Nearly a fifth of Epping Forest's children living in poverty, campaign says

First published in Epping Forest
Last updated
East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Sub Editor

Nearly a fifth of children in the district are living in poverty, according to statistics released today.

The Campaign to End Child Poverty says 16 per cent of children in the Epping Forest district are living in families getting by on less than 60 per cent of the national median average income of about £26,500.

The figure is the same as the campaign group gives for Braintree and Welwyn Hatfield, Hertfordshire.

Norwich has the highest rate of child poverty in the east of England, according to the figures.

Enver Solomon, chairman of the campaign, said: “While the levels of deprivation in the east of England are not as high as other parts of the country, there are still far too many children whose parents are struggling to make a living.

“We’re calling on authorities to prioritise low-income families in the decisions they make about local welfare spending.”

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:56am Wed 20 Feb 13

Cornbeefur says...

How do you class poverty?

If you do not have have the latest xbox, ipods,52 inch screens TV?

We use to class poverty when we had no heating or food.

These days many so called families on poverty line (like the Lady with 11 children in the news this week) is only having a six bed house built for her and only has one horse to share for her 11 kids.
How do you class poverty? If you do not have have the latest xbox, ipods,52 inch screens TV? We use to class poverty when we had no heating or food. These days many so called families on poverty line (like the Lady with 11 children in the news this week) is only having a six bed house built for her and only has one horse to share for her 11 kids. Cornbeefur
  • Score: 0

4:21pm Wed 20 Feb 13

Techno3 says...

The campaign is an umbrella for about 150 organisations. Some of these are no doubt sincere enough, but the list includes a suspiciously high number of organisations, run by bosses on six figure salaries and gold plated pensions.

The list includes the Communications Workers Union, TGWU, the Trades Union Congress and Unite. They believe in taxing the very poorest in our society to pay for the very generous salaries of their full-time union officials in the public sector.
The campaign is an umbrella for about 150 organisations. Some of these are no doubt sincere enough, but the list includes a suspiciously high number of organisations, run by bosses on six figure salaries and gold plated pensions. The list includes the Communications Workers Union, TGWU, the Trades Union Congress and Unite. They believe in taxing the very poorest in our society to pay for the very generous salaries of their full-time union officials in the public sector. Techno3
  • Score: 0

5:07pm Wed 20 Feb 13

Trevor 2 says...

Techno3 wrote:
The campaign is an umbrella for about 150 organisations. Some of these are no doubt sincere enough, but the list includes a suspiciously high number of organisations, run by bosses on six figure salaries and gold plated pensions.

The list includes the Communications Workers Union, TGWU, the Trades Union Congress and Unite. They believe in taxing the very poorest in our society to pay for the very generous salaries of their full-time union officials in the public sector.
Totally agree!
[quote][p][bold]Techno3[/bold] wrote: The campaign is an umbrella for about 150 organisations. Some of these are no doubt sincere enough, but the list includes a suspiciously high number of organisations, run by bosses on six figure salaries and gold plated pensions. The list includes the Communications Workers Union, TGWU, the Trades Union Congress and Unite. They believe in taxing the very poorest in our society to pay for the very generous salaries of their full-time union officials in the public sector.[/p][/quote]Totally agree! Trevor 2
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree