Waltham Abbey dog owner has one more chance to appeal

Julie Cooper appeared at Chelmsford Magistrates' Court on Thursday

Julie Cooper appeared at Chelmsford Magistrates' Court on Thursday

First published in News
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter - Epping Forest

A dangerous dog is to be put down after leaving a police officer with puncture wounds and bruising to his leg.

Dodger, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier/Shar Pei cross, attacked the officer as he was visiting its owner, Julie Cooper at her home in Holecroft, Waltham Abbey, on 12 June at about 8.30am, as part of a criminal investigation.

At Chelmsford Magistrates' Court on Thursday, Miss Holland was ordered to pay £800 to the officer after pleading guilty to being the owner of a dog which was dangerously out of control and caused injury.

Dodger will be put down unless Mrs Cooper is successful in appealing against the sentence, which must be launched within 21 days.

Prosecutor Denise Holland told magistrates the officer went into the garden, called out saying ‘hello’ then the dog “ran out and lunged at him on each thigh in quick succession.”

Miss Holland said the officer drew his baton but Cooper came out and took control.

The officer was left with a bruise to the top of his right thigh and three puncture wounds to the top of his left leg, for which he received a tetanus jab and anti-biotics.

Because of his injuries the officer missed a camping trip with his family the following weekend.

Mitigating in person, Cooper explained she had never had an incident like this with the dog in the garden where she has a swing and children play.

She continued:  “I work in a care home and I’ve taken him in and he’s been passed around from lap to lap.”

Despite being shown a 100-signature “save the dog” petition, chair of the bench, Malcolm Bell said: “Zoologists think no animal is safe once it’s bitten someone.”

Comments (2)

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11:56am Sat 23 Aug 14

escapefrome17 says...

So what would the likely outcome have been had a child climbed in, as kids do, to retrieve a ball or whatever? I suppose this idiot would say it would run up an lick them, and what sort of care home would allow a dog like this to be passed from lap to lap?
So what would the likely outcome have been had a child climbed in, as kids do, to retrieve a ball or whatever? I suppose this idiot would say it would run up an lick them, and what sort of care home would allow a dog like this to be passed from lap to lap? escapefrome17
  • Score: 0

4:45pm Sat 23 Aug 14

Havering says...

"So what would the likely outcome have been had a child climbed in, as kids do, to retrieve a ball or whatever?"

It's called trespassing. If I had kids and live next door to a dog, any dog no matter how friendly it is, then the kids have to be educated that they do not just climb in to retrieve a ball. Firstly it is rude to do so and secondly I could never blame the dog for protecting it's property.

It's about time kids were educated and lot let do as they want when they want.
"So what would the likely outcome have been had a child climbed in, as kids do, to retrieve a ball or whatever?" It's called trespassing. If I had kids and live next door to a dog, any dog no matter how friendly it is, then the kids have to be educated that they do not just climb in to retrieve a ball. Firstly it is rude to do so and secondly I could never blame the dog for protecting it's property. It's about time kids were educated and lot let do as they want when they want. Havering
  • Score: 16
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