LEYTON: Bomb found at Olympics building site

LEYTON: Bomb 'found at Olympics building site'

LEYTON: Bomb 'found at Olympics building site'

First published in Waltham Forest East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Photograph of the Author by , Senior reporter

A BOMB from the Second World War was unearthed today at the building site for an Olympics training venue.

The device was discovered behind the Lee Valley Ice Centre in Lea Bridge Road, Leyton, at around 10am today (Wednesday March 14).

Construction teams are currently building a temporary basketball hall there which will be used for training by athletes during the Games later this summer.

The bomb has now been made safe and removed.

A Met spokesman said: "Police were called to Leyton Marshes to reports of a suspected unexploded World War 2 bomb being discovered at the site.

"The area was cordoned of and the site evacuated as a precaution, whilst EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) officers made the bomb safe."

Katy Andrews, of the Save Leyton Marshes campaign group, said the apparent discovery raised questions about the amount of preparation that had gone into the bid to build the temporary building.

She said: "We've been told there was a site survey for contamination before work began, but how thorough was it if they didn't spot this?

"This survey wasn't submitted as part of the planning application to Waltham Forest Council either.

"Residents are worried and wondering what else could be there that hasn't been discovered yet."

A spokesman for the Olympic Delivery Authority said: “A small Second World War incendiary device, weighing around a kilogram, was safely removed this morning from the site of a temporary Games-time basketball training venue on Leyton Marsh.

"A routine scan of the site in early February detected metal underground and because of this, an ordnance expert was appointed to oversee the start of works.

"Police were immediately contacted after the device was discovered and it was later removed by specialist officers.

"At no time were nearby people or property put at risk and work has now resumed on site.”

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Comments (23)

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3:06pm Wed 14 Mar 12

BarryBRB says...

I have asked Waltham Forest council whether before construction started the site was searched for unexploded bombs. Such a search was carried out over the river in Hackney before work started on the Lathams development. The council havent yet responded.
I have asked Waltham Forest council whether before construction started the site was searched for unexploded bombs. Such a search was carried out over the river in Hackney before work started on the Lathams development. The council havent yet responded. BarryBRB
  • Score: 0

4:33pm Wed 14 Mar 12

mdj says...

Well Barry, since the Council decided on the new plan for Lloyd Park before seeing what was going to be under the proposed new installations (asbestos, a 6ft Victorian sewer), don't hold your breath!
Well Barry, since the Council decided on the new plan for Lloyd Park before seeing what was going to be under the proposed new installations (asbestos, a 6ft Victorian sewer), don't hold your breath! mdj
  • Score: 0

5:05pm Wed 14 Mar 12

ShinySue says...

Well I think its very exciting, that we still have UXB's dotted around...adds to the excitement!
Well I think its very exciting, that we still have UXB's dotted around...adds to the excitement! ShinySue
  • Score: 0

5:20pm Wed 14 Mar 12

BarryBRB says...

The ODA are engaged in a damage limitation PR exercise. They have to explain that whilst the sites workers were correctly evacuated to the Ice Rink car park no attempt was made to prevent members of the public going right up to the site. I doubt if the ODA have any idea about what's below the site.
The ODA are engaged in a damage limitation PR exercise. They have to explain that whilst the sites workers were correctly evacuated to the Ice Rink car park no attempt was made to prevent members of the public going right up to the site. I doubt if the ODA have any idea about what's below the site. BarryBRB
  • Score: 0

6:09pm Wed 14 Mar 12

hatemordor says...

"At no time were nearby people or property put at risk and work has now resumed on site"

So an unexploded bomb is does not put people at risk?
"At no time were nearby people or property put at risk and work has now resumed on site" So an unexploded bomb is does not put people at risk? hatemordor
  • Score: 0

8:01pm Wed 14 Mar 12

Chappo says...

Hmmm! I am surprised that the constructors did not consult the governments unexploded bomb list as they should, this bomb is clearly indicated. There is another one in the Lea as well. Some people in East London might be surprised that they have a UXB in their back garden. These bombs have been left there, as they have gone very deep into the London clay and are considered as no risk. However Allied bombs in Germany`s soil have a very high risk when disturbed and only a couple of years ago, one killed a few people.
Hmmm! I am surprised that the constructors did not consult the governments unexploded bomb list as they should, this bomb is clearly indicated. There is another one in the Lea as well. Some people in East London might be surprised that they have a UXB in their back garden. These bombs have been left there, as they have gone very deep into the London clay and are considered as no risk. However Allied bombs in Germany`s soil have a very high risk when disturbed and only a couple of years ago, one killed a few people. Chappo
  • Score: 0

9:20pm Wed 14 Mar 12

dukes of hazzard says...

Erm, it was found at he back of the ice rink on lea bridge road, which from memory has been there before most of the oda were born! Cheap headline to spoil the thrill of the games.
Erm, it was found at he back of the ice rink on lea bridge road, which from memory has been there before most of the oda were born! Cheap headline to spoil the thrill of the games. dukes of hazzard
  • Score: 0

9:49pm Wed 14 Mar 12

goodgardener says...

Sadly, the thrill of the games was spolied the moment the ODA and Waltham Forest Council decided to trample all over the planning guidelines, the will of local residents and the environement.
Sadly, the thrill of the games was spolied the moment the ODA and Waltham Forest Council decided to trample all over the planning guidelines, the will of local residents and the environement. goodgardener
  • Score: 0

10:50pm Wed 14 Mar 12

BarryBRB says...

I don't understand dukes of hazards comment. The device was not found at the back of the ice rink. It was found on the basketball site. The ODA admit this in their statement above.
I don't understand dukes of hazards comment. The device was not found at the back of the ice rink. It was found on the basketball site. The ODA admit this in their statement above. BarryBRB
  • Score: 0

11:00pm Wed 14 Mar 12

Minxey says...

Anyone brought up in East London knows that the area is a hotspot for UXBs. Don't people know their history - you know, the Blitz?!
Anyone brought up in East London knows that the area is a hotspot for UXBs. Don't people know their history - you know, the Blitz?! Minxey
  • Score: 0

11:43pm Wed 14 Mar 12

dukes of hazzard says...

Barry, the ice rink is next to the basketball practice arena. Ie, it's not in Stratford in the main Olympic village.
Barry, the ice rink is next to the basketball practice arena. Ie, it's not in Stratford in the main Olympic village. dukes of hazzard
  • Score: 0

6:56am Thu 15 Mar 12

BarryBRB says...

I really don't understand what the dukes of hazzard is going on about. I know the difference between Leyton Marsh and Stratford!
I really don't understand what the dukes of hazzard is going on about. I know the difference between Leyton Marsh and Stratford! BarryBRB
  • Score: 0

9:21am Thu 15 Mar 12

Sam Hain says...

He seems to be saying, BarryBRB, that it's ok for us to be blown up in Waltham Forest as long as nothing untoward happens in the Olympic Village.
He seems to be saying, BarryBRB, that it's ok for us to be blown up in Waltham Forest as long as nothing untoward happens in the Olympic Village. Sam Hain
  • Score: 0

10:12am Thu 15 Mar 12

JoanYe says...

As well as unexploded ordnance it is more than likely that the rubble underneath Leyton Marsh contains asbestos. Asbestos was a very common building material since the 19th century because of its sound absorption and fire retardant properties. By the mid 20th century its uses included fire retardant coatings, concrete, bricks, pipes and fireplace cement, heat, fire, and acid resistant gaskets, pipe insulation, ceiling insulation, fireproof drywall, flooring, roofing, lawn furniture, and drywall joint compound. From what I remember, it was not phased out until the 1970s. If it is left where it is under the soil on Leyton Marsh it is safe but not if it is dug up and left in heaps for the wind to catch.
As well as unexploded ordnance it is more than likely that the rubble underneath Leyton Marsh contains asbestos. Asbestos was a very common building material since the 19th century because of its sound absorption and fire retardant properties. By the mid 20th century its uses included fire retardant coatings, concrete, bricks, pipes and fireplace cement, heat, fire, and acid resistant gaskets, pipe insulation, ceiling insulation, fireproof drywall, flooring, roofing, lawn furniture, and drywall joint compound. From what I remember, it was not phased out until the 1970s. If it is left where it is under the soil on Leyton Marsh it is safe but not if it is dug up and left in heaps for the wind to catch. JoanYe
  • Score: 0

11:15am Thu 15 Mar 12

John001 says...

The explosive content of wartime bombs can become unstable after a certain amount of time, and it is certainly possible for them to suddenly explode if disturbed, although this is considered unlikely.

The primary factor in all UXB's is the type of fuse used. A Type 15 (impact) fuse would most likely be non-viable after all this time. However, a Type 17 (clockwork, delayed action) fuse is a different matter. It will be remembered that a SC-1000 ("Hermann") bomb was discovered in Stratford a couple of years ago during work on the Olympic site. When the Bomb Disposal Officer inspected it, he discovered the clock had started ticking again. There is also no way of knowing how long the clock was set to run, as this was entirely at the discretion of the German armourer who set the fuse. It could be for any length of time between ninety minutes and eighty hours.

Then there is the matter of the Type 50 (anti-handling) fuse.....

By the way, I doubt there is still a bomb in the stretch of the River Lea near Leyton Marsh. This stretch has been dredged at least twice since the 1960's.
The explosive content of wartime bombs can become unstable after a certain amount of time, and it is certainly possible for them to suddenly explode if disturbed, although this is considered unlikely. The primary factor in all UXB's is the type of fuse used. A Type 15 (impact) fuse would most likely be non-viable after all this time. However, a Type 17 (clockwork, delayed action) fuse is a different matter. It will be remembered that a SC-1000 ("Hermann") bomb was discovered in Stratford a couple of years ago during work on the Olympic site. When the Bomb Disposal Officer inspected it, he discovered the clock had started ticking again. There is also no way of knowing how long the clock was set to run, as this was entirely at the discretion of the German armourer who set the fuse. It could be for any length of time between ninety minutes and eighty hours. Then there is the matter of the Type 50 (anti-handling) fuse..... By the way, I doubt there is still a bomb in the stretch of the River Lea near Leyton Marsh. This stretch has been dredged at least twice since the 1960's. John001
  • Score: 0

12:38pm Thu 15 Mar 12

Claxon Foghorn says...

ShinySue wrote:
Well I think its very exciting, that we still have UXB's dotted around...adds to the excitement!
I think this comment is an absolute insult to the victims of the London Blitz. It was not exciting when people were killed after a bomb raid.
[quote][p][bold]ShinySue[/bold] wrote: Well I think its very exciting, that we still have UXB's dotted around...adds to the excitement![/p][/quote]I think this comment is an absolute insult to the victims of the London Blitz. It was not exciting when people were killed after a bomb raid. Claxon Foghorn
  • Score: 0

3:26pm Thu 15 Mar 12

ShinySue says...

Complete overreaction Foghorn, if you want an insult here's one....actually, forget it, i cant be bothered...
Complete overreaction Foghorn, if you want an insult here's one....actually, forget it, i cant be bothered... ShinySue
  • Score: 0

4:20pm Thu 15 Mar 12

Chappo says...

The bombs still deep below the Lea are well below the dredging level. As are the four on the Old Latham Timber site which now has houses built over them. One only has to check the official UXB list for London. As an indication of how many actually did go off. The book "War over Walthamstow" is an interesting read and was compiled using A.R.P. records. One only has to look around the streets and wonder why there are a couple of post war buildings, stuck in the middle of a Victorian terrace.
The bombs still deep below the Lea are well below the dredging level. As are the four on the Old Latham Timber site which now has houses built over them. One only has to check the official UXB list for London. As an indication of how many actually did go off. The book "War over Walthamstow" is an interesting read and was compiled using A.R.P. records. One only has to look around the streets and wonder why there are a couple of post war buildings, stuck in the middle of a Victorian terrace. Chappo
  • Score: 0

8:27pm Thu 15 Mar 12

Redfox says...

Several things occur to me - lot of uninformed comment about WW2 records of ordnance dropped by the Germans, some of whom will be related to many of those Nazi's who flew in the planes that dropped the stuff! Let's not forget either the beastly Huns also flew over Britain & London droppingbombs in the First World War too, killing 1400+ innocent civilians. It would do no harm if ALL 2012 visitors to GB were informed of this by the money-grabbing Blue Badge Guides showing people around the sites, instead of waffling on about tidying up a "neglected area".What tosh. All those relocated businesses still waiting for decent compensation to be paid out. A slight correction is needed too for W.O.W. does not cover Leyton, nor is there either a definitive UXB list for Greater London - let alone a single council area. It's no good either expecting LBWF to have any knowledge, they barely recognise the true value of printed books, or the wonderful resource that is Vestry House archives. When was the last time a mayor visited, or council leader, or even the cabinet member for the Arts and actually sang its' praises. Labour rubbish the lot.
Several things occur to me - lot of uninformed comment about WW2 records of ordnance dropped by the Germans, some of whom will be related to many of those Nazi's who flew in the planes that dropped the stuff! Let's not forget either the beastly Huns also flew over Britain & London droppingbombs in the First World War too, killing 1400+ innocent civilians. It would do no harm if ALL 2012 visitors to GB were informed of this by the money-grabbing Blue Badge Guides showing people around the sites, instead of waffling on about tidying up a "neglected area".What tosh. All those relocated businesses still waiting for decent compensation to be paid out. A slight correction is needed too for W.O.W. does not cover Leyton, nor is there either a definitive UXB list for Greater London - let alone a single council area. It's no good either expecting LBWF to have any knowledge, they barely recognise the true value of printed books, or the wonderful resource that is Vestry House archives. When was the last time a mayor visited, or council leader, or even the cabinet member for the Arts and actually sang its' praises. Labour rubbish the lot. Redfox
  • Score: 0

8:32pm Thu 15 Mar 12

dukes of hazzard says...

