Motorists advised to use caution in Chingford

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: A driver negotiates the flooded area of Sewardstone Road in Chingford. A driver negotiates the flooded area of Sewardstone Road in Chingford.

Motorists are advised to use caution while driving as some roads are flooded.

There is currently a traffic alert for northbound traffic on Sewardstone Road in Chingford.

Part of the road is flooded at Hawkswood Crescent.

There are also reports of flooded roads in nearby Waltham Abbey.

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:42am Fri 7 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

Roads flooded but they still drive through at full pelt on bikes in cars and old canoes they found in the garage.
Roads flooded but they still drive through at full pelt on bikes in cars and old canoes they found in the garage. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -10

4:35pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Thunderbird4 says...

It looks worse than it is because the car is going through the water, a little fast, and causing a wake that masks part of the wheel, thus making the water appear to be quite deep.

I've been through flood water in Sewardstone Road, back in the late '80's, where it came up to the door and over the exhaust pipe - that's when you go slow and don't take your foot of the accelerator; if you do, the water gets sucked up the exhaust and might reach the engine, which would be bad news.
It looks worse than it is because the car is going through the water, a little fast, and causing a wake that masks part of the wheel, thus making the water appear to be quite deep. I've been through flood water in Sewardstone Road, back in the late '80's, where it came up to the door and over the exhaust pipe - that's when you go slow and don't take your foot of the accelerator; if you do, the water gets sucked up the exhaust and might reach the engine, which would be bad news. Thunderbird4
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

Thunderbird4 wrote:
It looks worse than it is because the car is going through the water, a little fast, and causing a wake that masks part of the wheel, thus making the water appear to be quite deep.

I've been through flood water in Sewardstone Road, back in the late '80's, where it came up to the door and over the exhaust pipe - that's when you go slow and don't take your foot of the accelerator; if you do, the water gets sucked up the exhaust and might reach the engine, which would be bad news.
How can the water get sucked up the engine?

The exhaust is what it is an exhaust.

The splashing by driving too fast through it is the problem as it gets up the engine block and shorts out the electrics
[quote][p][bold]Thunderbird4[/bold] wrote: It looks worse than it is because the car is going through the water, a little fast, and causing a wake that masks part of the wheel, thus making the water appear to be quite deep. I've been through flood water in Sewardstone Road, back in the late '80's, where it came up to the door and over the exhaust pipe - that's when you go slow and don't take your foot of the accelerator; if you do, the water gets sucked up the exhaust and might reach the engine, which would be bad news.[/p][/quote]How can the water get sucked up the engine? The exhaust is what it is an exhaust. The splashing by driving too fast through it is the problem as it gets up the engine block and shorts out the electrics Villagecranberry
  • Score: -5

7:06pm Fri 7 Feb 14

escapefrome17 says...

Ther damage is done when water enters through the engines air intake, not the exhaust., the problem being that water gets sucked in through the intake, it's not compressible, and the result is bent conrods. Modern engines tend to have low intakes which is why they're so easily susceptible to damage in relatively shallow floods.
Ther damage is done when water enters through the engines air intake, not the exhaust., the problem being that water gets sucked in through the intake, it's not compressible, and the result is bent conrods. Modern engines tend to have low intakes which is why they're so easily susceptible to damage in relatively shallow floods. escapefrome17
  • Score: 0

12:37am Sat 8 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

escapefrome17 wrote:
Ther damage is done when water enters through the engines air intake, not the exhaust., the problem being that water gets sucked in through the intake, it's not compressible, and the result is bent conrods. Modern engines tend to have low intakes which is why they're so easily susceptible to damage in relatively shallow floods.
What I said?
[quote][p][bold]escapefrome17[/bold] wrote: Ther damage is done when water enters through the engines air intake, not the exhaust., the problem being that water gets sucked in through the intake, it's not compressible, and the result is bent conrods. Modern engines tend to have low intakes which is why they're so easily susceptible to damage in relatively shallow floods.[/p][/quote]What I said? Villagecranberry
  • Score: -1

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree