EPPING/LOUGHTON: Driver 'thought he had hit deer'

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Keith Scrivener Keith Scrivener

A RESTAURANT manager who thought he had hit a deer on a dark forest road was told by police he had killed a young father-of-two.

Christian Montagnon, 51, was driving home from Resto Bistro in Epping High Street when his car struck 34-year-old Keith Scrivener as he reached the High Road.

During a hearing into his death at New Bridge House, Chelmsford, his wife of six years, Amy Scrivener, said she had seen her husband off from their home in Tycehurst Hill, Loughton, which they shared with their children, aged five and three at the time, at about noon on Friday, August 5.

“He had cleaned his shoes that day and looked incredibly smart,” she said. “I commented on how smart he looked.”

The last time she spoke to her husband was when he told her he was going for a drink with his old friend Paul Berwick in The City at about 5.30pm.

Mr Scrivener headed home at about 11pm and it is thought he fell asleep on the Tube back towards Loughton and decided to walk home along the High Road, which was one of his favourite jogging routes and ran past a friend’s home in Bell Common.

The inquest heard that Mr Montagnon thought he had hit a deer when hi s car struck Mr Scrivener between 12.30am and 1am.

“I was just driving and suddenly I got covered with glass from the opposite window,” he said. “There was a sound like I’d hit a deer – a deep sound.”

He said he had stopped to check the car and look for an injured animal at the side of the road before driving home and sending his son, Tommy Clark-Montagnon, to search again the same night, in case he needed a picture of the deer for his insurers.

After hearing there had been a fatal crash in the High Road on Sunday, he and his son drove to Loughton police station, hoping to make sure he had not hit a person, but he was questioned by police, who had found fragments of his car at the scene.

He was later released without charge.

When asked by Sefton Kwasnik, representing Mr Scrivener’s family, whether he accepted his car hit him, Mr Montagnon said: “There’s been some forensic (evidence) on the car, so I have to accept it.”

Recording a narrative verdict at the inquest on Tuesday, Ms Harrington said: “The impact was contributed to by the fact that the road was dark and unlit and the deceased was walking along the side of the road that didn’t have a pathway.”

Mr Scrivener was described by his family as an “amazing” father, who was very fit and had run a half marathon the year before last.

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Comments (16)

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11:44am Thu 10 May 12

ClifftonX says...

I don't understand how Mr. Montagnon didn't see Mr Scrivener if he did, as he says, stop and have a look. Why didn't he tell the police straight away that he had an accident?
I don't understand how Mr. Montagnon didn't see Mr Scrivener if he did, as he says, stop and have a look. Why didn't he tell the police straight away that he had an accident? ClifftonX
  • Score: 0

2:58pm Thu 10 May 12

word of mouth says...

you do not need to report an accident if only the 1 vehicle is involved or nobody has been hurt. The driver here thought he hit a deer and couldn't find evidence to say otherwise. I feel sorry for all involved in this tragic inccident.
you do not need to report an accident if only the 1 vehicle is involved or nobody has been hurt. The driver here thought he hit a deer and couldn't find evidence to say otherwise. I feel sorry for all involved in this tragic inccident. word of mouth
  • Score: 0

3:14pm Thu 10 May 12

dtmgables says...

Felt no need to report it but then sent his son out to try and find evidence of the deer for a photo. makes a lot of sense that....
Felt no need to report it but then sent his son out to try and find evidence of the deer for a photo. makes a lot of sense that.... dtmgables
  • Score: 0

1:27pm Fri 11 May 12

Mr Ching says...

I suspect that the scum driver had been drinking. That is the reason he sent his son back. Why did he not go with his son? I hope he can sleep at night.
I suspect that the scum driver had been drinking. That is the reason he sent his son back. Why did he not go with his son? I hope he can sleep at night. Mr Ching
  • Score: 0

9:10pm Fri 11 May 12

boonio says...

