LEYTONSTONE: Rubbish campaign stepped up

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Cllr Clyde Loakes highlights the problem of littering on the borough’s streets Cllr Clyde Loakes highlights the problem of littering on the borough’s streets

HUNDREDS of bags of rubbish were dumped outside a Tube station to highlight the problem of litter in Waltham Forest.

An average of 16 tonnes of rubbish is dropped on the borough’s streets every day, costing the council £3.27m a year to clear up.

An event to raise awareness of the problem saw nine tonnes of rubbish left outside Leytonstone Tube station on Wednesday (January 5) in an attempt to deter litter bugs.

Church Lane was also left unswept for 24 hours to show the extent of the problem and drive home the message that clear-up costs could be better spent on other services.

Clyde Loakes, cabinet member for environment, said: “There is absolutely no excuse to litter in Waltham Forest.

"It’s lazy, unnecessary and costs us a fortune to clear up.

“We have over 1,800 bins dotted around our borough for people to use and we’re urging residents to think before they drop litter and help us reduce the financial burden on this borough.

“While we want people to voluntarily clean up their act, we’ll also be sending out enforcement officers who will be issuing £80 fixed penalty notices to people caught littering.”

Comments (7)

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1:14pm Fri 7 Jan 11

Techno2 says...

I hope someone will prosecute this stupid man for telling his staff to leave all this rubbish about in public places, thus potentially endangering public health, particularly at our transport hubs.

Fly tipping is a crime but the ends do NOT justify the means.
I hope someone will prosecute this stupid man for telling his staff to leave all this rubbish about in public places, thus potentially endangering public health, particularly at our transport hubs. Fly tipping is a crime but the ends do NOT justify the means. Techno2

2:05pm Fri 7 Jan 11

daveWood says...

How much is that litter caused by chicken and chip shops, etc that were supposed to have been restricted near schools?
Make them pay.
How much is that litter caused by chicken and chip shops, etc that were supposed to have been restricted near schools? Make them pay. daveWood

2:53pm Fri 7 Jan 11

Sam Hain says...

I was just thinking this morning on my way to the local shop as a street sweepting machine trundled past that were it not for thoughtless people dropping litter there would be virtually no need for street sweeping at all, apart from clearing up autumn leaf-fall. Sadly, I think the greater part of the problem is caused by children and young people - the chicken 'n' chip rubbish Dave Wood mentions almost exclusively so in my experience. I live on a school walk route which, despite being lined with litterbins at every junction, is always strewn with drinks cans and cartons, crisp packets and, yes, chicken 'n' chip boxes and papers every morning and afternoon. I also notice a large number of beer cans left by the street trees or pushed into garden hedges. I don't think we can blame children for this but, as many of the cans are of Polish beer I'm afraid I think I know where a large part blame lies. So, what are we to do about it? Well, for a start, our children need indoctrinating at the earliest possible age that dropping litter is not acceptable. I'm sure they would be susceptible to being shown how ecologically damaging litter can be for example. 'Rebellious' teenagers who think it's cool are a bigger problem to deal with and I'm not sure what the best tactic with them could be. Tackling them about it, as one would have unhesitatingly done in the past, would probably result in verbal, if not physical assault - and if not from them, from their outraged parents who know all about their offspring's 'rights' but care nothing for their responsibilities. As to street drinkers, whether from Eastern Europe or homegrown, more draconian measures are probably called for. Nevertheless, this sort of publicity stunt is misconceived, sending out confusing messages and probably only succeeding in offending those citizens who would never dream of dropping litter whilst going straight over the heads of those who habitually do so. Think again Cllr Loakes - wherever the answer lies it's almost certainly not in photo-opportunities.
I was just thinking this morning on my way to the local shop as a street sweepting machine trundled past that were it not for thoughtless people dropping litter there would be virtually no need for street sweeping at all, apart from clearing up autumn leaf-fall. Sadly, I think the greater part of the problem is caused by children and young people - the chicken 'n' chip rubbish Dave Wood mentions almost exclusively so in my experience. I live on a school walk route which, despite being lined with litterbins at every junction, is always strewn with drinks cans and cartons, crisp packets and, yes, chicken 'n' chip boxes and papers every morning and afternoon. I also notice a large number of beer cans left by the street trees or pushed into garden hedges. I don't think we can blame children for this but, as many of the cans are of Polish beer I'm afraid I think I know where a large part blame lies. So, what are we to do about it? Well, for a start, our children need indoctrinating at the earliest possible age that dropping litter is not acceptable. I'm sure they would be susceptible to being shown how ecologically damaging litter can be for example. 'Rebellious' teenagers who think it's cool are a bigger problem to deal with and I'm not sure what the best tactic with them could be. Tackling them about it, as one would have unhesitatingly done in the past, would probably result in verbal, if not physical assault - and if not from them, from their outraged parents who know all about their offspring's 'rights' but care nothing for their responsibilities. As to street drinkers, whether from Eastern Europe or homegrown, more draconian measures are probably called for. Nevertheless, this sort of publicity stunt is misconceived, sending out confusing messages and probably only succeeding in offending those citizens who would never dream of dropping litter whilst going straight over the heads of those who habitually do so. Think again Cllr Loakes - wherever the answer lies it's almost certainly not in photo-opportunities. Sam Hain

4:46pm Fri 7 Jan 11

AvidLondonReader says...

What bothers me even more is the amount of kids eating this fried chicken and chips every single night after school. It's the same faces in there each afternoon. Can't their mothers cook them a decent meal. Tantamount to child abuse I think. Also, where are these litter enforcers? I see people dropping litter outside shops every single day. They've only got to stand outside a fast food place to catch them. Hardly rocket science!
What bothers me even more is the amount of kids eating this fried chicken and chips every single night after school. It's the same faces in there each afternoon. Can't their mothers cook them a decent meal. Tantamount to child abuse I think. Also, where are these litter enforcers? I see people dropping litter outside shops every single day. They've only got to stand outside a fast food place to catch them. Hardly rocket science! AvidLondonReader

8:33pm Fri 7 Jan 11

mdj says...

I can't fault the message, but Mr Loakes needs to consider the wisdom of being snapped next to a huge pile of rubbish, for fear of comparisons being made.
A few years ago Leytonstone High Rd boasted a depot where you could get cash for taking aluminium cans: has the price of scrap fallen since then? Surely not. Can't we appeal to the entrepreneurial and competitive instincts of children to pick up cans? This might help them change their own attitude to what they drop at the same time.
I can't fault the message, but Mr Loakes needs to consider the wisdom of being snapped next to a huge pile of rubbish, for fear of comparisons being made. A few years ago Leytonstone High Rd boasted a depot where you could get cash for taking aluminium cans: has the price of scrap fallen since then? Surely not. Can't we appeal to the entrepreneurial and competitive instincts of children to pick up cans? This might help them change their own attitude to what they drop at the same time. mdj

3:07pm Sat 8 Jan 11

myopinioncounts says...

There is a group who use supermarket trolleys to transport metal through St. James' Park and the Low Hall Sports field, presumably taking it to a scrap metal yard. They dismantle things like vacuum cleaners and furniture in the park and dump the unwanted parts in and around the stream.
When I tried to tell them they could be fined for flytipping they obviously did not understand English.
All the signs around the borough warning about flytipping are useless if those doing it cannot read the signs!
There is a group who use supermarket trolleys to transport metal through St. James' Park and the Low Hall Sports field, presumably taking it to a scrap metal yard. They dismantle things like vacuum cleaners and furniture in the park and dump the unwanted parts in and around the stream. When I tried to tell them they could be fined for flytipping they obviously did not understand English. All the signs around the borough warning about flytipping are useless if those doing it cannot read the signs! myopinioncounts

12:54pm Mon 10 Jan 11

hotredman says...

Its a lot to do with the nature of people in this country. They are filthy and nasty, it is not just the young people as someone above mentioned. It is the older people as well.
I find it disgusting the way some people carry on and think it is acceptable to throw rubbish from car windows or drop ciggarette butts etc.
These same people then moan when they get fined from dropping a cigarete or piece of paper. GOOD, they deserve it.
One only has to look at how many nasty common people there are using public transport that think its acceptable to throw their rubbish on the floor or even on the seats. They dont use bins provided or hold the rubbish until they could find a bin. No wonder the place is full of rats.
Its a lot to do with the nature of people in this country. They are filthy and nasty, it is not just the young people as someone above mentioned. It is the older people as well. I find it disgusting the way some people carry on and think it is acceptable to throw rubbish from car windows or drop ciggarette butts etc. These same people then moan when they get fined from dropping a cigarete or piece of paper. GOOD, they deserve it. One only has to look at how many nasty common people there are using public transport that think its acceptable to throw their rubbish on the floor or even on the seats. They dont use bins provided or hold the rubbish until they could find a bin. No wonder the place is full of rats. hotredman

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