Classic literature not stocked by library

Classic literature not stocked by library

Classic literature not stocked by library

First published in Your Views

The million pounds spent on Leyton library must be a boon for people using computers. But for the elderly it's a nightmare, trying to get the lift from downstairs to come up or from the top floor down has been a problem.

On my visit this week the lift was completely out of order. So I was unable to get new books.

On a previous visit when I managed to get to the library via the lift I asked for four books by not unknown authors - Thomas Hardy, John Steinbeck, Howard Spring, Daphne du Maurier. Not one of these was obtainable. What used to be a pleasure is now a complete hazard. 

Doris Leather, Grove Green Road, Leytonstone. 

Comments (2)

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10:46am Tue 17 Jun 14

mdj says...

After two expensive revamps in a few years, this large building now has virtually no books on its ground floor.
This is the library featured recently when local groups found that only Council literature was allowed to be placed on display, which prompted the pretence of a climb-down by the Council.
Many of the functions of this building are now generic council services, and nothing to do with learning, inquiry or leisure. This would be a worthwhile efficiency gain were it not achieved at the cost of the building's intended purpose.
The money spent here is more than the money 'saved' by closing two more libraries in deprived areas, that now have minimal social resources.

This is what happens when a service is managed by bureaucrats with no qualifications in that field, in a council with a strong agenda of information control.
After two expensive revamps in a few years, this large building now has virtually no books on its ground floor. This is the library featured recently when local groups found that only Council literature was allowed to be placed on display, which prompted the pretence of a climb-down by the Council. Many of the functions of this building are now generic council services, and nothing to do with learning, inquiry or leisure. This would be a worthwhile efficiency gain were it not achieved at the cost of the building's intended purpose. The money spent here is more than the money 'saved' by closing two more libraries in deprived areas, that now have minimal social resources. This is what happens when a service is managed by bureaucrats with no qualifications in that field, in a council with a strong agenda of information control. mdj
  • Score: 1

12:01pm Tue 17 Jun 14

Thunderbird4 says...

A bit like Walthamstow library after it was completed: no decent books; mostly Mills and Boon. Shame, because there was plenty of space for the 250,000 books that disappeared and were never seen again - well, not in the library. This council is into "dumb down"; perhaps they want every resident of WF to be as educated and cultured as they are.
A bit like Walthamstow library after it was completed: no decent books; mostly Mills and Boon. Shame, because there was plenty of space for the 250,000 books that disappeared and were never seen again - well, not in the library. This council is into "dumb down"; perhaps they want every resident of WF to be as educated and cultured as they are. Thunderbird4
  • Score: 0

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