Shop front improvements at Bakers Arms were seen properly for the first time this week

New shop fronts at Bakers Arms.

New shop fronts at Bakers Arms.

First published in News
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

New shop front improvement works are being revealed this week as scaffolding comes down from in front of buildings at Bakers Arms in Leyton.

Nine sets of high street shop fronts across the borough are being transformed and rejuvenated using a £9m budget set aside for improvements.

The Bakers Arms improvements are the largest, using £3.3m.

Yesterday the shop front improvements in Leyton High Road, carried out for the Olympics, were awarded best non-residential scheme winner at the Waltham Forest Design Awards.

The improved shop fronts were said to put heart back into high streets.

Comments (20)

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3:39pm Thu 13 Mar 14

Dave mp says...

The improved shop fronts were said to put heart back into high streets.
Really?
The improved shop fronts were said to put heart back into high streets. Really? Dave mp
  • Score: 7

4:24pm Thu 13 Mar 14

Thunderbird4 says...

I didn't realise Osbournes paint was so expensive.
I didn't realise Osbournes paint was so expensive. Thunderbird4
  • Score: 4

5:08pm Thu 13 Mar 14

TTMAN says...

Very beach hut. Not sure what they hope to achieve.
Very beach hut. Not sure what they hope to achieve. TTMAN
  • Score: 10

5:41pm Thu 13 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

Painting antique bricks, very conservative, not.
Painting antique bricks, very conservative, not. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -6

10:19pm Thu 13 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

Dave mp wrote:
The improved shop fronts were said to put heart back into high streets.
Really?
A kind of papering over the cracks.
[quote][p][bold]Dave mp[/bold] wrote: The improved shop fronts were said to put heart back into high streets. Really?[/p][/quote]A kind of papering over the cracks. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -8

7:07am Fri 14 Mar 14

stickmanny says...

More use than moaning on a website though.
More use than moaning on a website though. stickmanny
  • Score: 8

10:35am Fri 14 Mar 14

cynicalsue says...

The walls might look nice and bright but I don't like the awful expanse of paving slabs in front of the shops. This is happening all over the borough (Thatched House in Leytonstone for example). Also, the removal of the 'slip road' is delaying the buses and giving them an akward turn in to Lea Bridge Road. Worse still, I'm beginning to sound like Cornbeefur! Help!
The walls might look nice and bright but I don't like the awful expanse of paving slabs in front of the shops. This is happening all over the borough (Thatched House in Leytonstone for example). Also, the removal of the 'slip road' is delaying the buses and giving them an akward turn in to Lea Bridge Road. Worse still, I'm beginning to sound like Cornbeefur! Help! cynicalsue
  • Score: 13

1:10pm Fri 14 Mar 14

SillyCnut says...

there are still the same old rubbish shop fronts. They have just painted the upstairs to look like Ballmory. Pathetic.
there are still the same old rubbish shop fronts. They have just painted the upstairs to look like Ballmory. Pathetic. SillyCnut
  • Score: -1

1:58pm Fri 14 Mar 14

topnote says...

My house could do with some fresh paint, I wonder will it qualify for regeneration?
My house could do with some fresh paint, I wonder will it qualify for regeneration? topnote
  • Score: 5

2:21pm Fri 14 Mar 14

Debbie2312 says...

For risk of upsetting a few people. Yes, the area looked very run down and Yes, it was in need of a much needed makeover, but businesses should be made to keep there own shop front and flats above maintained themselves. I don't believe this should have come out of tax payers pockets The businesses themselves should have contributed on that part. Sad thing is many of the businesses and flats they have painted won't be maintained by the owners and it will start to look shabby after a few years. The only way to regenerate the area is to encourage individual shops to come in to the area and I don't mean betting shops, takeaways, loan shops etc
For risk of upsetting a few people. Yes, the area looked very run down and Yes, it was in need of a much needed makeover, but businesses should be made to keep there own shop front and flats above maintained themselves. I don't believe this should have come out of tax payers pockets The businesses themselves should have contributed on that part. Sad thing is many of the businesses and flats they have painted won't be maintained by the owners and it will start to look shabby after a few years. The only way to regenerate the area is to encourage individual shops to come in to the area and I don't mean betting shops, takeaways, loan shops etc Debbie2312
  • Score: 19

2:55pm Fri 14 Mar 14

Helen, Walthamstow says...