Sam the man! You're a mind reader. Wow. What I said was that this was found near the ice rink which means when they built that, they did not do a proper search back in the 80's when they built it. So easy to blame the Olympic oda but it was the developers of the rink who were likely at fault. Stop being so dramatic about blowing things up. So negative
Sam the man! You're a mind reader. Wow. What I said was that this was found near the ice rink which means when they built that, they did not do a proper search back in the 80's when they built it. So easy to blame the Olympic oda but it was the developers of the rink who were likely at fault. Stop being so dramatic about blowing things up. So negative dukes of hazzard
  • Score: 0

4:27am Fri 16 Mar 12

WCBMI5 says...

“A small Second World War incendiary device, weighing around a kilogram!" Now let's get real - this was a 1Kg German incendiary bomb consisting of a magnesium case that was ignited with a small thermite charge. When the Jerries discovered how easily they could be extinguished they spitely added a small explosive charge that made them dangerous to approach and for a time more effective. In order for the charge to function it was necessary for the bomb to have been ignited.
With something like a million of these bombs there are bound to be many still undiscovered. They are not blockbusters but the date on the bottom end will show how long Adolf had been getting ready to attack us! On the 7th September 1940 we had a good sprinkling most of which were quickly put out but one stuck in a timber stack in Marlborough Road and burnt the whole place down and another fell through the roof of a house in Cleveland Road and lodged behind the rubbish in the boxroom. It couldn't be reached and despite the efforts of firemen from Newmarket the house was lost! Another went through the roof of 154 George Lane and on to the the bed of a young lady who suffered burns to her legs! The bomb was then put out. Later we were treated to the explosive/incendiary type but they did not work quite so well and often misfired! So much for German efficiency!
“A small Second World War incendiary device, weighing around a kilogram!" Now let's get real - this was a 1Kg German incendiary bomb consisting of a magnesium case that was ignited with a small thermite charge. When the Jerries discovered how easily they could be extinguished they spitely added a small explosive charge that made them dangerous to approach and for a time more effective. In order for the charge to function it was necessary for the bomb to have been ignited. With something like a million of these bombs there are bound to be many still undiscovered. They are not blockbusters but the date on the bottom end will show how long Adolf had been getting ready to attack us! On the 7th September 1940 we had a good sprinkling most of which were quickly put out but one stuck in a timber stack in Marlborough Road and burnt the whole place down and another fell through the roof of a house in Cleveland Road and lodged behind the rubbish in the boxroom. It couldn't be reached and despite the efforts of firemen from Newmarket the house was lost! Another went through the roof of 154 George Lane and on to the the bed of a young lady who suffered burns to her legs! The bomb was then put out. Later we were treated to the explosive/incendiary type but they did not work quite so well and often misfired! So much for German efficiency! WCBMI5
  • Score: 0

12:40pm Tue 20 Mar 12

I.Ride says...

Great! bit of history dug up at the games site, Soo whats the big deal? I dont see why there is any reason to be negative about this, or why people are going into history teacher mode. Its a bomb i wouldnt mind finding one probably would make the area more interesting if you could go out bomb hunting!
Great! bit of history dug up at the games site, Soo whats the big deal? I dont see why there is any reason to be negative about this, or why people are going into history teacher mode. Its a bomb i wouldnt mind finding one probably would make the area more interesting if you could go out bomb hunting! I.Ride
  • Score: 0

11:34pm Tue 20 Mar 12

WCBMI5 says...

Unexploded bombs in this area might also remind "I.Ride" that at one time the House of Lords was not infested by useless guttersnipes! The Earl of Suffolk, a UXB expert was killed in the area when defusing a German mine in 1941. The last of many he'd dealt with and for which he was awarded the George Cross! Just remember - he was one of those "useless hereditary peers!"
Unexploded bombs in this area might also remind "I.Ride" that at one time the House of Lords was not infested by useless guttersnipes! The Earl of Suffolk, a UXB expert was killed in the area when defusing a German mine in 1941. The last of many he'd dealt with and for which he was awarded the George Cross! Just remember - he was one of those "useless hereditary peers!" WCBMI5
  • Score: 0

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