Drivers call for action against Woodford Green bollard causing accidents

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Judy Nathan and father Cyril Needleman with the bollard causing accidents Judy Nathan and father Cyril Needleman with the bollard causing accidents

Drivers are calling for action over a permanent traffic bollard they claim is unsafe.

The bollard at the junction of High Elms and Elm Grove in Woodford Green was installed in April last year to stop drivers cutting across the pavement.

But drivers have suffered damage to their cars after hitting the bollard, claiming it is difficult to see.

Redbridge Council has rejected any claim for compensation for damage relating to the bollard.

Repairs costing £2,000 were needed to Vicky Babbs' car when she scrapped along the bollard to avoid another vehicle.

The 45-year old of Forest Road said: "I couldn’t see it. The road is on a gradient, if anyone tries to hug the kerb it is impossible to see.

"Drivers use the entire road as it is very narrow. It should not be there. If the council know about this damage being caused then why are they not doing anything about it?"

Judy Nathan, 51, Beech Lane, Buckhurst Hill was driving with her father, Cyril Needleman, 84, in the car when they crashed into the bollard last November.

She has also hit out at Redbridge Council's lack of action.

Ms Nathan said: "The bell shaped bollard is not visible to drivers who pull up to the junction. When there is another vehicle wanting to make a turn, it is all too easy to scrape along the bollard.

"I think this is unacceptable, we pay tax to Redbridge Council but they are showing a complete disregard for us or anyone else using the junction."

The issue came to the fore in June last year when a van got stuck on the bollard as he attempted to pull out of the junction.

Warning signs were proposed but these plans fell through.

A Redbridge Council spokesman said: "The Council has no plans to remove the bollard in question.

"We would once again state the fact that this bollard is on the pavement and that it is not possible to hit the bollard unless a motorist drives or manoeuvres their car across the pavement, a practice that simply should not be taking place.

"The bollard was put in place entirely to stop this practice as driving on the footway puts pedestrians safety and private property at risk."

Comments (12)

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9:06am Mon 10 Mar 14

SillyCnut says...

Isn't that the whole point of the bollard? I would like to see more of them to stop the ignoramuses who park all over grass verges and up pavements.
Isn't that the whole point of the bollard? I would like to see more of them to stop the ignoramuses who park all over grass verges and up pavements. SillyCnut
  • Score: 6

9:50am Mon 10 Mar 14

LakeBreeze says...

Would a better solution be a metre of that car-high grey metal fencing, ending where the bollard now stands, which would still allow pedestrians access but would be a physical barrier to vehicles, whose drivers will be able to clearly see the metal fence from a car window thus be aware there is a physical object to avoid?
Would a better solution be a metre of that car-high grey metal fencing, ending where the bollard now stands, which would still allow pedestrians access but would be a physical barrier to vehicles, whose drivers will be able to clearly see the metal fence from a car window thus be aware there is a physical object to avoid? LakeBreeze
  • Score: 1

10:20am Mon 10 Mar 14

TTMAN says...

Keep off the pavement, simple. You hit it your fault, it's static unless they have deployed the Mk1 robotic pavement bollard, then that is a whole new game!
Keep off the pavement, simple. You hit it your fault, it's static unless they have deployed the Mk1 robotic pavement bollard, then that is a whole new game! TTMAN
  • Score: 7

10:34am Mon 10 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

The bollard is doing its job, there were cars driving on the foot way potentially maiming people. If drivers cannot see it they should go to specsavers.
The bollard is doing its job, there were cars driving on the foot way potentially maiming people. If drivers cannot see it they should go to specsavers. Villagecranberry
  • Score: 7

10:50am Mon 10 Mar 14

xxxdave says...

The pavement s not a short cut for cars, I hope councils install more of these as they are cheaper and a good detterant to keep cars off the Pavements..... When I learnt to Drive I was tought that cars are for roads not Pavements there is total lack of respect for pavements these days....
The pavement s not a short cut for cars, I hope councils install more of these as they are cheaper and a good detterant to keep cars off the Pavements..... When I learnt to Drive I was tought that cars are for roads not Pavements there is total lack of respect for pavements these days.... xxxdave
  • Score: 7

10:59am Mon 10 Mar 14

Paul Skinner says...

Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.
Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed. Paul Skinner
  • Score: -5

1:31pm Mon 10 Mar 14

SillyCnut says...

Paul Skinner wrote:
Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.
How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle.
[quote][p][bold]Paul Skinner[/bold] wrote: Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.[/p][/quote]How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle. SillyCnut
  • Score: 4

5:28pm Mon 10 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

SillyCnut wrote:
Paul Skinner wrote:
Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.
How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle.
So that pedestrians can trip over the bollard?
[quote][p][bold]SillyCnut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Paul Skinner[/bold] wrote: Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.[/p][/quote]How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle.[/p][/quote]So that pedestrians can trip over the bollard? Villagecranberry
  • Score: -1

5:35pm Mon 10 Mar 14

Paul Skinner says...

SillyCnut wrote:
Paul Skinner wrote:
Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.
How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle.
If a car were to hug the curb, it is more than possible. Most cars are not *exactly* as wide as the distance between the outside edges of the wheels. They have wheel arches and bodywork outside of this. The longer the vehicle, the higher the chance of scraping along it.

It is at least theoretically possible that a car can legally drive round the corner with all 4 wheels on the road and for parts of the car to clip/scrape the bollard.

Obviously this will be an unpopular fact, but it is nonetheless a fact.
[quote][p][bold]SillyCnut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Paul Skinner[/bold] wrote: Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.[/p][/quote]How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle.[/p][/quote]If a car were to hug the curb, it is more than possible. Most cars are not *exactly* as wide as the distance between the outside edges of the wheels. They have wheel arches and bodywork outside of this. The longer the vehicle, the higher the chance of scraping along it. It is at least theoretically possible that a car can legally drive round the corner with all 4 wheels on the road and for parts of the car to clip/scrape the bollard. Obviously this will be an unpopular fact, but it is nonetheless a fact. Paul Skinner
  • Score: -5

5:37pm Mon 10 Mar 14

Paul Skinner says...

Villagecranberry wrote:
SillyCnut wrote:
Paul Skinner wrote:
Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.
How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle.
So that pedestrians can trip over the bollard?
(Yes, you should of course see it and avoid it, but my argument is that as a deliberate obstacle to avoid people cutting the corner, it is doing above and beyond what it should do)
[quote][p][bold]Villagecranberry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SillyCnut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Paul Skinner[/bold] wrote: Because this bollard is right at the edge of the pavement it is actually possible to scrape along the bollard without your wheels touching the curb. Would this not constitute fault on the council's part? I'd suggest it's probably wise to move it to the back edge of the curb, like most railings, and the other bollard behind in the picture are placed.[/p][/quote]How would that possibly happen? Look at the picture - how can what you said happen? Just the other day I saw some twit in an off-roader park on the pavement as he couldn't be bothered to walk more than 10 yards to the shop. Not wheels up on the pavement, but the whole vehicle.[/p][/quote]So that pedestrians can trip over the bollard?[/p][/quote](Yes, you should of course see it and avoid it, but my argument is that as a deliberate obstacle to avoid people cutting the corner, it is doing above and beyond what it should do) Paul Skinner
  • Score: -1

5:51pm Mon 10 Mar 14

Stevo98 says...

Any driver who claims they "Didn't see" the bollard should be arrested and charged with careless driving. A child is supposed to be able to stand on a pavement and not get killed by a driver too stupid or lazy to look properly. It's extremely scary that there are idiot drivers like Vicky Babbs on our roads.
Any driver who claims they "Didn't see" the bollard should be arrested and charged with careless driving. A child is supposed to be able to stand on a pavement and not get killed by a driver too stupid or lazy to look properly. It's extremely scary that there are idiot drivers like Vicky Babbs on our roads. Stevo98
  • Score: 4

10:39am Tue 11 Mar 14

MrsM2007 says...

Its a very good thing the bollard is there. Its very close to a primary school and my children pass it every day on their way to school. As the pavement is narrow here it is important to make sure cars do not mount the pavement on the corner. It is lazy and inconsiderate driving to do so and I drive past it often and without incident. The bollard is clearly visible and there are absolutely no excuses! I hope the council do not take any notice of these careless drivers.
Its a very good thing the bollard is there. Its very close to a primary school and my children pass it every day on their way to school. As the pavement is narrow here it is important to make sure cars do not mount the pavement on the corner. It is lazy and inconsiderate driving to do so and I drive past it often and without incident. The bollard is clearly visible and there are absolutely no excuses! I hope the council do not take any notice of these careless drivers. MrsM2007
  • Score: 6

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