21-acre nursery expansion “devastating” for Nazeing Green Belt

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: 21 acres of glasshouses will be constructed in the development 21 acres of glasshouses will be constructed in the development

Expansion plans for a company growing salad crops will have a “devastating impact on the Green Belt”, according to Lee Valley Park Authority.

Plans to expand Valley Grown Nurseries in Paynes Lane, Nazeing, will see the construction of a renewable energy plant and 21 acres of glasshouses for growing tomatoes and peppers.

The development will be within the Lee Valley Park and cover nine hectares of Green Belt with glasshouses which will stand at around nine meters high.

A spokeswoman for the authority said: “The building will have a devastating impact on the open landscape of the park and Green Belt, which government and local council policies try to protect.

“There will be considerable disruption during construction and there is only limited control over the number of heavy goods vehicles using country lanes to get access.

“Whilst we acknowledge that the industry needs large scale glasshouses the Authority believes that they should be located away from areas of high landscape value such as these.”

The project is expected to bring 40 jobs to the area and see its first harvest in 2016.

Comments (4)

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8:51am Fri 23 May 14

karola says...

We need to grow more food closer to where it is needed. As our weather is so unpredictable it has to be under cover for the more delicate crops. I would like to see more hydroponic food production, in or near the cities, to cut out the food miles, which is adding to pollution.
I really think it is not the same as putting up more blocks of flats, that would be detrimental to the greenbelt.
We need to grow more food closer to where it is needed. As our weather is so unpredictable it has to be under cover for the more delicate crops. I would like to see more hydroponic food production, in or near the cities, to cut out the food miles, which is adding to pollution. I really think it is not the same as putting up more blocks of flats, that would be detrimental to the greenbelt. karola
  • Score: 7

9:04am Fri 23 May 14

villager1 says...

I agree with Karola. I am a keen supporter of the green belt and would normally object to any building on it however I believe this is a good decision. There has been greenhouse vegetable farming and market gardening in this area for generations and they needed to upgrade the facilities. This is good in terms of food miles, hydroponics and intensive greenhouse food production is the future and it can be very environmentally friendly. Much better this than estates of Barrat homes.
Good on the council for agreeing this.
I agree with Karola. I am a keen supporter of the green belt and would normally object to any building on it however I believe this is a good decision. There has been greenhouse vegetable farming and market gardening in this area for generations and they needed to upgrade the facilities. This is good in terms of food miles, hydroponics and intensive greenhouse food production is the future and it can be very environmentally friendly. Much better this than estates of Barrat homes. Good on the council for agreeing this. villager1
  • Score: 6

1:13pm Fri 23 May 14

Lea Valley Growers Association says...

Believe it or not, Growing Food in the countryside is not a new concept and Glasshouses are appropriate development in Green Belt and accepted as a distinctive landscape character of the Lea Valley.

Indeed the first commercial Glasshouses were built in the Lea Valley in the 1860's over 100 years before the formation of the Lee Valley Park.

The Lea Valley had the largest concentration of Glasshouses in the world in the 1950's employing over 6,000 local people. www.LVGA.co.uk

Food Production in the countryside is a priority if the country is to increase it's self sufficiency and reduce it's reliance on foreign imports.

The Lea Valley Growers, DWP & the Lea Valley Task Force are about to embark on a recruitment drive to find 100's of local people to work in the growing industry over the next few months.
Believe it or not, Growing Food in the countryside is not a new concept and Glasshouses are appropriate development in Green Belt and accepted as a distinctive landscape character of the Lea Valley. Indeed the first commercial Glasshouses were built in the Lea Valley in the 1860's over 100 years before the formation of the Lee Valley Park. The Lea Valley had the largest concentration of Glasshouses in the world in the 1950's employing over 6,000 local people. www.LVGA.co.uk Food Production in the countryside is a priority if the country is to increase it's self sufficiency and reduce it's reliance on foreign imports. The Lea Valley Growers, DWP & the Lea Valley Task Force are about to embark on a recruitment drive to find 100's of local people to work in the growing industry over the next few months. Lea Valley Growers Association
  • Score: 4

11:28pm Fri 23 May 14

Villagecranberry says...

Getting organic veg to your door is brilliant and not too dear.
Getting organic veg to your door is brilliant and not too dear. Villagecranberry
  • Score: 1

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