Belgian ambassador to open Great War refugee exhibition

Works of WWI poster propaganda artist to be showcased at William Morris Gallery from May 23

Works of WWI poster propaganda artist to be showcased at William Morris Gallery from May 23

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East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter, covering Chingford, Highams Park and Woodford. Call me on 07795 476 625

A diplomat is to open a new exhibition about the lives of Belgian refugees during the First World War. 

Guy Trouveroy, the Belgian ambassador to the UK, will visit Walthamstow's William Morris Gallery next month to launch the event, which showcases the lives of 250,000 Belgians who sought sanctuary in England.

The exhibition, entitled Help is Better than Sympathy, features a series of rare paintings and illustrations by artist Frank Brangywn, a profilic poster-maker synonymous with First World War propaganda.  

Mr Trouveroy, a former ambassador to Moscow, said: "It is a great pleasure to be invited to launch this important exhibition.

"The story of the Belgian refugees illustrates the depth of friendship between our two countries, while Brangwyn’s work exemplifies our strong artistic ties." 

He will open the event, which runs until Setember 14, on May 23. 

 

 

 

Comments (3)

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9:42pm Thu 10 Apr 14

Villagecranberry says...

Great news, as long it is not the Italian Ambassador, he would change his mind at the crucial moment.
Great news, as long it is not the Italian Ambassador, he would change his mind at the crucial moment. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -4

10:31am Fri 11 Apr 14

Thunderbird4 says...

The Belgians are noted for their fine chocolate, perhaps he'll bring the Ferrero Rocher.
The Belgians are noted for their fine chocolate, perhaps he'll bring the Ferrero Rocher. Thunderbird4
  • Score: -2

1:38pm Mon 14 Apr 14

mdj says...

It's good to see how the Gallery is being used as a podium to deal with issues that are not lost in the past, but still resonate today.

The Gallery, intelligently presented, puts us on the map of the world over a whole host of diverse topics, given Morris's huge range of interests, artistic, social and political. Brangwyn too, it now appears.

This was one of the points made by campaigners during the struggle a few years ago to save it from the Council's disastrous plans to run it down, and it's wonderfully heartening to see this come to fruition.

In this centenary year we're hearing a lot of relativist argument about how the Great War was simply a power-struggle between different elites. This tries to imply there was nothing to choose between them, and will doubtless be wheeled out again in 2039.
The German invasion of neutral Belgium was a barbaric war crime: civilians were massacred , and the entire population starved of food, as deliberate policy.
This exhibition is a good time to recall that, and also to highlight the somewhat overlooked work of Frank Brangwyn, and the larger debt we owe him for the Gallery's existence.
It's good to see how the Gallery is being used as a podium to deal with issues that are not lost in the past, but still resonate today. The Gallery, intelligently presented, puts us on the map of the world over a whole host of diverse topics, given Morris's huge range of interests, artistic, social and political. Brangwyn too, it now appears. This was one of the points made by campaigners during the struggle a few years ago to save it from the Council's disastrous plans to run it down, and it's wonderfully heartening to see this come to fruition. In this centenary year we're hearing a lot of relativist argument about how the Great War was simply a power-struggle between different elites. This tries to imply there was nothing to choose between them, and will doubtless be wheeled out again in 2039. The German invasion of neutral Belgium was a barbaric war crime: civilians were massacred , and the entire population starved of food, as deliberate policy. This exhibition is a good time to recall that, and also to highlight the somewhat overlooked work of Frank Brangwyn, and the larger debt we owe him for the Gallery's existence. mdj
  • Score: 0

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