Essex Police to disband its mounted police unit as it bids to save £42 million by 2014

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Mounted Police on Limes Farm estate (file photo) Mounted Police on Limes Farm estate (file photo)

ESSEX Police is disbanding its mounted unit in a bid to save £600,000 a year.

The force is attempting to make savings of £42 million by 2014 and has already axed 807 posts across the county since April last year – including 324 police officers, 100 PCSOs and 383 staff.

The move comes less than five years after the mounted section was reformed, having been disbanded in 1999 due to budget cuts.

The unit comprises eight horses and nine riders, who are based in stables near Chelmsford and are deployed to help with crowd control, public order, open country searches and neighbourhood policing.

Assistant Chief Constable Sue Harrison said officers based with the unit would take up new roles elsewhere in the force

She said: "We know that the public, police officers and staff hold the mounted section in great affection and the unit has provided great service over the years.

"However the financial pressures we face need to be met head on and inevitably difficult decisions have to be made.

"If we were not to have taken this decision, then Essex Police would have had to lose an even greater number of officer posts from across the force.

"Securing a good home for the horses will continue to be paramount and we will explore all avenues to achieve this including transferring them to other forces.

"On behalf of all at Essex Police, I would like to express our gratitude for the fine work undertaken by the officers, staff and horses of our Mounted Section.”

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6:49pm Thu 11 Oct 12

xxxdave says...

dont makes these officers redundant, offer them front line foot patrols to see their service out and prevent massive pay offs again. Home the Horses are rehomed ok too...
dont makes these officers redundant, offer them front line foot patrols to see their service out and prevent massive pay offs again. Home the Horses are rehomed ok too... xxxdave
  • Score: 0

6:30am Fri 12 Oct 12

Cornbeefur says...

It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.
It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest. Cornbeefur
  • Score: 0

1:17pm Fri 12 Oct 12

UKIP-local says...

Whether you view this cut as an overdue efficiency or a regrettable loss of useful resources, there can be no doubt there will be more of this. The Conservative led coalition is spending more now that Labour (should I say "even more") but it feels the police budget should be cut severely.

To put it into context, 18 hours of what the government spends on the EU would pay for the whole of these cuts to Essex Police budgets.

You do have to wonder about the coalition's priorities.
Whether you view this cut as an overdue efficiency or a regrettable loss of useful resources, there can be no doubt there will be more of this. The Conservative led coalition is spending more now that Labour (should I say "even more") but it feels the police budget should be cut severely. To put it into context, 18 hours of what the government spends on the EU would pay for the whole of these cuts to Essex Police budgets. You do have to wonder about the coalition's priorities. UKIP-local
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Fri 12 Oct 12

Cornbeefur says...

UKIP-local wrote:
Whether you view this cut as an overdue efficiency or a regrettable loss of useful resources, there can be no doubt there will be more of this. The Conservative led coalition is spending more now that Labour (should I say "even more") but it feels the police budget should be cut severely.

To put it into context, 18 hours of what the government spends on the EU would pay for the whole of these cuts to Essex Police budgets.

You do have to wonder about the coalition's priorities.
Why do you not call for a EU Referendum then?

Gimmicks in planes is one thing but people want a referendum now so they can vote to stay in once and for all and give the coalitions a mandate and so on.
[quote][p][bold]UKIP-local[/bold] wrote: Whether you view this cut as an overdue efficiency or a regrettable loss of useful resources, there can be no doubt there will be more of this. The Conservative led coalition is spending more now that Labour (should I say "even more") but it feels the police budget should be cut severely. To put it into context, 18 hours of what the government spends on the EU would pay for the whole of these cuts to Essex Police budgets. You do have to wonder about the coalition's priorities.[/p][/quote]Why do you not call for a EU Referendum then? Gimmicks in planes is one thing but people want a referendum now so they can vote to stay in once and for all and give the coalitions a mandate and so on. Cornbeefur
  • Score: 0

10:08am Sat 13 Oct 12

fgdfsdf says...

Cornbeefur wrote:
It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.
Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job?

Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself.
[quote][p][bold]Cornbeefur[/bold] wrote: It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.[/p][/quote]Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job? Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself. fgdfsdf
  • Score: 0

11:17am Sat 13 Oct 12

Cornbeefur says...

fgdfsdf wrote:
Cornbeefur wrote:
It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.
Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job?

Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself.
I am familiar with what they do and as decribed, their job involves mainly grooming and exercising their horses and clearing out stables. They are glorious stable-hands. Why become a Stable-Hand on 12 K a year when you can join the Police and be on over 40K as a PC or Sergeant on 55K with all the perks for 30 years, to then retire on a Gilt Edged Pension?

They are unaffordable in these times of economical crisis and should all get back on the Beat.

Ok, they are used now and again in Football matches and the odd riot, but there are many that can be deployed around the UK as and when needed.

