Rare birds take up residence in neighbourhood

Rare birds take up residence in neighbourhood

The Ring-necked Parakeets in a tree in Woodford Green

It is believed the population of birds come from their release from captivity

Rare birds take up residence in neighbourhood

First published in News
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

Around 25 parrots took up residence in a neighbourhood tree over the weekend.

The Ring-necked Parakeets were seen eating fruit in a tree at Arlington Road, Woodford Green.

The Guardian photographer, who lives nearby, said: “They seem to have taken up residence in the tree two houses down from where I live. They are eating the fruit on the tree and are very noisy.”

There are myths on how the species came to be naturalised in England.

One that they broke out of airport quarantine, and another that they escaped from the set of 1951 film, The African Queen.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs believe the population dates only from 1969, when birds were released from captivity.

Comments (9)

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2:25pm Mon 24 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

Cheaper than buying one from the pets shop and less upkeep.
Cheaper than buying one from the pets shop and less upkeep. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -11

5:43pm Mon 24 Feb 14

snacker says...

Villagecranberry wrote:
Cheaper than buying one from the pets shop and less upkeep.
DEFRA suggests 1969 as the date these birds settled in the UK. You missed a trick Yaaawnnnbeefur, you could've blamed Harold Wilson's Labour Government's immigration policy.
[quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: Cheaper than buying one from the pets shop and less upkeep.[/p][/quote]DEFRA suggests 1969 as the date these birds settled in the UK. You missed a trick Yaaawnnnbeefur, you could've blamed Harold Wilson's Labour Government's immigration policy. snacker
  • Score: 0

8:19pm Mon 24 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

It is nice that one can go and observe these creatures of God in a natural setting rather than in a tiny cage hunched up on a perch , with stagnant water and a food tray long unwashed with dirty Trill, whilst they look at a soiled mirror out of corner of an eye thinking 'who is a pretty boy, Polly, Polly Parrot'. These lovely birds are a sight when they sit in the trees preening away like their life depended on it and I urge all parents to take their children to see this awesome wonder before the catapult armed feral, unruly uncontrollable youths make them fly away.
It is nice that one can go and observe these creatures of God in a natural setting rather than in a tiny cage hunched up on a perch , with stagnant water and a food tray long unwashed with dirty Trill, whilst they look at a soiled mirror out of corner of an eye thinking 'who is a pretty boy, Polly, Polly Parrot'. These lovely birds are a sight when they sit in the trees preening away like their life depended on it and I urge all parents to take their children to see this awesome wonder before the catapult armed feral, unruly uncontrollable youths make them fly away. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -2

9:03pm Mon 24 Feb 14

Dave mp says...

Villagecranberry wrote:
It is nice that one can go and observe these creatures of God in a natural setting rather than in a tiny cage hunched up on a perch , with stagnant water and a food tray long unwashed with dirty Trill, whilst they look at a soiled mirror out of corner of an eye thinking 'who is a pretty boy, Polly, Polly Parrot'. These lovely birds are a sight when they sit in the trees preening away like their life depended on it and I urge all parents to take their children to see this awesome wonder before the catapult armed feral, unruly uncontrollable youths make them fly away.
On a recent trip to Battersea Park my partner and i witnessed parrots like this throughout the park.
[quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: It is nice that one can go and observe these creatures of God in a natural setting rather than in a tiny cage hunched up on a perch , with stagnant water and a food tray long unwashed with dirty Trill, whilst they look at a soiled mirror out of corner of an eye thinking 'who is a pretty boy, Polly, Polly Parrot'. These lovely birds are a sight when they sit in the trees preening away like their life depended on it and I urge all parents to take their children to see this awesome wonder before the catapult armed feral, unruly uncontrollable youths make them fly away.[/p][/quote]On a recent trip to Battersea Park my partner and i witnessed parrots like this throughout the park. Dave mp
  • Score: 5

9:06pm Mon 24 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

Dave mp wrote:
Villagecranberry wrote:
It is nice that one can go and observe these creatures of God in a natural setting rather than in a tiny cage hunched up on a perch , with stagnant water and a food tray long unwashed with dirty Trill, whilst they look at a soiled mirror out of corner of an eye thinking 'who is a pretty boy, Polly, Polly Parrot'. These lovely birds are a sight when they sit in the trees preening away like their life depended on it and I urge all parents to take their children to see this awesome wonder before the catapult armed feral, unruly uncontrollable youths make them fly away.
On a recent trip to Battersea Park my partner and i witnessed parrots like this throughout the park.
Another nice natural setting for them no doubt and bet they were much happier than trapped.
[quote][p][bold]Dave mp[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: It is nice that one can go and observe these creatures of God in a natural setting rather than in a tiny cage hunched up on a perch , with stagnant water and a food tray long unwashed with dirty Trill, whilst they look at a soiled mirror out of corner of an eye thinking 'who is a pretty boy, Polly, Polly Parrot'. These lovely birds are a sight when they sit in the trees preening away like their life depended on it and I urge all parents to take their children to see this awesome wonder before the catapult armed feral, unruly uncontrollable youths make them fly away.[/p][/quote]On a recent trip to Battersea Park my partner and i witnessed parrots like this throughout the park.[/p][/quote]Another nice natural setting for them no doubt and bet they were much happier than trapped. Villagecranberry
  • Score: 0

6:40am Tue 25 Feb 14

Villagecranberry says...

Yellow bird,
Up high in banana tree,
Yellow bird,
You sit all alone like me

Did your lady frien',
Leave de nest again?
Dat is very sad,
Make me feel so bad,
You can fly away,
In the sky away,
Before de Department of Rural Affairs come and get thee
Yellow bird, Up high in banana tree, Yellow bird, You sit all alone like me Did your lady frien', Leave de nest again? Dat is very sad, Make me feel so bad, You can fly away, In the sky away, Before de Department of Rural Affairs come and get thee Villagecranberry
  • Score: -3

5:12pm Wed 26 Feb 14

myopinioncounts says...

Rare? They are spreading quite quickly and there has been a large colony in Springfield Park (by the River Lea) for some time. It is said that they are a threat to native species.
Rare? They are spreading quite quickly and there has been a large colony in Springfield Park (by the River Lea) for some time. It is said that they are a threat to native species. myopinioncounts
  • Score: 1

4:37pm Thu 27 Feb 14

nostalgichabitual says...

Can't be awfully rare, saw one flying into wanstead flats a couple months back and sure me and my partner saw one (could of been the same one) a couple months before that! Also doing a bit of research as snacker has previously commented, apparently they have been known to the London and Kent area since the sixties.
Can't be awfully rare, saw one flying into wanstead flats a couple months back and sure me and my partner saw one (could of been the same one) a couple months before that! Also doing a bit of research as snacker has previously commented, apparently they have been known to the London and Kent area since the sixties. nostalgichabitual
  • Score: 0

11:09pm Fri 28 Feb 14

westside_o says...

They aren't that rare.
I see a flock of at least 200 in 2-3 waves flying over every morning.
They aren't that rare. I see a flock of at least 200 in 2-3 waves flying over every morning. westside_o
  • Score: 0

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