Research by charity Shelter has revealed that people living in Waltham Forest are some of the most likely in England to be evicted from their home

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: At least one home in every road in Waltham Forest is at risk At least one home in every road in Waltham Forest is at risk

Residents of Waltham Forest among the most likely to lose their home in London, according to charity Shelter.

Today it was revealed that the borough is one of ten in England in which residents are deemed at serious risk of repossession or eviction.

According to the charity, one homeowner in every 46 in Waltham Forest falls into serious problems every week.

This makes it number nine of ten 'hotspots' for eviction.

Newham is the worst hit, with one home in every 34 being at risk.

Others in the top ten include Brent, Lewisham, Newham, Haringey and Enfield.

In neighbouring Epping Forest, only one in every 182 homes is a risk.

The research is based on data recorded by the Ministry of Justice over the last financial year, showing how many homeowners and private or social renters have received a possession notice for their home.

Comments (5)

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2:45pm Wed 21 May 14

Villagecranberry says...

Shelter is old hat.
Shelter is old hat. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -10

7:38pm Wed 21 May 14

stickmanny says...

Good one, but isn't this all about the influx of Daily Mail-reading darleks?
Good one, but isn't this all about the influx of Daily Mail-reading darleks? stickmanny
  • Score: -3

8:35pm Wed 21 May 14

Villagecranberry says...

stickmanny wrote:
Good one, but isn't this all about the influx of Daily Mail-reading darleks?
Stickmanny get a mind of your own for a change, it isn't working, give up.
[quote][p][bold]stickmanny[/bold] wrote: Good one, but isn't this all about the influx of Daily Mail-reading darleks?[/p][/quote]Stickmanny get a mind of your own for a change, it isn't working, give up. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -1

12:58pm Thu 22 May 14

garym says...

Housing costs due to rapidly rising rents have led to an upsurge in benefits claims from working people, there is not enough support for them and while I welcome a rent cap if it ever comes to be, in the here and now we have to deal with an influx of people who are priced out of the areas they made popular, a never ending cycle methinks. Shelter just reports the facts and due to their own internal employment issues are not as valuable as they once were. What we need in my opinion is a rapid use of compulsory purchase powers on empty homes, some of which have been derelict for years, hand them to social landlords with interest free grants and use them to reduce rents locally by reducing supply and demand problems. This would save billions long term, also stop right to buy, this has now been shown to be a failed policy.
Housing costs due to rapidly rising rents have led to an upsurge in benefits claims from working people, there is not enough support for them and while I welcome a rent cap if it ever comes to be, in the here and now we have to deal with an influx of people who are priced out of the areas they made popular, a never ending cycle methinks. Shelter just reports the facts and due to their own internal employment issues are not as valuable as they once were. What we need in my opinion is a rapid use of compulsory purchase powers on empty homes, some of which have been derelict for years, hand them to social landlords with interest free grants and use them to reduce rents locally by reducing supply and demand problems. This would save billions long term, also stop right to buy, this has now been shown to be a failed policy. garym
  • Score: 4

7:45pm Thu 22 May 14

fabster says...

garym wrote:
Housing costs due to rapidly rising rents have led to an upsurge in benefits claims from working people, there is not enough support for them and while I welcome a rent cap if it ever comes to be, in the here and now we have to deal with an influx of people who are priced out of the areas they made popular, a never ending cycle methinks. Shelter just reports the facts and due to their own internal employment issues are not as valuable as they once were. What we need in my opinion is a rapid use of compulsory purchase powers on empty homes, some of which have been derelict for years, hand them to social landlords with interest free grants and use them to reduce rents locally by reducing supply and demand problems. This would save billions long term, also stop right to buy, this has now been shown to be a failed policy.
"Hand them to social landlords" > some of whom are Councillors in their own wards. I don't think this is a good idea. Certainly not in Walthamstow, since there are a few Councillors who have become very wealthy through being landlords in their own wards, letting out properties to their constituents.
[quote][p][bold]garym[/bold] wrote: Housing costs due to rapidly rising rents have led to an upsurge in benefits claims from working people, there is not enough support for them and while I welcome a rent cap if it ever comes to be, in the here and now we have to deal with an influx of people who are priced out of the areas they made popular, a never ending cycle methinks. Shelter just reports the facts and due to their own internal employment issues are not as valuable as they once were. What we need in my opinion is a rapid use of compulsory purchase powers on empty homes, some of which have been derelict for years, hand them to social landlords with interest free grants and use them to reduce rents locally by reducing supply and demand problems. This would save billions long term, also stop right to buy, this has now been shown to be a failed policy.[/p][/quote]"Hand them to social landlords" > some of whom are Councillors in their own wards. I don't think this is a good idea. Certainly not in Walthamstow, since there are a few Councillors who have become very wealthy through being landlords in their own wards, letting out properties to their constituents. fabster
  • Score: 3

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