They are more likely to be seen in ceremonies and Horse Race meetings when the Police wear ceremonial Uniforms covered in scrambled egg decorations on their shoulders.

Police Stations have been getting shot of their attached Stables for years so it is nothing new.
[quote][p][bold]fgdfsdf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cornbeefur[/bold] wrote: It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.[/p][/quote]Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job? Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself.[/p][/quote]I am familiar with what they do and as decribed, their job involves mainly grooming and exercising their horses and clearing out stables. They are glorious stable-hands. Why become a Stable-Hand on 12 K a year when you can join the Police and be on over 40K as a PC or Sergeant on 55K with all the perks for 30 years, to then retire on a Gilt Edged Pension? They are unaffordable in these times of economical crisis and should all get back on the Beat. Ok, they are used now and again in Football matches and the odd riot, but there are many that can be deployed around the UK as and when needed. They are more likely to be seen in ceremonies and Horse Race meetings when the Police wear ceremonial Uniforms covered in scrambled egg decorations on their shoulders. Police Stations have been getting shot of their attached Stables for years so it is nothing new. Cornbeefur
  • Score: 0

12:38pm Sat 13 Oct 12

word of mouth says...

Right lets get this sorted. cornbeefur 40k a year starting wages, I think not, this is Essex not the Met and the pensions were all changed for the worse recently so back in your box son.
The horse units although useful in riots and BIG football matches (which Essex has very few of if any) are useless when making arrests as they will need to wait for a car or van and more officers, that could be out doing better things, to collect the suspect.
House to house work goes out the window because you can't lock the horse to stop it being stolen when the officer is in a house.
These officers would be better suited being put on push bikes or motor bikes if they want the ability to get around off road and in awkward places.
Right lets get this sorted. cornbeefur 40k a year starting wages, I think not, this is Essex not the Met and the pensions were all changed for the worse recently so back in your box son. The horse units although useful in riots and BIG football matches (which Essex has very few of if any) are useless when making arrests as they will need to wait for a car or van and more officers, that could be out doing better things, to collect the suspect. House to house work goes out the window because you can't lock the horse to stop it being stolen when the officer is in a house. These officers would be better suited being put on push bikes or motor bikes if they want the ability to get around off road and in awkward places. word of mouth
  • Score: 0

1:49pm Sat 13 Oct 12

fgdfsdf says...

Cornbeefur wrote:
fgdfsdf wrote:
Cornbeefur wrote: It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.
Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job? Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself.
I am familiar with what they do and as decribed, their job involves mainly grooming and exercising their horses and clearing out stables. They are glorious stable-hands. Why become a Stable-Hand on 12 K a year when you can join the Police and be on over 40K as a PC or Sergeant on 55K with all the perks for 30 years, to then retire on a Gilt Edged Pension? They are unaffordable in these times of economical crisis and should all get back on the Beat. Ok, they are used now and again in Football matches and the odd riot, but there are many that can be deployed around the UK as and when needed. They are more likely to be seen in ceremonies and Horse Race meetings when the Police wear ceremonial Uniforms covered in scrambled egg decorations on their shoulders. Police Stations have been getting shot of their attached Stables for years so it is nothing new.
An extract from the Met Police website;

Public Order; this duty is more defined and can range from a visible presence to intervention to resolve violent disorder at public order events. From a vantage point 8 feet high the Mounted Officer is afforded a view that is invaluable at crowded venues. From this position the officer can spot possible potentially violent confrontations or crush situations and alleviate the problem with crowd management tactics.

It is estimated that a trained Mounted Officer on a trained horse can be as effective as a dozen officers on foot in such situations.

The Mounted Branch today has a horse strength of about 120, a total of 150 officers plus civilian support staff. A normal tour of duty consists of a patrol of 3 to 4 hours, although at times this may be extended depending upon the duty they are required to perform.

150 x 12 x 1,800 police officers.

I do not disagree that cuts need to be made. This is an unfortunate result of current circumstances. I do object to your ignorant sweeping statements.

If you have ever spent any time around horses you will know that there are many advantages to having a well trained horse and rider in a situation.

Confrontation - a horse can be an intimidating presence and make those that would take part in a riot to think twice when faced with 1500lbs of horse flesh advancing at them. Alternatively that both the horse and rider will have been so well trained and will stay calm that they can stand their ground and control a crowd much more effectively than police officers on foot.

Public relations - most people are calmed by animals and this assists with general pr, making the face of public face of the police more approachable

Also not all crime takes place in urban areas. Their "leisurely ride" can take them to places and cover distances that police on foot cannot match.