The problem with this kind of makeover is that the buildings might look more cared for (regardless of what we think of the colour schemes) at least for a while, but without effective regeneration, it's a case of putting lipstick on a pig.

The narrowing of the junction and removal of the slip road is causing traffic to build up in Hoe Street and the High Road, undoubtedly lowering the air quality in the area even further. The crossings for pedestrians feel, if anything, more unsuitable than they used to, with long waits.

The shops below are by and large the same medley of scruffy outlets with little to attract new shoppers.

The large paved areas are wastelands - are there plans in the pipeline to make them more appealing?

And, as Debbie says, unless the landlords are somehow made to upkeep the buildings, it is a waste of public money.

This is just one of a host of schemes across the borough being completed just in time for the run up to the local elections. Look out for a bumper copy of WFN filled with the ruling party's boasts about how much it has achieved for the borough - conveniently ignoring how much damage it has done in the last four years.
The problem with this kind of makeover is that the buildings might look more cared for (regardless of what we think of the colour schemes) at least for a while, but without effective regeneration, it's a case of putting lipstick on a pig. The narrowing of the junction and removal of the slip road is causing traffic to build up in Hoe Street and the High Road, undoubtedly lowering the air quality in the area even further. The crossings for pedestrians feel, if anything, more unsuitable than they used to, with long waits. The shops below are by and large the same medley of scruffy outlets with little to attract new shoppers. The large paved areas are wastelands - are there plans in the pipeline to make them more appealing? And, as Debbie says, unless the landlords are somehow made to upkeep the buildings, it is a waste of public money. This is just one of a host of schemes across the borough being completed just in time for the run up to the local elections. Look out for a bumper copy of WFN filled with the ruling party's boasts about how much it has achieved for the borough - conveniently ignoring how much damage it has done in the last four years. Helen, Walthamstow
  • Score: 16

3:38pm Fri 14 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

When the pastel colour starts to peel and flake it will look worse than before. As for the filled in slip road, I noticed a large vegetable stall plotted up, probably without authority.
When the pastel colour starts to peel and flake it will look worse than before. As for the filled in slip road, I noticed a large vegetable stall plotted up, probably without authority. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -8

5:14pm Fri 14 Mar 14

westside_o says...

People will shop where the location, choice of goods and prices suit them best.
I really don't think a lick of paint will boost footfall or profits for any businesses concerned.
People will shop where the location, choice of goods and prices suit them best. I really don't think a lick of paint will boost footfall or profits for any businesses concerned. westside_o
  • Score: 4

8:20pm Fri 14 Mar 14

mdj says...

The new road layout is a genuine issue: as you approach the junction with Tesco on your left, two lanes are marked, but the road suddenly pulls out to narrow it at the lights, creating an avoidable scrum and tailback
Similarly, the pavement needlessly tapers outwards outside Woo Lot, who will lose a lot of casual business.
As said above, the late left turn out of Hoe St has just enough of a radius for a bus not to clip the opposite lane, but every bus driver will need to be wide awake to avoid doing so.
It will be interesting to compare the tailbacks at the junction approaches before and after these 'improvements.'

And, yet again, Chinese granite paving. What's wrong with York stone, if the budget runs to more than concrete?
The new road layout is a genuine issue: as you approach the junction with Tesco on your left, two lanes are marked, but the road suddenly pulls out to narrow it at the lights, creating an avoidable scrum and tailback Similarly, the pavement needlessly tapers outwards outside Woo Lot, who will lose a lot of casual business. As said above, the late left turn out of Hoe St has just enough of a radius for a bus not to clip the opposite lane, but every bus driver will need to be wide awake to avoid doing so. It will be interesting to compare the tailbacks at the junction approaches before and after these 'improvements.' And, yet again, Chinese granite paving. What's wrong with York stone, if the budget runs to more than concrete? mdj
  • Score: 5

10:15pm Fri 14 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

mdj wrote:
The new road layout is a genuine issue: as you approach the junction with Tesco on your left, two lanes are marked, but the road suddenly pulls out to narrow it at the lights, creating an avoidable scrum and tailback
Similarly, the pavement needlessly tapers outwards outside Woo Lot, who will lose a lot of casual business.
As said above, the late left turn out of Hoe St has just enough of a radius for a bus not to clip the opposite lane, but every bus driver will need to be wide awake to avoid doing so.
It will be interesting to compare the tailbacks at the junction approaches before and after these 'improvements.'

