Epping Forest's problematic potholes persist

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Pothole problems persist Pothole problems persist

Epping Forest has seen the largest increase in potholes on minor roads in Essex, with an average of three reported every day since the turn of the year.

Data released by Essex County Council shows the number of reported surface defects has increased by 90 to 1,152 since January 1.

The number of potholes in residential roads has also more than doubled in the last 12 months, from 555 to 1152, figures show.

Reported in potholes in major roads in the district reduced by 30 to 236, but this is still the second highest number in Essex.

Money earmarked for maintenance such as individual pothole repairs has been cut by £2million to £90million this financial year.

Essex County Council cabinet member for Highways, Rodney Bass, said: “These numbers should be taken as an indication of general trends in roads conditions not as an absolute.

“We may be a victim of our own success as we have encouraged more people to report defects and local roads are more likely to be reported as they are outside people’s  homes.”

“We have made enormous progress on priority one and two roads and you will see us working in local roads more effectively addressing clusters of potholes rather than individual cases.”

Comments (2)

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10:44am Wed 9 Apr 14

SNGreen says...

No Rodney you are not the victim of 'your own success' but of your departments failures to look after the roads properly!

It is also worth noting there are less money for pot holes but more for resurfacing, Tour De France have anything to do with it maybe? Maybe we should more roads resurfaced next year. It would save money in the long term.
No Rodney you are not the victim of 'your own success' but of your departments failures to look after the roads properly! It is also worth noting there are less money for pot holes but more for resurfacing, Tour De France have anything to do with it maybe? Maybe we should more roads resurfaced next year. It would save money in the long term. SNGreen
  • Score: 2

6:29pm Wed 9 Apr 14

pm1234 says...

This shows just how detached from reality this man is if he thinks that they are victims of their own success. Pedestrians and motorists are the victims.

The roads have been patched up for far far to long with sub standard cheap fix repairs. Pot holes that I have reported have been eventually fixed and fallen apart again within a matter of weeks. In fact some in Borders lane in Loughton are in need of their third and fourth repair this year. People just leave traffic cones in the holes in an attempt to warn other motorists who have to swerve on to the other side of the road to avoid them.

Just dumping a bit of loose lay tarmac in a muddy puddle is not fixing a pot hole.

It is not just the road either, some pavements are in a terrible condition. I reported a kerb stone that had fallen out on a bend back in June last year right next to a pot hole. The pot hole got a little bit of tarmac dropped in it but the kerb stone ignored. Nearly a year on more kerb stones have fallen out next to it and the pavement is crumbling into the road. This is on a busy pavement by some local shops.

If repairing a pot hole is no more complicated than dropping a bag of tarmac in them as seems to be the case, then maybe the council should start leaving tarmac out next to the salt grit bins and we could all fill them?
This shows just how detached from reality this man is if he thinks that they are victims of their own success. Pedestrians and motorists are the victims. The roads have been patched up for far far to long with sub standard cheap fix repairs. Pot holes that I have reported have been eventually fixed and fallen apart again within a matter of weeks. In fact some in Borders lane in Loughton are in need of their third and fourth repair this year. People just leave traffic cones in the holes in an attempt to warn other motorists who have to swerve on to the other side of the road to avoid them. Just dumping a bit of loose lay tarmac in a muddy puddle is not fixing a pot hole. It is not just the road either, some pavements are in a terrible condition. I reported a kerb stone that had fallen out on a bend back in June last year right next to a pot hole. The pot hole got a little bit of tarmac dropped in it but the kerb stone ignored. Nearly a year on more kerb stones have fallen out next to it and the pavement is crumbling into the road. This is on a busy pavement by some local shops. If repairing a pot hole is no more complicated than dropping a bag of tarmac in them as seems to be the case, then maybe the council should start leaving tarmac out next to the salt grit bins and we could all fill them? pm1234
  • Score: 2

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