WALTHAM FOREST: Schemes aim to improve cycling

First published in News

SCHEMES to improve cycling in Waltham Forest have been announced.

A total of £250,000 from the Olympic Delivery Authority will be spent creating new cycle lanes and improving existing ones in an attempt to get more people out of their cars and on to their bikes.

Cycle links through Epping Forest will be reviewed, with a view to improving links to the borough.

Under the plans, new cycle lanes will be created in Whipps Cross Road and at the Bushwood Road/Bush Road junction in Leytonstone, as well as on the junction between Edward Road and Coppermill Lane in Walthamstow.

Cycle lanes will be remarked and repairs will be carried out in Leytonstone High Road between the Green Man roundabout and Thatched House junction.

Works to improve the environment in Cann Hall, Crownfield Road and Ruckholt Road are due to start later this year.

A total of 33 new bike stands will also be created across the borough.

Cllr Clyde Loakes, cabinet member for environment and bike enthusiast, said: "We want to get as many people as possible out of their cars and onto their bikes as we possibly can.”

"They are a great way of getting around quickly and easily and they are great for the environment as well.

"We aim to raise people's confidence on bicycles and provide the infrastructure they need to get around quickly and safely.”

Comments (21)

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3:13pm Fri 25 Jun 10

Tom Thumb says...

This does little or nothing for cycling. The Bushwood Road/Bush Road scheme involves painting a white line on the pavement and letting cyclists ride past a bus stop.

Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists.

Cyclists do not need any more joke cycle lanes which fall well below the recommended guidelines, they need separate cycle paths like in Holland.

The cycle lane on Leytonstone High Road is a dangerous farce and is regularly mocked by the Crap Cycling in Waltham Forest blogger, who rightly argues that what is needed on this street is a segregated cycle path: http://crapwalthamfo
rest.blogspot.com/20
09/12/going-dutch-on
-high-road-leytonsto
ne.html

“Works to improve the environment in Cann Hall, Crownfield Road and Ruckholt Road” mean just re-arranging the car parking.

“A total of 33 new bike stands will also be created across the borough.” This really is a sick joke. On these hot days the cycle stands are overflowing with bikes and to provide an extra 33 stands in a borough with 1,300 streets is pitiful.

Whenever there is a choice between car parking and providing good cycling infrastructure, Councillor Loakes and his cronies choose car parking. The council’s commitment to cycling is tokenism, nothing more.

The cycle crossing lights between St Mary Road and Selborne Road in Walthamstow have been out of action for months. That’s how seriously the council treats cyclists.
This does little or nothing for cycling. The Bushwood Road/Bush Road scheme involves painting a white line on the pavement and letting cyclists ride past a bus stop. Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists. Cyclists do not need any more joke cycle lanes which fall well below the recommended guidelines, they need separate cycle paths like in Holland. The cycle lane on Leytonstone High Road is a dangerous farce and is regularly mocked by the Crap Cycling in Waltham Forest blogger, who rightly argues that what is needed on this street is a segregated cycle path: http://crapwalthamfo rest.blogspot.com/20 09/12/going-dutch-on -high-road-leytonsto ne.html “Works to improve the environment in Cann Hall, Crownfield Road and Ruckholt Road” mean just re-arranging the car parking. “A total of 33 new bike stands will also be created across the borough.” This really is a sick joke. On these hot days the cycle stands are overflowing with bikes and to provide an extra 33 stands in a borough with 1,300 streets is pitiful. Whenever there is a choice between car parking and providing good cycling infrastructure, Councillor Loakes and his cronies choose car parking. The council’s commitment to cycling is tokenism, nothing more. The cycle crossing lights between St Mary Road and Selborne Road in Walthamstow have been out of action for months. That’s how seriously the council treats cyclists. Tom Thumb
  • Score: 0

4:36pm Fri 25 Jun 10

mr rusty says...

I don't suppose there's any chance of creating a proper cycle network in WF, there's just nowhere to put it! As Mr Thumb says above painting white lines down the sides of the road may tick boxes but does not make for a cycle network!!
In harlow, as in the other 'new' towns, Stevenage, MK, etc, we have properly segregated routes, either along the main roads seperated by grass or we have the old lanes from before when the town was built, now used as cycle only routes. We still have the problem of the chavvy dog people who think cycle tracks are for the exercising of their dogs but at least we don't have to mix it with the cars....and when we do drive our cars ( I like my car as much as my bike) the limit is mainly 40 throughout the town, not the silly 20 that seems to have taken over more and more of WF.......so glad I move 13 years ago, I only have to work in WF now!!
I don't suppose there's any chance of creating a proper cycle network in WF, there's just nowhere to put it! As Mr Thumb says above painting white lines down the sides of the road may tick boxes but does not make for a cycle network!! In harlow, as in the other 'new' towns, Stevenage, MK, etc, we have properly segregated routes, either along the main roads seperated by grass or we have the old lanes from before when the town was built, now used as cycle only routes. We still have the problem of the chavvy dog people who think cycle tracks are for the exercising of their dogs but at least we don't have to mix it with the cars....and when we do drive our cars ( I like my car as much as my bike) the limit is mainly 40 throughout the town, not the silly 20 that seems to have taken over more and more of WF.......so glad I move 13 years ago, I only have to work in WF now!! mr rusty
  • Score: 0

6:08pm Fri 25 Jun 10

Tom Thumb says...

Encouraging cyclists to ride on the pavement, like the council does on Snaresbrook Road, doesn't help anyone.
The cycle path outside the town hall and Waltham Forest college is rubbish because pedestrians walk in it.
The cycle lanes are no better because they are either too narrow or repeatedly obstructed.
Cyclists should be kept separate from both motor traffic and pedestrians. The Dutch do this and have the highest rate of cycling in the world.
The space is there. Roads in Holland are often no different in size to Britain.
And in Copenhagen they seem to manage to have streets which aren't full of signs, rubbish bags and the thousand and one things you find cluttering up the streets of London.
Holland manages to get people cycling while also being car owners. This is not happening in London, where most drivers have never cycled. Locally less than one journeys in a hundred is made by bike, even though most people are only going less than five miles.
Encouraging cyclists to ride on the pavement, like the council does on Snaresbrook Road, doesn't help anyone. The cycle path outside the town hall and Waltham Forest college is rubbish because pedestrians walk in it. The cycle lanes are no better because they are either too narrow or repeatedly obstructed. Cyclists should be kept separate from both motor traffic and pedestrians. The Dutch do this and have the highest rate of cycling in the world. The space is there. Roads in Holland are often no different in size to Britain. And in Copenhagen they seem to manage to have streets which aren't full of signs, rubbish bags and the thousand and one things you find cluttering up the streets of London. Holland manages to get people cycling while also being car owners. This is not happening in London, where most drivers have never cycled. Locally less than one journeys in a hundred is made by bike, even though most people are only going less than five miles. Tom Thumb
  • Score: 0

10:21pm Fri 25 Jun 10

md-j says...

'Under the plans, new cycle lanes will be created in Whipps Cross Road ..'

PLEASE don't run it in existing road space,with all the expanse of the Forest a few yards away. (It's still possible to detect the trace of the tramline that used to run beside the road, but it's now been blocked by snack huts, because its legal ownership was obscure). This is an easy chance to separate cars and bikes for a useful distance. To see the dangers of the opposite, look at the lethal road markings in Wood St and Markhouse Rd: no cyclist had anything to do with these layouts - or any sane motorist, for that matter.
'Under the plans, new cycle lanes will be created in Whipps Cross Road ..' PLEASE don't run it in existing road space,with all the expanse of the Forest a few yards away. (It's still possible to detect the trace of the tramline that used to run beside the road, but it's now been blocked by snack huts, because its legal ownership was obscure). This is an easy chance to separate cars and bikes for a useful distance. To see the dangers of the opposite, look at the lethal road markings in Wood St and Markhouse Rd: no cyclist had anything to do with these layouts - or any sane motorist, for that matter. md-j
  • Score: 0

10:33pm Fri 25 Jun 10

tonyinchingford says...

Before spending yet more money on cycle lanes, how much money is going to be spent on maintaining the existing lanes. I have given up riding my bike in Waltham Forest because of poorly maintained cycle lanes. Riding into over hanging vegetation and cut off branches in poorly lit conditions is both painful and dangerous. Riding on routes that are blocked by parked cars, cycle lanes that end leaving you arguing for road space with a bus or a lorry is hardly conducive to being safe on a bike. The money spent by Waltham Forest on Cycle networks to date is a joke. It is typical of Clyde Loakes to blow his trumpet on how great his administration has been in spending money on projects, but he never ever considers the costs of maintaining, or implementing maintenance plans of what has been put in place.
Before spending yet more money on cycle lanes, how much money is going to be spent on maintaining the existing lanes. I have given up riding my bike in Waltham Forest because of poorly maintained cycle lanes. Riding into over hanging vegetation and cut off branches in poorly lit conditions is both painful and dangerous. Riding on routes that are blocked by parked cars, cycle lanes that end leaving you arguing for road space with a bus or a lorry is hardly conducive to being safe on a bike. The money spent by Waltham Forest on Cycle networks to date is a joke. It is typical of Clyde Loakes to blow his trumpet on how great his administration has been in spending money on projects, but he never ever considers the costs of maintaining, or implementing maintenance plans of what has been put in place. tonyinchingford
  • Score: 0

9:58am Sat 26 Jun 10

Tom Thumb says...

md-j wrote:
'Under the plans, new cycle lanes will be created in Whipps Cross Road ..' PLEASE don't run it in existing road space,with all the expanse of the Forest a few yards away. (It's still possible to detect the trace of the tramline that used to run beside the road, but it's now been blocked by snack huts, because its legal ownership was obscure). This is an easy chance to separate cars and bikes for a useful distance. To see the dangers of the opposite, look at the lethal road markings in Wood St and Markhouse Rd: no cyclist had anything to do with these layouts - or any sane motorist, for that matter.
Spot on. Nobody will want to cycle along Whipps Cross Road if all that is on offer is a narrow lane painted in the road. The space exists for wide cycle paths here, completely segregated from cars.

I do not understand why there are no cycle paths offering routes across the Hollow Pond area linking Whipps Cross Road and Snaresbrook Road, or for that matter the Green Man and Woodford New Road. Where is the vision of serious cycle paths rather than the existing tokenism?

Markhouse Road is a big concern for those of us who commute. The cycle lanes might as well not exist they are so narrow. The traffic islands repeatedly force drivers into the cycle lane. Once you get past Boundary Road you end up stuck behind two lanes of traffic queuing for Lea Bridge Road. There are now a lot of routes where it is safer for me to use my car and just as quick rather than cycle.

Wood Street is unfit for cycling and the cycle lanes are a very bad joke.
[quote][p][bold]md-j[/bold] wrote: 'Under the plans, new cycle lanes will be created in Whipps Cross Road ..' PLEASE don't run it in existing road space,with all the expanse of the Forest a few yards away. (It's still possible to detect the trace of the tramline that used to run beside the road, but it's now been blocked by snack huts, because its legal ownership was obscure). This is an easy chance to separate cars and bikes for a useful distance. To see the dangers of the opposite, look at the lethal road markings in Wood St and Markhouse Rd: no cyclist had anything to do with these layouts - or any sane motorist, for that matter.[/p][/quote]Spot on. Nobody will want to cycle along Whipps Cross Road if all that is on offer is a narrow lane painted in the road. The space exists for wide cycle paths here, completely segregated from cars. I do not understand why there are no cycle paths offering routes across the Hollow Pond area linking Whipps Cross Road and Snaresbrook Road, or for that matter the Green Man and Woodford New Road. Where is the vision of serious cycle paths rather than the existing tokenism? Markhouse Road is a big concern for those of us who commute. The cycle lanes might as well not exist they are so narrow. The traffic islands repeatedly force drivers into the cycle lane. Once you get past Boundary Road you end up stuck behind two lanes of traffic queuing for Lea Bridge Road. There are now a lot of routes where it is safer for me to use my car and just as quick rather than cycle. Wood Street is unfit for cycling and the cycle lanes are a very bad joke. Tom Thumb
  • Score: 0

12:51pm Sat 26 Jun 10

jef costello says...

Pointless and insulting tokenism. This is the council that installed the junction of Ruckholt Road and Orient Way, which is utterly lethal. You can either stick to the road and risk getting flattened by drivers coming up behind you from the narrow bridge, or go on the *ahem* 'cycle path' and wait for 6 minutes for both sets of lights to change to get you over the traffic island and the top of Orient Way. You've no choice but to wait because the junction's on a blind bend. Anyone coming this way from, say, zone 1 will have only been cycling for about 20 minutes. 6 minutes added to your journey because of bad and dangerous planning. And then you have to negotiate Leyton, the spiritual home of the speeding, untaxed, uninsured, unlicenced driver - with a mobile phone clamped to their ear and almost zero chance of getting caught. And don't even get me started on the M11 footbridges, opaque with graffiti. Waltham Forest cycling is a SICK JOKE.
Pointless and insulting tokenism. This is the council that installed the junction of Ruckholt Road and Orient Way, which is utterly lethal. You can either stick to the road and risk getting flattened by drivers coming up behind you from the narrow bridge, or go on the *ahem* 'cycle path' and wait for 6 minutes for both sets of lights to change to get you over the traffic island and the top of Orient Way. You've no choice but to wait because the junction's on a blind bend. Anyone coming this way from, say, zone 1 will have only been cycling for about 20 minutes. 6 minutes added to your journey because of bad and dangerous planning. And then you have to negotiate Leyton, the spiritual home of the speeding, untaxed, uninsured, unlicenced driver - with a mobile phone clamped to their ear and almost zero chance of getting caught. And don't even get me started on the M11 footbridges, opaque with graffiti. Waltham Forest cycling is a SICK JOKE. jef costello
  • Score: 0

9:58pm Sat 26 Jun 10

Flaming June says...

Tom Thumb, you answered your own question when you used the 'v' word. It's vision that's sadly lacking in almost every area of this council's work and I don't see signs of a visionary approach developing any time soon.
Tom Thumb, you answered your own question when you used the 'v' word. It's vision that's sadly lacking in almost every area of this council's work and I don't see signs of a visionary approach developing any time soon. Flaming June
  • Score: 0

8:50am Sun 27 Jun 10

everoptimistic says...

