Developer approved for Walthamstow regeneration scheme

The Marlowe Road estate.

The Marlowe Road estate.

First published in News
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A project hailed as the largest council housing scheme in Waltham Forest for decades took a major step forward last night.

A developer was approved for the regeneration of the Marlowe Road estate in Walthamstow, which the council described as not fit for purpose when it announced the project last summer.

Mulalley, the Woodford Green-based construction company, will lead the £70million development, which will see 150 of the 298 council homes on the estate demolished and rebuilt, as well as an overhaul of the remaining housing, public spaces and layout.

The council says work will be carried out in phases over a number of years, so residents will be moved within the estate while work is being carried out on their homes.

A total of 250 new private homes will also be built to subsidise the project.

Speaking at a meeting of the council’s cabinet, Councillor Marie Pye, cabinet member for housing, said: “This is one of the most important presentations I’ll make to cabinet.

“This is probably the biggest housing project this authority has planned for many decades.

“This means this is really going to happen.

“We’re going to do huge regeneration work, knock down huge amounts of housing and rebuild.

“We’re going to provide the best quality, best designed, best places to live and retain under council ownership, so I’m really pleased.”

Mulalley was chosen from 25 developers and housing associations after a six-month tendering process.

The council said the project will contribute to the regeneration of the Wood Street area and reduce anti-social behaviour.

The council’s housing budget will contribute £10.2m towards social housing and the rest of the cost will be made up from private sales.

All work is subject to planning approval and the completion of a development agreement, which will be put before cabinet in the summer.

Mulalley is currently building the Essex Wharf development in Lea Bridge Road, Leyton.

Countryside Properties Ltd was chosen as a reserve developer.

Work is likely to begin in summer 2015 for completion by autumn 2020.

Comments (7)

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11:50am Wed 19 Mar 14

spy_in_the sky says...

they should demolished the drive aswell
they should demolished the drive aswell spy_in_the sky
  • Score: 0

12:06pm Wed 19 Mar 14

myopinioncounts says...

Perhaps this time they could build homes that stand the test of time like the thousands of Victorian and Edwardian houses that Walthamstow still has.
Perhaps this time they could build homes that stand the test of time like the thousands of Victorian and Edwardian houses that Walthamstow still has. myopinioncounts
  • Score: 10

1:02pm Wed 19 Mar 14

chingford lad says...

What have I missed? The 'largest council housing scheme' It says 150 homes will be demolished and rebuilt paid for by building 250 private homes. So If I got this right, 250 families pay over the top for their homes to pay for no more council homes? Is this then the 'largest private housing scheme'
What have I missed? The 'largest council housing scheme' It says 150 homes will be demolished and rebuilt paid for by building 250 private homes. So If I got this right, 250 families pay over the top for their homes to pay for no more council homes? Is this then the 'largest private housing scheme' chingford lad
  • Score: 7

2:19pm Wed 19 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

More traffic.
More traffic. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -12

4:46pm Wed 19 Mar 14

mdj says...

The photos show that these blocks have already had one extensive (and rather charmless) renovation - I think in the late 80s - since they were built, probably in the 60s.
That's two phases of public borrowing invested and presumably still not repaid, which will now be written off, with the remaining half of the houses needing yet another refurbishment, and a huge increase in density for the site as a whole.
How many people will aspire to buy the new private properties for their own occupation? Is this merely creating a larger ghetto of housing that their occupants will take no pride in, or aspire to own? Effectively a privatised council estate, built to an ever-decreasing level of amenity?

When the two tower blocks nearby in Wood St were renovated over 20 years ago, the figures showed that the cost per flat was more than the market price of the neighbouring Edwardian three-bedroom houses.
I recall wondering why the council was not allowed simply to give each tenant a house, get them off the books, and redevelop the blocks for profit to recoup the cost.
Is keeping pools of people in dependency part of the policy?

Surely something is wrong with the way we do public housing in this country?
The photos show that these blocks have already had one extensive (and rather charmless) renovation - I think in the late 80s - since they were built, probably in the 60s. That's two phases of public borrowing invested and presumably still not repaid, which will now be written off, with the remaining half of the houses needing yet another refurbishment, and a huge increase in density for the site as a whole. How many people will aspire to buy the new private properties for their own occupation? Is this merely creating a larger ghetto of housing that their occupants will take no pride in, or aspire to own? Effectively a privatised council estate, built to an ever-decreasing level of amenity? When the two tower blocks nearby in Wood St were renovated over 20 years ago, the figures showed that the cost per flat was more than the market price of the neighbouring Edwardian three-bedroom houses. I recall wondering why the council was not allowed simply to give each tenant a house, get them off the books, and redevelop the blocks for profit to recoup the cost. Is keeping pools of people in dependency part of the policy? Surely something is wrong with the way we do public housing in this country? mdj
  • Score: 10

9:56am Thu 20 Mar 14

Villagecranberry says...

More traffic, I hope they encourage cycling by providing secure bike sheds with easy access.
More traffic, I hope they encourage cycling by providing secure bike sheds with easy access. Villagecranberry
  • Score: 0

11:21am Thu 20 Mar 14

John J C Moss says...

There have been very few new build family houses with gardens for people to buy in Waltham Forest in the past years. and whilst the Wood Street Area Action Plan calls for the provision of family homes in traditional streets, it will be interesting to see whether the developers deliver this, or just poky flats for investors to buy and let out at exorbitant rents.

As we are reliant on the policy decisions of Pye et al which gave us the vast over-development of the Walthamstow Stadium site, Tyco Works and the hideous South Grove, forgive me if I have little hope for Marlowe Road.

BTW did you know that the original Marlowe Road was so called because the builders were Martin and Lowe? Nothing to do with Shakespear's famous rival!
There have been very few new build family houses with gardens for people to buy in Waltham Forest in the past years. and whilst the Wood Street Area Action Plan calls for the provision of family homes in traditional streets, it will be interesting to see whether the developers deliver this, or just poky flats for investors to buy and let out at exorbitant rents. As we are reliant on the policy decisions of Pye et al which gave us the vast over-development of the Walthamstow Stadium site, Tyco Works and the hideous South Grove, forgive me if I have little hope for Marlowe Road. BTW did you know that the original Marlowe Road was so called because the builders were Martin and Lowe? Nothing to do with Shakespear's famous rival! John J C Moss
  • Score: 3

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