First winner of WW1 Victoria Cross to be honoured

Private Sidney Godley received the first VC of the Great War.

Private Sidney Godley received the first VC of the Great War.

First published in News
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter, covering the Epping Forest district. Call me on 07795 507 440

A ceremony will be held to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the awarding of the first Victoria Cross in the First World War.

Private Sidney Godley was given the honour by George V on August 23, 1914, after showing particular heroism in his management of machine guns on the first day of the Battle of Mons.

Mr Godley retired to Torrington Drive in Loughton and spent his last days in St. Margaret’s Hospital in Epping, where he died in 1957, aged 67. 

Loughton Town Council is set to hold a ceremony to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Mr Godley being awarded the Victoria Cross on August 23.

The short service will be held at Loughton Cemetery in Church Road, Loughton, at 4pm and will be open to the public.

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9:25pm Mon 11 Aug 14

Johnny Boy says...

Fantastic that Sid Godley is being honoured.
Godley defended the bridge for two hours, until he ran out of ammunition.His final act was to dismantle the gun and throw the pieces into the canal. He attempted to crawl to safety, but advancing German soldiers caught him and took him to a prisoner of war camp. His wounds were treated, but he remained in camp until the Armistice. Originally it was thought that he had been killed, but some time later it was found that he was a prisoner of war in a camp called Delotz at Dallgow-Döberitz. It was in the camp that he was informed that he had been awarded the Victoria Cross. Godley left the camp in 1918 after the guards fled their posts. He received the actual medal from King George V, at Buckingham Palace, on 15 February 1919.
Fantastic that Sid Godley is being honoured. Godley defended the bridge for two hours, until he ran out of ammunition.His final act was to dismantle the gun and throw the pieces into the canal. He attempted to crawl to safety, but advancing German soldiers caught him and took him to a prisoner of war camp. His wounds were treated, but he remained in camp until the Armistice. Originally it was thought that he had been killed, but some time later it was found that he was a prisoner of war in a camp called Delotz at Dallgow-Döberitz. It was in the camp that he was informed that he had been awarded the Victoria Cross. Godley left the camp in 1918 after the guards fled their posts. He received the actual medal from King George V, at Buckingham Palace, on 15 February 1919. Johnny Boy
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