Hitchcock first had an idea for his film career, was a long time ago when an old boy told me, I cannot remember what he said exactly but it was along those lines. They have been working on that for months, I am scared to ask what that cost but I wager it runs into hundreds of thousands courtesy of the well known local builder with many links to big projects.[/p][/quote]There you go again, cornbeefur - spewing out your usual nonsense about Hitchcock. You just make is up as you go along. Read a biography or two before you do it again.[/p][/quote]There is conflicting stories about our great Hitchcock, which biography do you suggest? The is evidence that he resided like you say near the pie and mash shop at Harrow Green but why would the council refuse the South Africans who own the Hitchcock Hotel permission to enable the erection of the statue of Alfred Hitchcock in the car park in his memory? This was to be paid for at their own expense and whilst you maintain he had nothing to do with the Hotel, some older residents nearby have memories going back of affiliations to the stretch of. Whips cross Road where he possibly lived for a short while as there were some film studios near whips cross roundabout near the Lambs Whistle Stop Cafe and Kiosk where the bus drivers stopped had lunch and turned the buses around. The Terrortotial Army Camp opposite has historical buildings where Alfred built on ideas for films and scenes, possible like North by the North. West and Rear Room Window? Either way, like the Highstone, he should be honoured as like William Morris he is a borough treasure and I wish the council would recognise this.[/p][/quote]Like I said, you are making it up as you go along. Hitchcock never worked in any of the Ŵood Street film studios. His interest in cinema developed while he was working for an engineering company, and film title boards he developed landed him his first job at the age of 21 at the Islington studios of American company Famous Players-Lasky (later Paramount). He directed his first film five years later and none of the British studios he worked for were anywhere near Whipps Cross. Nor did he live at or near Whipps Cross. His family left Leytonstone after his father when Alfred was 14. The only local influence he ever personally acknowledged was an episode when his father sent him across the road to the police station in Leytonstone High Roàd to be locked up for a short while as punishment for a misdemeanour. It is said to have developed his hatred of false imprisonment and injustice, both of which influenced his films. Biography - Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light by Patrick McGilligan (2004). Alternatively, if that's too much for you to get through, there is a useful booklet memoir available at Vestry House Museum and other local outlets.[/p][/quote]Thank you, I must try and read this book. I have seen probably most of his films. I have been meaning to take another trip to Vestry House in any event. It is a shame that this world famous producer is not honoured more by the borough though, I bet he would be in any other borough or country for that matter. Villagecranberry

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree