Tories target Walthamstow ward upset

Tories target Walthamstow ward upset

Cllr Matt Davis believes his party could get success in Wood Street

A map of all the wards in Waltham Forest

First published in News
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter, covering Chingford, Highams Park and Woodford. Call me on 07795 476 625

The leader of the Conservative group in Waltham Forest is backing his party to cause an upset in the labour stronghold of Walthamstow.

Cllr Matt Davis said the Tories have targeted Wood Street ward as a possible upset outside its heartland of Chingford, with Abdul Waheed Alavi, Ismet Balkan and Riitta Helena Soininen hoping to unseat Labour’s Peter Barnett, Angie Bean and Richard Sweden.

The Conservatives last held power in the borough in 1968, but Cllr Davis does not expect a significant power shift this time round.

He said:  "We think we're going to win seats in all of Chingford and we're looking to upset Labour in Wood Street as we've mounted a strong campaign there and listened closely to the people.

"Honestly, outside of Chingford and Wood Street, we will not be winning anything as we only expect to win where we work hardest."

However Cllr Davis said that the Liberal Democrats had targeted council leader Chris Robbins’ ward of Grove Green.

He added that the most common issue raised on the doorstep was the state of the borough’s roads and unsafe pavements.

Cllr Davis said: "Our number one priority is to fully repair every road and pavement in the borough in the next two years by utilising money from transport for London properly and using money from the council's reserves which will be paid back with interest.”

He also welcomed the emergence of the Trade Union and Socialist Coalition, which is fielding candidates in every ward.  

Cllr Davis added: "I would be delighted to see the TUSC take votes from Labour as I believe in diversity and giving voters a range of political options."

He also said this election was the first time he considered UKIP to be more than a fringe party at a local level, but did not expect major inroads into the Tory vote.

Comments (9)

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7:00pm Thu 22 May 14

mdj says...

If the Tories - or any other party - are serious about winning outside their heartlands, why on earth do they stand three candidates?
One might act as focus for enough protest votes to get elected.
Three will invariably dilute this effect.
The impression is created that standing is a gesture, rather than an intent to win, and furthers suspicion in the weary electorate that the main parties agree to keep off one anothers' turf.
If the Tories - or any other party - are serious about winning outside their heartlands, why on earth do they stand three candidates? One might act as focus for enough protest votes to get elected. Three will invariably dilute this effect. The impression is created that standing is a gesture, rather than an intent to win, and furthers suspicion in the weary electorate that the main parties agree to keep off one anothers' turf. mdj
  • Score: 8

10:23am Fri 23 May 14

Villagecranberry says...

Matt should consider modelling.
Matt should consider modelling. Villagecranberry
  • Score: 0

11:45am Fri 23 May 14

Alan_1976 says...

mdj wrote:
If the Tories - or any other party - are serious about winning outside their heartlands, why on earth do they stand three candidates?
One might act as focus for enough protest votes to get elected.
Three will invariably dilute this effect.
The impression is created that standing is a gesture, rather than an intent to win, and furthers suspicion in the weary electorate that the main parties agree to keep off one anothers' turf.
Given it's a Proportional Representation election and each voter has three votes that would seem a sensible number of candidates to put up if you're serious
[quote][p][bold]mdj[/bold] wrote: If the Tories - or any other party - are serious about winning outside their heartlands, why on earth do they stand three candidates? One might act as focus for enough protest votes to get elected. Three will invariably dilute this effect. The impression is created that standing is a gesture, rather than an intent to win, and furthers suspicion in the weary electorate that the main parties agree to keep off one anothers' turf.[/p][/quote]Given it's a Proportional Representation election and each voter has three votes that would seem a sensible number of candidates to put up if you're serious Alan_1976
  • Score: 0

10:37am Sat 24 May 14

topnote says...

I live in the Wood Street Ward, the article states that the conservatives worked hard to gather votes yet nobody knocked on my door or my neighbours so what does working hard mean?. Ok a couple of leaflets from various groups were pushed through the letterbox which were then promptly deposited in the recycling unread. Perhaps if candidates or their reps interacted with the voters and explained why the vote should vote for them then perhaps more people might change allegiances. Yes I did vote but in the same way as I have for a number of years because nobody attempted to change my mind.
I live in the Wood Street Ward, the article states that the conservatives worked hard to gather votes yet nobody knocked on my door or my neighbours so what does working hard mean?. Ok a couple of leaflets from various groups were pushed through the letterbox which were then promptly deposited in the recycling unread. Perhaps if candidates or their reps interacted with the voters and explained why the vote should vote for them then perhaps more people might change allegiances. Yes I did vote but in the same way as I have for a number of years because nobody attempted to change my mind. topnote
  • Score: 4

11:46am Sat 24 May 14

sahw says...

The best laid plans, and all that.

Having not only failed to make a dent in this "target seat", the Tories lost two in their Chingford "heartland" to Labour.

Shows what can happen when you take your eye off the ball. Or, rather, completely ignore the needs and aspirations of your constituents.

Oh, and they have lost all their Lib Dem chums, too! Won't they feel rather lonely in the Council chamber now? Perhaps they can hold their group meetings in a broom cupboard at the town hall.
The best laid plans, and all that. Having not only failed to make a dent in this "target seat", the Tories lost two in their Chingford "heartland" to Labour. Shows what can happen when you take your eye off the ball. Or, rather, completely ignore the needs and aspirations of your constituents. Oh, and they have lost all their Lib Dem chums, too! Won't they feel rather lonely in the Council chamber now? Perhaps they can hold their group meetings in a broom cupboard at the town hall. sahw
  • Score: 4

3:13pm Sat 24 May 14

Sam Hain says...

Didn't they try this once before, with similar results, ie they failed to gain Wood Street and lost Highams Park? I think that may also have been on Matt Davis' watch so perhaps his little group of 16 might now be looking for a leader who is actually willing and able to lead!
Didn't they try this once before, with similar results, ie they failed to gain Wood Street and lost Highams Park? I think that may also have been on Matt Davis' watch so perhaps his little group of 16 might now be looking for a leader who is actually willing and able to lead! Sam Hain
  • Score: 4

3:42pm Sat 24 May 14

sahw says...

Sam Hain wrote:
Didn't they try this once before, with similar results, ie they failed to gain Wood Street and lost Highams Park? I think that may also have been on Matt Davis' watch so perhaps his little group of 16 might now be looking for a leader who is actually willing and able to lead!
That assumes they have someone in their midst to take on that task.

I haven't seen one yet!
[quote][p][bold]Sam Hain[/bold] wrote: Didn't they try this once before, with similar results, ie they failed to gain Wood Street and lost Highams Park? I think that may also have been on Matt Davis' watch so perhaps his little group of 16 might now be looking for a leader who is actually willing and able to lead![/p][/quote]That assumes they have someone in their midst to take on that task. I haven't seen one yet! sahw
  • Score: 3

8:52pm Sat 24 May 14

Villagecranberry says...

Sam Hain wrote:
Didn't they try this once before, with similar results, ie they failed to gain Wood Street and lost Highams Park? I think that may also have been on Matt Davis' watch so perhaps his little group of 16 might now be looking for a leader who is actually willing and able to lead!
Failed to take Wood Street was the achievement?
[quote][p][bold]Sam Hain[/bold] wrote: Didn't they try this once before, with similar results, ie they failed to gain Wood Street and lost Highams Park? I think that may also have been on Matt Davis' watch so perhaps his little group of 16 might now be looking for a leader who is actually willing and able to lead![/p][/quote]Failed to take Wood Street was the achievement? Villagecranberry
  • Score: -3

11:05am Sun 25 May 14

roar says...

The demographic of Chingford is changing, it isn't the place of the rich that it once may have been . Social housing etc bring changes to the area which will change the style of voters.
The demographic of Chingford is changing, it isn't the place of the rich that it once may have been . Social housing etc bring changes to the area which will change the style of voters. roar
  • Score: -1

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