As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!!
As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!! boonio
  • Score: 0

9:15pm Fri 11 May 12

boonio says...

dtmgables wrote:
Felt no need to report it but then sent his son out to try and find evidence of the deer for a photo. makes a lot of sense that....
Makes even more sense when his son was going to take a photo on his phone in the dark when the phone had no flash !!!
[quote][p][bold]dtmgables[/bold] wrote: Felt no need to report it but then sent his son out to try and find evidence of the deer for a photo. makes a lot of sense that....[/p][/quote]Makes even more sense when his son was going to take a photo on his phone in the dark when the phone had no flash !!! boonio
  • Score: 0

1:18pm Sat 12 May 12

MissCB says...

“There’s been some forensic (evidence) on the car, so I have to accept it.” Wow...Mr Mantagnon sounds very remorseful. His regret and heartfelt sorrow for killing Keith Scrivener must be of great comfort to the victims family!!!
“There’s been some forensic (evidence) on the car, so I have to accept it.” Wow...Mr Mantagnon sounds very remorseful. His regret and heartfelt sorrow for killing Keith Scrivener must be of great comfort to the victims family!!! MissCB
  • Score: 0

4:20pm Sat 12 May 12

word of mouth says...

boonio wrote:
As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!!
i would have thought that as a driving instructor you would have known that people become less aware of their surroundings and drive on 'autopilot' if they use the same road for a number of years, while a new younger driver will be more allert.
[quote][p][bold]boonio[/bold] wrote: As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!![/p][/quote]i would have thought that as a driving instructor you would have known that people become less aware of their surroundings and drive on 'autopilot' if they use the same road for a number of years, while a new younger driver will be more allert. word of mouth
  • Score: 0

8:05pm Sat 12 May 12

boonio says...

word of mouth wrote:
boonio wrote:
As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!!
i would have thought that as a driving instructor you would have known that people become less aware of their surroundings and drive on 'autopilot' if they use the same road for a number of years, while a new younger driver will be more allert.
Thank you for pointing out that drivers become less aware of there surroundings and drive on autopilot. However allow me to point out that the Driving Standard Agency's motto is "Safe Driving for Life" This motto does not change just because you drive a certain route everyday. Every journey should be treated with the same respect with regards safety, and this is for all road users alike. If as you suggest he was driving on "Autopilot" or less aware of his surroundings due to travelling this journey regularly this would surely be considered driving with undue care and attention.
[quote][p][bold]word of mouth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boonio[/bold] wrote: As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!![/p][/quote]i would have thought that as a driving instructor you would have known that people become less aware of their surroundings and drive on 'autopilot' if they use the same road for a number of years, while a new younger driver will be more allert.[/p][/quote]Thank you for pointing out that drivers become less aware of there surroundings and drive on autopilot. However allow me to point out that the Driving Standard Agency's motto is "Safe Driving for Life" This motto does not change just because you drive a certain route everyday. Every journey should be treated with the same respect with regards safety, and this is for all road users alike. If as you suggest he was driving on "Autopilot" or less aware of his surroundings due to travelling this journey regularly this would surely be considered driving with undue care and attention. boonio
  • Score: 0

11:25pm Sat 12 May 12

SlowEmotionReplay says...

The coroner said "the road was dark and unlit". I thought the purpose of car headlights was to illuminate the road. With no street lights the driver should have had his lights on full beam and been travelling at a speed where he could react to anything coming into view.

If the record of deaths and serious injury in our war zones was half as bad as the weekly figures for carnage on our roads it would be regarded as a scandal. Whereas, death and maiming by motorists is accepted as acceptable and treated as unavoidable - hence the blame free term 'accident' when so often they are clearly avoidable by following the highway code.
The coroner said "the road was dark and unlit". I thought the purpose of car headlights was to illuminate the road. With no street lights the driver should have had his lights on full beam and been travelling at a speed where he could react to anything coming into view. If the record of deaths and serious injury in our war zones was half as bad as the weekly figures for carnage on our roads it would be regarded as a scandal. Whereas, death and maiming by motorists is accepted as acceptable and treated as unavoidable - hence the blame free term 'accident' when so often they are clearly avoidable by following the highway code. SlowEmotionReplay
  • Score: 0

3:22am Sun 13 May 12

AppleCar says...

If anyone was able to watch Traffic Cops this week, you would have seen an almost identical case to this, whereby a young lad was killed cycling in the pitch black, with no reflectors, on an unlit A road. The driver also did not realise she had hit a person, thinking it was an animal. She stopped her car, got out and looked around but could not see anything, and so called her husband who came and drove the damaged car home. Only then did they think to ring and report it to the Police just in case, at which point the news was broken to them and she broke down in tears. This case showed just how such an accident is able to happen without the driver realising what has happened - she was totally unaware she had hit someone. I can understand emotions will be forcing some people to look for blame, but the sad fact is that it was a very dangerous and silly thing to do, and everyone is the victim of the event. There is nothing more that can be done, let it be and remember him for the father he was.
If anyone was able to watch Traffic Cops this week, you would have seen an almost identical case to this, whereby a young lad was killed cycling in the pitch black, with no reflectors, on an unlit A road. The driver also did not realise she had hit a person, thinking it was an animal. She stopped her car, got out and looked around but could not see anything, and so called her husband who came and drove the damaged car home. Only then did they think to ring and report it to the Police just in case, at which point the news was broken to them and she broke down in tears. This case showed just how such an accident is able to happen without the driver realising what has happened - she was totally unaware she had hit someone. I can understand emotions will be forcing some people to look for blame, but the sad fact is that it was a very dangerous and silly thing to do, and everyone is the victim of the event. There is nothing more that can be done, let it be and remember him for the father he was. AppleCar
  • Score: 0

9:48am Sun 13 May 12

dtmgables says...

AppleCar wrote:
If anyone was able to watch Traffic Cops this week, you would have seen an almost identical case to this, whereby a young lad was killed cycling in the pitch black, with no reflectors, on an unlit A road. The driver also did not realise she had hit a person, thinking it was an animal. She stopped her car, got out and looked around but could not see anything, and so called her husband who came and drove the damaged car home. Only then did they think to ring and report it to the Police just in case, at which point the news was broken to them and she broke down in tears. This case showed just how such an accident is able to happen without the driver realising what has happened - she was totally unaware she had hit someone. I can understand emotions will be forcing some people to look for blame, but the sad fact is that it was a very dangerous and silly thing to do, and everyone is the victim of the event. There is nothing more that can be done, let it be and remember him for the father he was.
You cannot possibly compare the case on traffic cops to this. Maybe you should understand a few key facts.

Firstly, the driver concerned did not report anything to the police until the Sunday afternoon. Strange how this seemed to tie back to when the police issued the details of the car they were looking for.

Secondly, the drivers son spent 2 hours searching the New Road after his father returned home, and then on the Saturday morning apparently failed to see a connection to the road being closed and the collision his father had been involved in that previous evening.

Thirdly, this driver owns a restaurant in Epping why was he not there on the Saturday evening? His busiest night of the week.

And in relation to the conditions that evening. This is a straight stretch of road, which is plauged by deer crossings. An experienced driver with 20 years experience of driving this road should have more than enough sense to be driving fully alert.

Maybe just maybe that 1 glass of wine he had with his dinner may have made the difference... We will never know, and it is very likely we will never get the full truth from someone who so far has showed absolutely no remorse for what happened that evening.

RIP Keith
[quote][p][bold]AppleCar[/bold] wrote: If anyone was able to watch Traffic Cops this week, you would have seen an almost identical case to this, whereby a young lad was killed cycling in the pitch black, with no reflectors, on an unlit A road. The driver also did not realise she had hit a person, thinking it was an animal. She stopped her car, got out and looked around but could not see anything, and so called her husband who came and drove the damaged car home. Only then did they think to ring and report it to the Police just in case, at which point the news was broken to them and she broke down in tears. This case showed just how such an accident is able to happen without the driver realising what has happened - she was totally unaware she had hit someone. I can understand emotions will be forcing some people to look for blame, but the sad fact is that it was a very dangerous and silly thing to do, and everyone is the victim of the event. There is nothing more that can be done, let it be and remember him for the father he was.[/p][/quote]You cannot possibly compare the case on traffic cops to this. Maybe you should understand a few key facts. Firstly, the driver concerned did not report anything to the police until the Sunday afternoon. Strange how this seemed to tie back to when the police issued the details of the car they were looking for. Secondly, the drivers son spent 2 hours searching the New Road after his father returned home, and then on the Saturday morning apparently failed to see a connection to the road being closed and the collision his father had been involved in that previous evening. Thirdly, this driver owns a restaurant in Epping why was he not there on the Saturday evening? His busiest night of the week. And in relation to the conditions that evening. This is a straight stretch of road, which is plauged by deer crossings. An experienced driver with 20 years experience of driving this road should have more than enough sense to be driving fully alert. Maybe just maybe that 1 glass of wine he had with his dinner may have made the difference... We will never know, and it is very likely we will never get the full truth from someone who so far has showed absolutely no remorse for what happened that evening. RIP Keith dtmgables
  • Score: 0

10:15am Sun 13 May 12

ClifftonX says...

dtmgables wrote:
AppleCar wrote:
If anyone was able to watch Traffic Cops this week, you would have seen an almost identical case to this, whereby a young lad was killed cycling in the pitch black, with no reflectors, on an unlit A road. The driver also did not realise she had hit a person, thinking it was an animal. She stopped her car, got out and looked around but could not see anything, and so called her husband who came and drove the damaged car home. Only then did they think to ring and report it to the Police just in case, at which point the news was broken to them and she broke down in tears. This case showed just how such an accident is able to happen without the driver realising what has happened - she was totally unaware she had hit someone. I can understand emotions will be forcing some people to look for blame, but the sad fact is that it was a very dangerous and silly thing to do, and everyone is the victim of the event. There is nothing more that can be done, let it be and remember him for the father he was.
You cannot possibly compare the case on traffic cops to this. Maybe you should understand a few key facts.

Firstly, the driver concerned did not report anything to the police until the Sunday afternoon. Strange how this seemed to tie back to when the police issued the details of the car they were looking for.

Secondly, the drivers son spent 2 hours searching the New Road after his father returned home, and then on the Saturday morning apparently failed to see a connection to the road being closed and the collision his father had been involved in that previous evening.

Thirdly, this driver owns a restaurant in Epping why was he not there on the Saturday evening? His busiest night of the week.

And in relation to the conditions that evening. This is a straight stretch of road, which is plauged by deer crossings. An experienced driver with 20 years experience of driving this road should have more than enough sense to be driving fully alert.

Maybe just maybe that 1 glass of wine he had with his dinner may have made the difference... We will never know, and it is very likely we will never get the full truth from someone who so far has showed absolutely no remorse for what happened that evening.

RIP Keith
well said
[quote][p][bold]dtmgables[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AppleCar[/bold] wrote: If anyone was able to watch Traffic Cops this week, you would have seen an almost identical case to this, whereby a young lad was killed cycling in the pitch black, with no reflectors, on an unlit A road. The driver also did not realise she had hit a person, thinking it was an animal. She stopped her car, got out and looked around but could not see anything, and so called her husband who came and drove the damaged car home. Only then did they think to ring and report it to the Police just in case, at which point the news was broken to them and she broke down in tears. This case showed just how such an accident is able to happen without the driver realising what has happened - she was totally unaware she had hit someone. I can understand emotions will be forcing some people to look for blame, but the sad fact is that it was a very dangerous and silly thing to do, and everyone is the victim of the event. There is nothing more that can be done, let it be and remember him for the father he was.[/p][/quote]You cannot possibly compare the case on traffic cops to this. Maybe you should understand a few key facts. Firstly, the driver concerned did not report anything to the police until the Sunday afternoon. Strange how this seemed to tie back to when the police issued the details of the car they were looking for. Secondly, the drivers son spent 2 hours searching the New Road after his father returned home, and then on the Saturday morning apparently failed to see a connection to the road being closed and the collision his father had been involved in that previous evening. Thirdly, this driver owns a restaurant in Epping why was he not there on the Saturday evening? His busiest night of the week. And in relation to the conditions that evening. This is a straight stretch of road, which is plauged by deer crossings. An experienced driver with 20 years experience of driving this road should have more than enough sense to be driving fully alert. Maybe just maybe that 1 glass of wine he had with his dinner may have made the difference... We will never know, and it is very likely we will never get the full truth from someone who so far has showed absolutely no remorse for what happened that evening. RIP Keith[/p][/quote]well said ClifftonX
  • Score: 0

10:36pm Sun 13 May 12

Walthamster says...

boonio wrote:
word of mouth wrote:
boonio wrote:
As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!!
i would have thought that as a driving instructor you would have known that people become less aware of their surroundings and drive on 'autopilot' if they use the same road for a number of years, while a new younger driver will be more allert.
Thank you for pointing out that drivers become less aware of there surroundings and drive on autopilot. However allow me to point out that the Driving Standard Agency's motto is "Safe Driving for Life" This motto does not change just because you drive a certain route everyday. Every journey should be treated with the same respect with regards safety, and this is for all road users alike. If as you suggest he was driving on "Autopilot" or less aware of his surroundings due to travelling this journey regularly this would surely be considered driving with undue care and attention.
I'd say boonio, as a driving instructor, knows what he or she is talking about.

Also, an injured person could often be saved if they get help in time. We'll never know if Keith Scrivener could have lived if the driver had called an ambulance at once. Sad story.
[quote][p][bold]boonio[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]word of mouth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boonio[/bold] wrote: As an Approved Driving Instructor I teach that you must be able to stop within the distance you can see to be safe. I had a student a while back who after 15 hours training managed to see someone on a similar Rd in poor light with dark clothing at a similar speed. Not only did they manage to see the person they also managed to avoid them safely. Pretty impressive that a student of 15 hours training can manage it, yet an experienced driver who has driven that Road for many many years has trouble. The guy doesn't even have to have a driving assesment !!! It's a Disgrace !!![/p][/quote]i would have thought that as a driving instructor you would have known that people become less aware of their surroundings and drive on 'autopilot' if they use the same road for a number of years, while a new younger driver will be more allert.[/p][/quote]Thank you for pointing out that drivers become less aware of there surroundings and drive on autopilot. However allow me to point out that the Driving Standard Agency's motto is "Safe Driving for Life" This motto does not change just because you drive a certain route everyday. Every journey should be treated with the same respect with regards safety, and this is for all road users alike. If as you suggest he was driving on "Autopilot" or less aware of his surroundings due to travelling this journey regularly this would surely be considered driving with undue care and attention.[/p][/quote]I'd say boonio, as a driving instructor, knows what he or she is talking about. Also, an injured person could often be saved if they get help in time. We'll never know if Keith Scrivener could have lived if the driver had called an ambulance at once. Sad story. Walthamster
  • Score: 0

4:54pm Mon 14 May 12

Mr Ching says...

The most shocking thing is the lack of remorse and people like AppleCar commenting like that. Hopefully, what goes around comes around.
The most shocking thing is the lack of remorse and people like AppleCar commenting like that. Hopefully, what goes around comes around. Mr Ching
  • Score: 0

3:52pm Fri 18 May 12

clifford104 says...

i would put money on the fact he had been drinking, i feel so sorry for the family. How do you live with yourself knowning you killed someone?
i would put money on the fact he had been drinking, i feel so sorry for the family. How do you live with yourself knowning you killed someone? clifford104
  • Score: 0

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