And, yet again, Chinese granite paving. What's wrong with York stone, if the budget runs to more than concrete?
It is illegally to casually park outside Woo Lots and nip in for a quick Chop Suey and Sum Dim Sum Ting.

Those says of being able to do so and get a ticking off by a yellow banded hat traffic warden are long gone, tickets get issued like confetti.
[quote][p][bold]mdj[/bold] wrote: The new road layout is a genuine issue: as you approach the junction with Tesco on your left, two lanes are marked, but the road suddenly pulls out to narrow it at the lights, creating an avoidable scrum and tailback Similarly, the pavement needlessly tapers outwards outside Woo Lot, who will lose a lot of casual business. As said above, the late left turn out of Hoe St has just enough of a radius for a bus not to clip the opposite lane, but every bus driver will need to be wide awake to avoid doing so. It will be interesting to compare the tailbacks at the junction approaches before and after these 'improvements.' And, yet again, Chinese granite paving. What's wrong with York stone, if the budget runs to more than concrete?[/p][/quote]It is illegally to casually park outside Woo Lots and nip in for a quick Chop Suey and Sum Dim Sum Ting. Those says of being able to do so and get a ticking off by a yellow banded hat traffic warden are long gone, tickets get issued like confetti. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -11

6:51am Sat 15 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

This is of course great news for the Loan Shops, Cash converting and cheques cashing premises, vast book makers, charity shops and depressing emporiums selling tat that dominate this once thriving area. One only has to look at the old Bakers Arms street scenes from 100 year ago at the Vestry House or in local Books to see the terrible change in modern times. Hardly progress, the shops killed off by parking and traffic problems, mismanagement and high business rates courtesy of the successive Labour incompetent councils. Permitting the flag ship Landmark Bakers Arms pub to become a bookies is how wrong things are. Only shop left with any quality is Davies. Fishmongers but I feel that it will not be long before that goes the same way.
This is of course great news for the Loan Shops, Cash converting and cheques cashing premises, vast book makers, charity shops and depressing emporiums selling tat that dominate this once thriving area. One only has to look at the old Bakers Arms street scenes from 100 year ago at the Vestry House or in local Books to see the terrible change in modern times. Hardly progress, the shops killed off by parking and traffic problems, mismanagement and high business rates courtesy of the successive Labour incompetent councils. Permitting the flag ship Landmark Bakers Arms pub to become a bookies is how wrong things are. Only shop left with any quality is Davies. Fishmongers but I feel that it will not be long before that goes the same way. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -4

11:32am Thu 20 Mar 14

ffuente says...

Contrarily to previous posts I think what has been done is a much welcome improvement. It should be repeated all along truly awful Lea Bridge Rd and to the rest of Leyton High Rd all the way to Bakers Arms. I agree that owners of shops and above flats should be held accountable for their tasteful upkeep at all times. The choice of shops available around Lea Bridge Road/Bakers Arms/ half of Leyton High Rd is frankly uninspiring and often revolting. Most of the food outlets for example in those aforementioned areas should be closed. I moved in Waltham Forest nearly 2 years ago and it is a long way still before these areas are up to scratch. Note that all homeowners,landlords and renters in the borough should be also held responsible for maintaining the front of their houses.
Contrarily to previous posts I think what has been done is a much welcome improvement. It should be repeated all along truly awful Lea Bridge Rd and to the rest of Leyton High Rd all the way to Bakers Arms. I agree that owners of shops and above flats should be held accountable for their tasteful upkeep at all times. The choice of shops available around Lea Bridge Road/Bakers Arms/ half of Leyton High Rd is frankly uninspiring and often revolting. Most of the food outlets for example in those aforementioned areas should be closed. I moved in Waltham Forest nearly 2 years ago and it is a long way still before these areas are up to scratch. Note that all homeowners,landlords and renters in the borough should be also held responsible for maintaining the front of their houses. ffuente
  • Score: 2

1:17pm Thu 20 Mar 14

RichieA70 says...

Regarding maintenance of the shop fronts, this is what Cllr Clyde Loakes told me a few months ago:

"The Council has legal agreements with all traders who are benefiting from investment that includes clauses around maintenance, keeping the shops clean, restricts removal of the new investment for a set number of years, and through planning policy we are also looking to ensure that future amendments to the shops come through the planning system to enable the Council to assist the traders in developing the best interventions for the unit so as not to detrimentally impact on the parade as a whole."
Regarding maintenance of the shop fronts, this is what Cllr Clyde Loakes told me a few months ago: "The Council has legal agreements with all traders who are benefiting from investment that includes clauses around maintenance, keeping the shops clean, restricts removal of the new investment for a set number of years, and through planning policy we are also looking to ensure that future amendments to the shops come through the planning system to enable the Council to assist the traders in developing the best interventions for the unit so as not to detrimentally impact on the parade as a whole." RichieA70
  • Score: 0

1:42pm Thu 20 Mar 14

mdj says...

'and through planning policy we are also looking to ensure that future amendments to the shops come through the planning system to enable the Council to assist the traders in developing the best interventions for the unit so as not to detrimentally impact on the parade as a whole."

So this wasn't part of the requirement? It could have been; why not?
Creation of a conservation area would do this at a stroke, if the intention is serious.
'and through planning policy we are also looking to ensure that future amendments to the shops come through the planning system to enable the Council to assist the traders in developing the best interventions for the unit so as not to detrimentally impact on the parade as a whole." So this wasn't part of the requirement? It could have been; why not? Creation of a conservation area would do this at a stroke, if the intention is serious. mdj
  • Score: 0

4:29pm Thu 20 Mar 14

RichieA70 says...

mdj wrote:
'and through planning policy we are also looking to ensure that future amendments to the shops come through the planning system to enable the Council to assist the traders in developing the best interventions for the unit so as not to detrimentally impact on the parade as a whole."

So this wasn't part of the requirement? It could have been; why not?
Creation of a conservation area would do this at a stroke, if the intention is serious.
I've suggested new conservation areas may help, and reduce the relentless butchering and unsympathetic alterations to buildings. Here's Cllr Loake's reply:

"On The whole designation of a conservation doesn't offer much more protection in commercial areas than the existing situation as shops and flats do not have permitted development rights, and as such all changes to shopfronts already require planning permission, whether within a Conservation Area or not. This includes the installation of any external security shutters, satellite dishes etc. Alterations to flats, maisonettes, flats above shops and houses converted to flats automatically require planning permission, whether within a Conservation Area or not this includes replacement windows, satellite dishes etc.

Some advertisements on commercial properties already require Advertisement Consent whether in a conservation area or not (applying for this is similar to applying for planning permission). Examples of adverts that do not require permission are most non-illuminated shop fascia signs and estate agents “for sale” or “to let” boards. Within a Conservation Area, virtually all illuminated signs will require advertisement consent.
Therefore the extension of conservation areas would not provide much more additional protection to shops and flats above shops than already exists within the planning system."
[quote][p][bold]mdj[/bold] wrote: 'and through planning policy we are also looking to ensure that future amendments to the shops come through the planning system to enable the Council to assist the traders in developing the best interventions for the unit so as not to detrimentally impact on the parade as a whole." So this wasn't part of the requirement? It could have been; why not? Creation of a conservation area would do this at a stroke, if the intention is serious.[/p][/quote]I've suggested new conservation areas may help, and reduce the relentless butchering and unsympathetic alterations to buildings. Here's Cllr Loake's reply: "On The whole designation of a conservation doesn't offer much more protection in commercial areas than the existing situation as shops and flats do not have permitted development rights, and as such all changes to shopfronts already require planning permission, whether within a Conservation Area or not. This includes the installation of any external security shutters, satellite dishes etc. Alterations to flats, maisonettes, flats above shops and houses converted to flats automatically require planning permission, whether within a Conservation Area or not this includes replacement windows, satellite dishes etc. Some advertisements on commercial properties already require Advertisement Consent whether in a conservation area or not (applying for this is similar to applying for planning permission). Examples of adverts that do not require permission are most non-illuminated shop fascia signs and estate agents “for sale” or “to let” boards. Within a Conservation Area, virtually all illuminated signs will require advertisement consent. Therefore the extension of conservation areas would not provide much more additional protection to shops and flats above shops than already exists within the planning system." RichieA70
  • Score: 0

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