Had a little day trip to Southend yesterday to escape the heat. They have installed a lovely cycle lane along the seafront. Two way and separate from cars and pedestrians. Perhaps Loakes and co could have a little jolly there to get some 'vision'. We could probably afford a cheap day return for them.

Have just read the password 'wave-idea' quite appropriate.
Had a little day trip to Southend yesterday to escape the heat. They have installed a lovely cycle lane along the seafront. Two way and separate from cars and pedestrians. Perhaps Loakes and co could have a little jolly there to get some 'vision'. We could probably afford a cheap day return for them. Have just read the password 'wave-idea' quite appropriate. everoptimistic
  • Score: 0

9:02am Sun 27 Jun 10

Silent Majority 2009 says...

As this is Olympic money it can only be spent in Cllr. Loakes' area. What he should be doing is demanding this money is spent creating routes to Stratford from accros the Borough. From the initial planning stage the Olympics was only going to be accessible by public transport and cycling. I have yet to see any plans of a dedicated cycle route from Chringford to Stratford. The transport experts have decided the Low Hall link is not cost effective so getting to Stratford from Chingford will be the usual nightmare. Come on Cllr Loakes get the Olympic money spent so that cyclists can get to the Olympics not just to give yourself a tick in the box in your ward.
As this is Olympic money it can only be spent in Cllr. Loakes' area. What he should be doing is demanding this money is spent creating routes to Stratford from accros the Borough. From the initial planning stage the Olympics was only going to be accessible by public transport and cycling. I have yet to see any plans of a dedicated cycle route from Chringford to Stratford. The transport experts have decided the Low Hall link is not cost effective so getting to Stratford from Chingford will be the usual nightmare. Come on Cllr Loakes get the Olympic money spent so that cyclists can get to the Olympics not just to give yourself a tick in the box in your ward. Silent Majority 2009
  • Score: 0

10:26am Sun 27 Jun 10

Tom Thumb says...

A good point Silent Majority. I would be interested to hear what route Councillor Loakes would recommend for someone wanting to cycle from The Green in Chingford to the Olympic site. It needs to be a cycle route that is direct, well maintained and safe enough for adults with children. That rules out the circuitous and badly maintained backstreet route to the Crooked Billet and also rules out nightmarish Chingford Mount Road.
There isn't one, is there? This Olympic money could be spent creating one but I'm not holding my breath that Loakes will be showering this money on Chingford or for that matter on decent cycling infrastructure anywhere. It will just be more painted lines on busy roads, with cycle lanes that buses stop in, cars can park in, and drivers are free to block when they get held up in jams.
A good point Silent Majority. I would be interested to hear what route Councillor Loakes would recommend for someone wanting to cycle from The Green in Chingford to the Olympic site. It needs to be a cycle route that is direct, well maintained and safe enough for adults with children. That rules out the circuitous and badly maintained backstreet route to the Crooked Billet and also rules out nightmarish Chingford Mount Road. There isn't one, is there? This Olympic money could be spent creating one but I'm not holding my breath that Loakes will be showering this money on Chingford or for that matter on decent cycling infrastructure anywhere. It will just be more painted lines on busy roads, with cycle lanes that buses stop in, cars can park in, and drivers are free to block when they get held up in jams. Tom Thumb
  • Score: 0

11:57am Sun 27 Jun 10

md-j says...

'From the initial planning stage the Olympics was only going to be accessible by public transport and cycling...'
Apart from the VIPS who, having mostly flown here, seemingly need to use Drapers Field for their cars: you were just referring to the peasants, weren't you?
'From the initial planning stage the Olympics was only going to be accessible by public transport and cycling...' Apart from the VIPS who, having mostly flown here, seemingly need to use Drapers Field for their cars: you were just referring to the peasants, weren't you? md-j
  • Score: 0

10:03am Mon 28 Jun 10

myopinioncounts says...

TomThumb says,"Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists."
The cars are legally parked, the height of the speed humps means car drivers have to drive up the middle of the road or risk damage to the underside of cars (buses and lorries can and do drive at speeds over the 20mph limit)and (I hope!) vehicle owners have paid tax and insurance to be there!
When cyclists pay towards the roads and have insurance to pay for the accidents they cause, or their own injuries, they deserve some consideration!
If more people had opposed the 'traffic calming' measures when they were given the chance to do so none of us would have to tackle this assault course.
TomThumb says,"Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists." The cars are legally parked, the height of the speed humps means car drivers have to drive up the middle of the road or risk damage to the underside of cars (buses and lorries can and do drive at speeds over the 20mph limit)and (I hope!) vehicle owners have paid tax and insurance to be there! When cyclists pay towards the roads and have insurance to pay for the accidents they cause, or their own injuries, they deserve some consideration! If more people had opposed the 'traffic calming' measures when they were given the chance to do so none of us would have to tackle this assault course. myopinioncounts
  • Score: 0

10:59am Mon 28 Jun 10

jef costello says...

