Five of the 30 new affordable homes arrived at Forest YMCA's headquarters on Friday

Shipping container homes arrive at charity's HQ

The container homes cost £70 a week to rent

Forest YMCA has helped keep youngsters off the streets for 40 years

First published in News
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

The first homes made from shipping containers have arrived at the headquarters of a charity supporting young homeless people.

Forest YMCA in Forest Road, Walthamstow, was granted £645,000 from the Greater London Authority earlier this year to make use of the containers as living spaces, known as the mYPad scheme.

Five of the 30 new homes were delivered to the charity's main site in Forest Road, described by the charity's chief executive as a "monumental step".

Timothy Pain said:  "It’s a very exciting day for us all and the start of something very special.

"We’ve worked hard to bring the mYPad project to life and are completely overwhelmed by the worldwide response that the concept has received so far.

"We’re all looking forward to seeing the positive impact living in a mYPad will have on our residents on their journeys to independence, and eagerly await their feedback once they are living in them.

"There’s still some more work to be done and this marks a monumental step in the project’s journey."

The mYPad scheme was developed in response to a lack of affordable housing for young people when they lose housing benefit after securing full-time employment.

The container homes cost £70 a week to rent and it is hoped the low costs will allow Forest YMCA residents to save for first-time mortgage deposits.

Ten of the container homes will be developed in Forest Road, while a further 20 will be set up on a brownfield site in Coopers Lane, Leyton, by June.

Comments (11)

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7:57am Tue 8 Apr 14

Villagecranberry says...

Legalised beds in sheds, third world accommodation arrives in Waltham Forest instead of job creation to build long term social housing of the quality of post War Britain.

False economy and no doubt it will only be a matter of time before the occupants complain of the squalid conditions.
Legalised beds in sheds, third world accommodation arrives in Waltham Forest instead of job creation to build long term social housing of the quality of post War Britain. False economy and no doubt it will only be a matter of time before the occupants complain of the squalid conditions. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -2

10:54am Tue 8 Apr 14

cynicalsue says...

A dreadful downward spiral of slum creation.
A dreadful downward spiral of slum creation. cynicalsue
  • Score: 5

1:35pm Tue 8 Apr 14

chingford lad says...

I can accommodate four of these at the end of my very long garden which has a rear access via a public road. Does the council help financially home owners who would like to assist these unfortunates at the same time as providing an income for the landlord?
I can accommodate four of these at the end of my very long garden which has a rear access via a public road. Does the council help financially home owners who would like to assist these unfortunates at the same time as providing an income for the landlord? chingford lad
  • Score: 1

2:08pm Tue 8 Apr 14

ruby newbie says...

£70 pound a week rent, assuming the average wage for a 18 year old is £150 a week that is assuming they are in full time work assuming that there is a council tax contribution money for food and travel to work ......not a lot left for saving for a mortgage then. I don't have an answer great idea but try not to insult us all with the hype.
£70 pound a week rent, assuming the average wage for a 18 year old is £150 a week that is assuming they are in full time work assuming that there is a council tax contribution money for food and travel to work ......not a lot left for saving for a mortgage then. I don't have an answer great idea but try not to insult us all with the hype. ruby newbie
  • Score: -3

2:14pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Villagecranberry says...

chingford lad wrote:
I can accommodate four of these at the end of my very long garden which has a rear access via a public road. Does the council help financially home owners who would like to assist these unfortunates at the same time as providing an income for the landlord?
No, there is one rule for them and another for anyone else in the borough who would like to earn £70 a week for housing a person in a potential death trap home, a metal tomb.