Try to see the world outside of your narrow view sometimes.
[quote][p][bold]Cornbeefur[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]fgdfsdf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cornbeefur[/bold] wrote: It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.[/p][/quote]Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job? Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself.[/p][/quote]I am familiar with what they do and as decribed, their job involves mainly grooming and exercising their horses and clearing out stables. They are glorious stable-hands. Why become a Stable-Hand on 12 K a year when you can join the Police and be on over 40K as a PC or Sergeant on 55K with all the perks for 30 years, to then retire on a Gilt Edged Pension? They are unaffordable in these times of economical crisis and should all get back on the Beat. Ok, they are used now and again in Football matches and the odd riot, but there are many that can be deployed around the UK as and when needed. They are more likely to be seen in ceremonies and Horse Race meetings when the Police wear ceremonial Uniforms covered in scrambled egg decorations on their shoulders. Police Stations have been getting shot of their attached Stables for years so it is nothing new.[/p][/quote]An extract from the Met Police website; Public Order; this duty is more defined and can range from a visible presence to intervention to resolve violent disorder at public order events. From a vantage point 8 feet high the Mounted Officer is afforded a view that is invaluable at crowded venues. From this position the officer can spot possible potentially violent confrontations or crush situations and alleviate the problem with crowd management tactics. It is estimated that a trained Mounted Officer on a trained horse can be as effective as a dozen officers on foot in such situations. The Mounted Branch today has a horse strength of about 120, a total of 150 officers plus civilian support staff. A normal tour of duty consists of a patrol of 3 to 4 hours, although at times this may be extended depending upon the duty they are required to perform. 150 x 12 x 1,800 police officers. I do not disagree that cuts need to be made. This is an unfortunate result of current circumstances. I do object to your ignorant sweeping statements. If you have ever spent any time around horses you will know that there are many advantages to having a well trained horse and rider in a situation. Confrontation - a horse can be an intimidating presence and make those that would take part in a riot to think twice when faced with 1500lbs of horse flesh advancing at them. Alternatively that both the horse and rider will have been so well trained and will stay calm that they can stand their ground and control a crowd much more effectively than police officers on foot. Public relations - most people are calmed by animals and this assists with general pr, making the face of public face of the police more approachable Also not all crime takes place in urban areas. Their "leisurely ride" can take them to places and cover distances that police on foot cannot match. Try to see the world outside of your narrow view sometimes. fgdfsdf
  • Score: 0

2:08pm Sat 13 Oct 12

Cornbeefur says...

word of mouth wrote:
Right lets get this sorted. cornbeefur 40k a year starting wages, I think not, this is Essex not the Met and the pensions were all changed for the worse recently so back in your box son.
The horse units although useful in riots and BIG football matches (which Essex has very few of if any) are useless when making arrests as they will need to wait for a car or van and more officers, that could be out doing better things, to collect the suspect.
House to house work goes out the window because you can't lock the horse to stop it being stolen when the officer is in a house.
These officers would be better suited being put on push bikes or motor bikes if they want the ability to get around off road and in awkward places.
Nay, you are wrong Sir.

So you have answered my point then thank you, they are a useless arm of the Police and not fit for purpose.

That is exactly why they are getting shot of them, precisely.

regarding the pensions, most of the Mounted Officers are older more experienced and subject to the previous Gold Plated pension Schemes under the old rules. As such they command the better wages of 40k and get all sorts of allowances for hay and clothing.
[quote][p][bold]word of mouth[/bold] wrote: Right lets get this sorted. cornbeefur 40k a year starting wages, I think not, this is Essex not the Met and the pensions were all changed for the worse recently so back in your box son. The horse units although useful in riots and BIG football matches (which Essex has very few of if any) are useless when making arrests as they will need to wait for a car or van and more officers, that could be out doing better things, to collect the suspect. House to house work goes out the window because you can't lock the horse to stop it being stolen when the officer is in a house. These officers would be better suited being put on push bikes or motor bikes if they want the ability to get around off road and in awkward places.[/p][/quote]Nay, you are wrong Sir. So you have answered my point then thank you, they are a useless arm of the Police and not fit for purpose. That is exactly why they are getting shot of them, precisely. regarding the pensions, most of the Mounted Officers are older more experienced and subject to the previous Gold Plated pension Schemes under the old rules. As such they command the better wages of 40k and get all sorts of allowances for hay and clothing. Cornbeefur
  • Score: 0

2:10pm Sat 13 Oct 12

Cornbeefur says...

fgdfsdf wrote:
Cornbeefur wrote:
fgdfsdf wrote:
Cornbeefur wrote: It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.
Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job? Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself.
I am familiar with what they do and as decribed, their job involves mainly grooming and exercising their horses and clearing out stables. They are glorious stable-hands. Why become a Stable-Hand on 12 K a year when you can join the Police and be on over 40K as a PC or Sergeant on 55K with all the perks for 30 years, to then retire on a Gilt Edged Pension? They are unaffordable in these times of economical crisis and should all get back on the Beat. Ok, they are used now and again in Football matches and the odd riot, but there are many that can be deployed around the UK as and when needed. They are more likely to be seen in ceremonies and Horse Race meetings when the Police wear ceremonial Uniforms covered in scrambled egg decorations on their shoulders. Police Stations have been getting shot of their attached Stables for years so it is nothing new.
An extract from the Met Police website;

Public Order; this duty is more defined and can range from a visible presence to intervention to resolve violent disorder at public order events. From a vantage point 8 feet high the Mounted Officer is afforded a view that is invaluable at crowded venues. From this position the officer can spot possible potentially violent confrontations or crush situations and alleviate the problem with crowd management tactics.

It is estimated that a trained Mounted Officer on a trained horse can be as effective as a dozen officers on foot in such situations.

The Mounted Branch today has a horse strength of about 120, a total of 150 officers plus civilian support staff. A normal tour of duty consists of a patrol of 3 to 4 hours, although at times this may be extended depending upon the duty they are required to perform.

150 x 12 x 1,800 police officers.

I do not disagree that cuts need to be made. This is an unfortunate result of current circumstances. I do object to your ignorant sweeping statements.

If you have ever spent any time around horses you will know that there are many advantages to having a well trained horse and rider in a situation.

Confrontation - a horse can be an intimidating presence and make those that would take part in a riot to think twice when faced with 1500lbs of horse flesh advancing at them. Alternatively that both the horse and rider will have been so well trained and will stay calm that they can stand their ground and control a crowd much more effectively than police officers on foot.

Public relations - most people are calmed by animals and this assists with general pr, making the face of public face of the police more approachable

Also not all crime takes place in urban areas. Their "leisurely ride" can take them to places and cover distances that police on foot cannot match.

Try to see the world outside of your narrow view sometimes.
How many Police Horses do you see daily patrolling for 3 or 4 hours? They patrol the parks mainly for a leisurely ride. On 40 K plus a year too.

Nice if you can get it.
[quote][p][bold]fgdfsdf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cornbeefur[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]fgdfsdf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cornbeefur[/bold] wrote: It does seem crazy that Police Officers on 40k a year or more are employed as such when most of their shift is spent grooming the horses and having a leisurely ride around parks and the Forest.[/p][/quote]Cornbeefur, have you ever been involved with the police officers that do this job? Do you know what their job involves? Do you not understand that looking after the welfare of the horses allow those horses to do their job? Until you can say yes to any of the above I would suggest you keep such pointless opinions to yourself.[/p][/quote]I am familiar with what they do and as decribed, their job involves mainly grooming and exercising their horses and clearing out stables. They are glorious stable-hands. Why become a Stable-Hand on 12 K a year when you can join the Police and be on over 40K as a PC or Sergeant on 55K with all the perks for 30 years, to then retire on a Gilt Edged Pension? They are unaffordable in these times of economical crisis and should all get back on the Beat. Ok, they are used now and again in Football matches and the odd riot, but there are many that can be deployed around the UK as and when needed. They are more likely to be seen in ceremonies and Horse Race meetings when the Police wear ceremonial Uniforms covered in scrambled egg decorations on their shoulders. Police Stations have been getting shot of their attached Stables for years so it is nothing new.[/p][/quote]An extract from the Met Police website; Public Order; this duty is more defined and can range from a visible presence to intervention to resolve violent disorder at public order events. From a vantage point 8 feet high the Mounted Officer is afforded a view that is invaluable at crowded venues. From this position the officer can spot possible potentially violent confrontations or crush situations and alleviate the problem with crowd management tactics. It is estimated that a trained Mounted Officer on a trained horse can be as effective as a dozen officers on foot in such situations. The Mounted Branch today has a horse strength of about 120, a total of 150 officers plus civilian support staff. A normal tour of duty consists of a patrol of 3 to 4 hours, although at times this may be extended depending upon the duty they are required to perform. 150 x 12 x 1,800 police officers. I do not disagree that cuts need to be made. This is an unfortunate result of current circumstances. I do object to your ignorant sweeping statements. If you have ever spent any time around horses you will know that there are many advantages to having a well trained horse and rider in a situation. Confrontation - a horse can be an intimidating presence and make those that would take part in a riot to think twice when faced with 1500lbs of horse flesh advancing at them. Alternatively that both the horse and rider will have been so well trained and will stay calm that they can stand their ground and control a crowd much more effectively than police officers on foot. Public relations - most people are calmed by animals and this assists with general pr, making the face of public face of the police more approachable Also not all crime takes place in urban areas. Their "leisurely ride" can take them to places and cover distances that police on foot cannot match. Try to see the world outside of your narrow view sometimes.[/p][/quote]How many Police Horses do you see daily patrolling for 3 or 4 hours? They patrol the parks mainly for a leisurely ride. On 40 K plus a year too. Nice if you can get it. Cornbeefur
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