myopinioncounts wrote:
TomThumb says,"Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists."
The cars are legally parked, the height of the speed humps means car drivers have to drive up the middle of the road or risk damage to the underside of cars (buses and lorries can and do drive at speeds over the 20mph limit)and (I hope!) vehicle owners have paid tax and insurance to be there!
When cyclists pay towards the roads and have insurance to pay for the accidents they cause, or their own injuries, they deserve some consideration!
If more people had opposed the 'traffic calming' measures when they were given the chance to do so none of us would have to tackle this assault course.
Not this myth again. "Road Tax" does not exist, and it hasn't since 1936. Look, if you pay income tax you pay for the roads, whether you've got a car or not. Perhaps you're thinking of "vehicle Excise Duty", which goes direct to the teasury. It's in effect a tax on owning a motorised vehicle.

And why do you think 'traffic calming' measures were brought in? For a laugh? It's because given the chance many London drivers go everywhere at 60mph, regardless of road conditions. The street I live on has a 20mph limit, ignored by many drivers who literally launch themselves over the speed bumps like Evel Kneivel.
[quote][p][bold]myopinioncounts[/bold] wrote: TomThumb says,"Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists." The cars are legally parked, the height of the speed humps means car drivers have to drive up the middle of the road or risk damage to the underside of cars (buses and lorries can and do drive at speeds over the 20mph limit)and (I hope!) vehicle owners have paid tax and insurance to be there! When cyclists pay towards the roads and have insurance to pay for the accidents they cause, or their own injuries, they deserve some consideration! If more people had opposed the 'traffic calming' measures when they were given the chance to do so none of us would have to tackle this assault course.[/p][/quote]Not this myth again. "Road Tax" does not exist, and it hasn't since 1936. Look, if you pay income tax you pay for the roads, whether you've got a car or not. Perhaps you're thinking of "vehicle Excise Duty", which goes direct to the teasury. It's in effect a tax on owning a motorised vehicle. And why do you think 'traffic calming' measures were brought in? For a laugh? It's because given the chance many London drivers go everywhere at 60mph, regardless of road conditions. The street I live on has a 20mph limit, ignored by many drivers who literally launch themselves over the speed bumps like Evel Kneivel. jef costello
  • Score: 0

2:53pm Mon 28 Jun 10

Nicholas Gascoine says...

Safe cycling?
Like that at the Hoe Stree / Selbourne Road / St Mary Road / Walthamstow Central Station crossroads?
Where the cycling-route lights have had Orange bags over them since November 2009????
Where you CAN'T cross the road safely because of this, whether on a bike, or on foot?
Because the incompetent and corrupt LBWF and the useless Tfl are playing pass-the parcel over responsibility with other people's lives?

What a (sick) joke.
Safe cycling? Like that at the Hoe Stree / Selbourne Road / St Mary Road / Walthamstow Central Station crossroads? Where the cycling-route lights have had Orange bags over them since November 2009???? Where you CAN'T cross the road safely because of this, whether on a bike, or on foot? Because the incompetent and corrupt LBWF and the useless Tfl are playing pass-the parcel over responsibility with other people's lives? What a (sick) joke. Nicholas Gascoine
  • Score: 0

7:44pm Mon 28 Jun 10

Tom Thumb says...

myopinioncounts wrote:
TomThumb says,"Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists." The cars are legally parked, the height of the speed humps means car drivers have to drive up the middle of the road or risk damage to the underside of cars (buses and lorries can and do drive at speeds over the 20mph limit)and (I hope!) vehicle owners have paid tax and insurance to be there! When cyclists pay towards the roads and have insurance to pay for the accidents they cause, or their own injuries, they deserve some consideration! If more people had opposed the 'traffic calming' measures when they were given the chance to do so none of us would have to tackle this assault course.
This is a nonsensical comment because first of all the rubber speed bumps cannot possibly damage anyone's vehicle, and secondly drivers aim for the two gaps surrounding the bumps, putting their vehicles OVER the bumps.
The problem is that people are allowed to park their cars in streets and pay nothing at all for the obstruction they cause, or at best a joke £30 a year.
All car parking on Coppermill Lane should be banned and instead a segregated two-way cycle path should be installed like in Holland. This is a major cycling route, after all.
The problem is that Waltham Forest's spineless councillors will always put car parking before cycling. But then none of them cycle, so this is not a surprise.
Pretending you can get people to cycle on streets full of parked cars and crazy drivers is nuts.
[quote][p][bold]myopinioncounts[/bold] wrote: TomThumb says,"Coppermill Lane is a joke cycling route because of all the parked cars between the Lea Valley and Walthamstow High Street and the stupid rubber speed bumps, which cause drivers to swerve at cyclists." The cars are legally parked, the height of the speed humps means car drivers have to drive up the middle of the road or risk damage to the underside of cars (buses and lorries can and do drive at speeds over the 20mph limit)and (I hope!) vehicle owners have paid tax and insurance to be there! When cyclists pay towards the roads and have insurance to pay for the accidents they cause, or their own injuries, they deserve some consideration! If more people had opposed the 'traffic calming' measures when they were given the chance to do so none of us would have to tackle this assault course.[/p][/quote]This is a nonsensical comment because first of all the rubber speed bumps cannot possibly damage anyone's vehicle, and secondly drivers aim for the two gaps surrounding the bumps, putting their vehicles OVER the bumps. The problem is that people are allowed to park their cars in streets and pay nothing at all for the obstruction they cause, or at best a joke £30 a year. All car parking on Coppermill Lane should be banned and instead a segregated two-way cycle path should be installed like in Holland. This is a major cycling route, after all. The problem is that Waltham Forest's spineless councillors will always put car parking before cycling. But then none of them cycle, so this is not a surprise. Pretending you can get people to cycle on streets full of parked cars and crazy drivers is nuts. Tom Thumb
  • Score: 0

7:26am Tue 29 Jun 10

rubberneck says...

It seems that these schemes are designed by people who have never been on a bike, get the lanes segregated properly like Sweden and well i do not know any others but there must be?
It seems that these schemes are designed by people who have never been on a bike, get the lanes segregated properly like Sweden and well i do not know any others but there must be? rubberneck
  • Score: 0

1:49pm Tue 29 Jun 10

livedheretoolong says...

One could almost feel sorry for Clyde Loakes 'bike enthusiast'. Years of neglect and incompetence by the previous failed administration have left him with a task of enormous magnitude.
There are so many things that need to be done it is difficult to know where to start. So here is a list of suggestions that might help:
1) Repair the roads. I though that the last government had pledged funds for this after the effects of the last winter (but they probably did not take into account that in Waltham Forest roads have not been repaired for YEARS). It would be quicker to provide a list of roads that don't need reapairing.
2) Clean the roads and cycle paths more often to remove all the broken glass and other debris. This alone would save cyclists a fortune in tyres and inner tubes. At present a tank would be more suitable to negotiate the likes of Wood Street, etc.
3) When building all the new cycle stands consider putting them in clusters as opposed to individually. Last Saturday morning I went to Walthamstow market and all of the cycle stands outside Walthamstow library were full. There is plenty of open space to build more. The individual stands are not much use as they are mostly taken by markert traders to chain their trolleys (as frequently pointed out by Crap Cycling but nothing is ever done about it). I feel safer locking my bike to the stands outside the library as they are more prominent. Similar groups of cycle stands should be placed in the middle and bottom end of the High Street plus all other public amenities and shopping areas in the borough.
4) Review all the cycling lanes in the borough. Remove all those where there is not enough space or have inexplicable gaps as they are a bit pointless.
4b) This is a strange one but I think they mixed up the paint when marking out the cycle lanes in the borough. If you observe the way pedestrians use the facility under Leytonstone roundabout you will see that almost without exception they walk in the cycle lane rather than the designated walking path. My suggestion would be to replace the existing red paint with green as used by LB Redbridge - check out the A1199 Woodford Road to see what I mean. As well as being much clearer to motorists it sends a symbolic message that cycling is 'green'
5) This one will be very difficult - lobby the Police and ask them to enforce the law regarding drivers using bike lanes, advanced stop lanes, etc. etc.
6) This one is easier - get your own spy cars to prioritise policing the above instead of giving tickets to people who put their parking vouchers in the wrong part of the windscreen.
Here's looking forward to the cycling utopia of the future!
One could almost feel sorry for Clyde Loakes 'bike enthusiast'. Years of neglect and incompetence by the previous failed administration have left him with a task of enormous magnitude. There are so many things that need to be done it is difficult to know where to start. So here is a list of suggestions that might help: 1) Repair the roads. I though that the last government had pledged funds for this after the effects of the last winter (but they probably did not take into account that in Waltham Forest roads have not been repaired for YEARS). It would be quicker to provide a list of roads that don't need reapairing. 2) Clean the roads and cycle paths more often to remove all the broken glass and other debris. This alone would save cyclists a fortune in tyres and inner tubes. At present a tank would be more suitable to negotiate the likes of Wood Street, etc. 3) When building all the new cycle stands consider putting them in clusters as opposed to individually. Last Saturday morning I went to Walthamstow market and all of the cycle stands outside Walthamstow library were full. There is plenty of open space to build more. The individual stands are not much use as they are mostly taken by markert traders to chain their trolleys (as frequently pointed out by Crap Cycling but nothing is ever done about it). I feel safer locking my bike to the stands outside the library as they are more prominent. Similar groups of cycle stands should be placed in the middle and bottom end of the High Street plus all other public amenities and shopping areas in the borough. 4) Review all the cycling lanes in the borough. Remove all those where there is not enough space or have inexplicable gaps as they are a bit pointless. 4b) This is a strange one but I think they mixed up the paint when marking out the cycle lanes in the borough. If you observe the way pedestrians use the facility under Leytonstone roundabout you will see that almost without exception they walk in the cycle lane rather than the designated walking path. My suggestion would be to replace the existing red paint with green as used by LB Redbridge - check out the A1199 Woodford Road to see what I mean. As well as being much clearer to motorists it sends a symbolic message that cycling is 'green' 5) This one will be very difficult - lobby the Police and ask them to enforce the law regarding drivers using bike lanes, advanced stop lanes, etc. etc. 6) This one is easier - get your own spy cars to prioritise policing the above instead of giving tickets to people who put their parking vouchers in the wrong part of the windscreen. Here's looking forward to the cycling utopia of the future! livedheretoolong
  • Score: 0

11:28pm Tue 29 Jun 10

Techno2 says...

livedheretoolong wrote:
One could almost feel sorry for Clyde Loakes 'bike enthusiast'. Years of neglect and incompetence by the previous failed administration have left him with a task of enormous magnitude. There are so many things that need to be done it is difficult to know where to start. So here is a list of suggestions that might help: 1) Repair the roads. I though that the last government had pledged funds for this after the effects of the last winter (but they probably did not take into account that in Waltham Forest roads have not been repaired for YEARS). It would be quicker to provide a list of roads that don't need reapairing. 2) Clean the roads and cycle paths more often to remove all the broken glass and other debris. This alone would save cyclists a fortune in tyres and inner tubes. At present a tank would be more suitable to negotiate the likes of Wood Street, etc. 3) When building all the new cycle stands consider putting them in clusters as opposed to individually. Last Saturday morning I went to Walthamstow market and all of the cycle stands outside Walthamstow library were full. There is plenty of open space to build more. The individual stands are not much use as they are mostly taken by markert traders to chain their trolleys (as frequently pointed out by Crap Cycling but nothing is ever done about it). I feel safer locking my bike to the stands outside the library as they are more prominent. Similar groups of cycle stands should be placed in the middle and bottom end of the High Street plus all other public amenities and shopping areas in the borough. 4) Review all the cycling lanes in the borough. Remove all those where there is not enough space or have inexplicable gaps as they are a bit pointless. 4b) This is a strange one but I think they mixed up the paint when marking out the cycle lanes in the borough. If you observe the way pedestrians use the facility under Leytonstone roundabout you will see that almost without exception they walk in the cycle lane rather than the designated walking path. My suggestion would be to replace the existing red paint with green as used by LB Redbridge - check out the A1199 Woodford Road to see what I mean. As well as being much clearer to motorists it sends a symbolic message that cycling is 'green' 5) This one will be very difficult - lobby the Police and ask them to enforce the law regarding drivers using bike lanes, advanced stop lanes, etc. etc. 6) This one is easier - get your own spy cars to prioritise policing the above instead of giving tickets to people who put their parking vouchers in the wrong part of the windscreen. Here's looking forward to the cycling utopia of the future!
The spy cars love to park in cycle lanes and force cyclists into the traffic so I wouldn't hold your breath over 6)
[quote][p][bold]livedheretoolong[/bold] wrote: One could almost feel sorry for Clyde Loakes 'bike enthusiast'. Years of neglect and incompetence by the previous failed administration have left him with a task of enormous magnitude. There are so many things that need to be done it is difficult to know where to start. So here is a list of suggestions that might help: 1) Repair the roads. I though that the last government had pledged funds for this after the effects of the last winter (but they probably did not take into account that in Waltham Forest roads have not been repaired for YEARS). It would be quicker to provide a list of roads that don't need reapairing. 2) Clean the roads and cycle paths more often to remove all the broken glass and other debris. This alone would save cyclists a fortune in tyres and inner tubes. At present a tank would be more suitable to negotiate the likes of Wood Street, etc. 3) When building all the new cycle stands consider putting them in clusters as opposed to individually. Last Saturday morning I went to Walthamstow market and all of the cycle stands outside Walthamstow library were full. There is plenty of open space to build more. The individual stands are not much use as they are mostly taken by markert traders to chain their trolleys (as frequently pointed out by Crap Cycling but nothing is ever done about it). I feel safer locking my bike to the stands outside the library as they are more prominent. Similar groups of cycle stands should be placed in the middle and bottom end of the High Street plus all other public amenities and shopping areas in the borough. 4) Review all the cycling lanes in the borough. Remove all those where there is not enough space or have inexplicable gaps as they are a bit pointless. 4b) This is a strange one but I think they mixed up the paint when marking out the cycle lanes in the borough. If you observe the way pedestrians use the facility under Leytonstone roundabout you will see that almost without exception they walk in the cycle lane rather than the designated walking path. My suggestion would be to replace the existing red paint with green as used by LB Redbridge - check out the A1199 Woodford Road to see what I mean. As well as being much clearer to motorists it sends a symbolic message that cycling is 'green' 5) This one will be very difficult - lobby the Police and ask them to enforce the law regarding drivers using bike lanes, advanced stop lanes, etc. etc. 6) This one is easier - get your own spy cars to prioritise policing the above instead of giving tickets to people who put their parking vouchers in the wrong part of the windscreen. Here's looking forward to the cycling utopia of the future![/p][/quote]The spy cars love to park in cycle lanes and force cyclists into the traffic so I wouldn't hold your breath over 6) Techno2
  • Score: 0

8:52am Fri 2 Jul 10

myopinioncounts says...

Tom Thumb lives in cloud cuckoo land!
A number of speed humps have started to lift, the bolts holding them coming loose, and DO scrape the bottom of our car.
Cars have to straddle single lines of humps and cyclists could pull over and let them pass first.
It seems to be a matter of honour that no cyclist puts a foot to the ground but must keep moving regardless.
I repeat that cars pay to use the roads (unlike cyclists) and what state would the roads be in without the money the comes from motorists?
Tom Thumb lives in cloud cuckoo land! A number of speed humps have started to lift, the bolts holding them coming loose, and DO scrape the bottom of our car. Cars have to straddle single lines of humps and cyclists could pull over and let them pass first. It seems to be a matter of honour that no cyclist puts a foot to the ground but must keep moving regardless. I repeat that cars pay to use the roads (unlike cyclists) and what state would the roads be in without the money the comes from motorists? myopinioncounts
  • Score: 0

10:46am Fri 2 Jul 10

livedheretoolong says...

myopinioncounts wrote:
Tom Thumb lives in cloud cuckoo land!
A number of speed humps have started to lift, the bolts holding them coming loose, and DO scrape the bottom of our car.
Cars have to straddle single lines of humps and cyclists could pull over and let them pass first.
It seems to be a matter of honour that no cyclist puts a foot to the ground but must keep moving regardless.
I repeat that cars pay to use the roads (unlike cyclists) and what state would the roads be in without the money the comes from motorists?
myopinioncounts, you're entitled to your opinion but I don't understand your logic of putting cyclists and car drivers into seperate compartments. I am a cyclist and choose to use the bike as a means of transport as generally speaking it is a lot quicker and more efficient for local journeys. I am also a car driver and use the car when necessary or for long journeys. So, I (along with all the other adult cyclists who drive) do actually pay road tax. Putting aside the fact that most of the tax revenues raised from motoring are not even spent on roads I am still just as entitled to use the roads as anyone else whether on my bike or in my car.
As Tom Thumb quite rightly points out these rubber speed bumps create a serious hazard because car drivers swerve towards cyclists when trying to drive round them. If you tried riding a bike yourself you would see just how dangerous it is.
The broken bumps that you mentioned create a serious hazard for cyclists - if your front wheel were to get trapped between the gaps it would cause a very nasty accident.
When driving I hate speed bumps just as much as anyone else but they have been put in for a purpose. If all car drivers obeyed the law they would not even be necessary.
I agree that the rubber bumps are a waste of time - any vehicle wider than a small car can drive across without having to slow down. It would be a lot better to put in proper speed bumps that straddle the whole width of the road. It may cause a slight problem for buses, etc. but they are often the worst culprits when it comes to ignoring the law.
[quote][p][bold]myopinioncounts[/bold] wrote: Tom Thumb lives in cloud cuckoo land! A number of speed humps have started to lift, the bolts holding them coming loose, and DO scrape the bottom of our car. Cars have to straddle single lines of humps and cyclists could pull over and let them pass first. It seems to be a matter of honour that no cyclist puts a foot to the ground but must keep moving regardless. I repeat that cars pay to use the roads (unlike cyclists) and what state would the roads be in without the money the comes from motorists?[/p][/quote]myopinioncounts, you're entitled to your opinion but I don't understand your logic of putting cyclists and car drivers into seperate compartments. I am a cyclist and choose to use the bike as a means of transport as generally speaking it is a lot quicker and more efficient for local journeys. I am also a car driver and use the car when necessary or for long journeys. So, I (along with all the other adult cyclists who drive) do actually pay road tax. Putting aside the fact that most of the tax revenues raised from motoring are not even spent on roads I am still just as entitled to use the roads as anyone else whether on my bike or in my car. As Tom Thumb quite rightly points out these rubber speed bumps create a serious hazard because car drivers swerve towards cyclists when trying to drive round them. If you tried riding a bike yourself you would see just how dangerous it is. The broken bumps that you mentioned create a serious hazard for cyclists - if your front wheel were to get trapped between the gaps it would cause a very nasty accident. When driving I hate speed bumps just as much as anyone else but they have been put in for a purpose. If all car drivers obeyed the law they would not even be necessary. I agree that the rubber bumps are a waste of time - any vehicle wider than a small car can drive across without having to slow down. It would be a lot better to put in proper speed bumps that straddle the whole width of the road. It may cause a slight problem for buses, etc. but they are often the worst culprits when it comes to ignoring the law. livedheretoolong
  • Score: 0

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