All this in a country where people are seeking asylum, fleeing from shanty towns around the world to be potential rehoused in ..........another shanty town!
[quote][p][bold]chingford lad[/bold] wrote: I can accommodate four of these at the end of my very long garden which has a rear access via a public road. Does the council help financially home owners who would like to assist these unfortunates at the same time as providing an income for the landlord?[/p][/quote]No, there is one rule for them and another for anyone else in the borough who would like to earn £70 a week for housing a person in a potential death trap home, a metal tomb. All this in a country where people are seeking asylum, fleeing from shanty towns around the world to be potential rehoused in ..........another shanty town! Villagecranberry
  • Score: -4

2:29pm Tue 8 Apr 14

sd1969 says...

I read this and though it's not April 1 - seriously WF?? Or should I say WTF?
I read this and though it's not April 1 - seriously WF?? Or should I say WTF? sd1969
  • Score: 0

7:47pm Tue 8 Apr 14

stickmanny says...

You guys are snobs there's nothing wrong with this at all
You guys are snobs there's nothing wrong with this at all stickmanny
  • Score: 2

8:26pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Villagecranberry says...

stickmanny wrote:
You guys are snobs there's nothing wrong with this at all
There is a lot wrong with it. Why not build low density 'Peabody style flats, or Warner flats?' They are housing people in container units. If the Tories had proposed this it would make National News and Stella Creasy would be saying that the Conservatives are creating Shanty Towns. These units are worse than post war prefabricated buildings that were erected for a lifespan of a few years but were still in use in the 1980s!

This is a cynical ploy and if they get away with it it, will be the accepted answer to the housing crisis. This is not acceptable. We are supposed to be civilised and I am very much surprised that yo think it is ok Stickmanny. Someone is making a lot of money out of this scheme at over 20k a unit.

There are builders out there that could produce superstructures of a substantial nature for much less.
[quote][p][bold]stickmanny[/bold] wrote: You guys are snobs there's nothing wrong with this at all[/p][/quote]There is a lot wrong with it. Why not build low density 'Peabody style flats, or Warner flats?' They are housing people in container units. If the Tories had proposed this it would make National News and Stella Creasy would be saying that the Conservatives are creating Shanty Towns. These units are worse than post war prefabricated buildings that were erected for a lifespan of a few years but were still in use in the 1980s! This is a cynical ploy and if they get away with it it, will be the accepted answer to the housing crisis. This is not acceptable. We are supposed to be civilised and I am very much surprised that yo think it is ok Stickmanny. Someone is making a lot of money out of this scheme at over 20k a unit. There are builders out there that could produce superstructures of a substantial nature for much less. Villagecranberry
  • Score: 1

11:42pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Sam Hain says...

I'd advise all sceptics to visit Trinity Buoy Wharf at Orchard Place where the Lea meets the Thames (East India DLR station and 10 min walk) to see what can be achieved with shipping containers - it's a revelation.
I'd advise all sceptics to visit Trinity Buoy Wharf at Orchard Place where the Lea meets the Thames (East India DLR station and 10 min walk) to see what can be achieved with shipping containers - it's a revelation. Sam Hain
  • Score: 3

7:28am Wed 9 Apr 14

stickmanny says...

Thank you Sam. There is nothing so over-engineered as a conventional house.
Thank you Sam. There is nothing so over-engineered as a conventional house. stickmanny
  • Score: 3

12:05pm Fri 11 Apr 14

mdj says...

' There is nothing so over-engineered as a conventional house.'

As a timber-frame fan, and Walter Segal's ideas in particular - I agree; but the cost of housing is mostly to do with land prices and planning policy (both closely linked), not building methods.

While it's good to see the YMCA doing what it can within its resources for those people it can help (though these seem over-priced for what they do), this is part of a larger picture of reducing expectations.
' There is nothing so over-engineered as a conventional house.' As a timber-frame fan, and Walter Segal's ideas in particular - I agree; but the cost of housing is mostly to do with land prices and planning policy (both closely linked), not building methods. While it's good to see the YMCA doing what it can within its resources for those people it can help (though these seem over-priced for what they do), this is part of a larger picture of reducing expectations. mdj
  • Score: 2

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