EPPING: Teacher died in road crash

East London and West Essex Guardian Series: Jeff Gotting Jeff Gotting

A SCHOOLTEACHER died in a motoring accident when he was hit by a van which forced him into the path of a car, a coroners court has recorded.

Jeff Gotting, 53, of Hillcrest Way, in Epping was riding his Yamaha motorcycle down Epping High Road in September, 2008, when he was hit by a silver Kangoo van as he tried to overtake it near Tower Road.

Witness Graham Domney told Chelmsford Coroners Court he could see Mr Gotting behind his own VW Transporter overtaking traffic.

He said: “I watched him coming in my rear view mirror. He went past my driver's door and it felt like it was quite close to me. As he came past I tried to follow him with my eyes but he was going quicker than my eyes.

“I heard a bang. The next thing I realised he was skidding across the road into the opposite carriageway where there was a green Mondeo coming towards me. You could see the car was breaking hard. The motorcycle ended up under the front of it. I got out of my van and went across to him.

“The guy was lying on the ground with this large scooter on top of him. We just got it off him because it sounded like he had heavy breathing.”

Donna Green was at the wheel of the Ford Mondeo and had been driving her 13-year-old daughter to St John's School, in Tower Road, at the time.

She said: “The traffic was quite heavy. I can remember seeing the bike coming out in the direction towards where I was and I can remember seeing the other van pulling out. I can remember the motorbike being hit.

“I can remember saying to my daughter 'Oh my God' because I knew it was going to happen, but it happened so fast.”

Orazio D'Agostino was driving the silver van which hit Mr Gotting. He was interviewed by Essex Police but no criminal charges have been brought against him.

He told the court: “There was a car in front that was leaving a large gap in front. I don't know what he was doing.

“I moved slightly out. It was just a slight manoeuvre. I was just seeing what was happening. It happened so fast, I didn't expect him to hit me. It was in a flash literally.”

Mr Gotting died in Basildon Hospital two weeks after the crash.

A post mortem gave the cause of death as multiple system failure due to cardiac infarction caused by multiple fractures sustained in the crash.

Coroner Caroline Beasley-Murray recorded a verdict of death by Road Traffic Collision.

Mr Gotting was a governor at St John's School, in Epping, and worked as a special needs teacher in London.

He had a son, Callum, wife Heather, and sister Jackie.

At the time of his death, his family described him as “A nice guy who had lots of friends.”

Comments (2)

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12:45pm Wed 28 Jul 10

Quickexit says...

A really tragic accident. There are a lot of motorbike accidents locally. Part of the reason is the winding forest roads and the negligence of car drivers, but also bikers tend to take risks and don't observe the rules of the road. Weaving in and out of heavy traffic, particularly large vehicles, is highly dangerous. Yet, bikers seem to behave as if they are invincible.

I think the police should be making motorcyclists more aware of the dangers on the roads, perhaps encouraging serious bikers to join clubs that both enhance people's enjoyment and enthusiasm for bikes while promoting sensible driving and making an effort to clamp down on dangerous driving by bikers. I know that perhaps most accidents involving motorcyclists are caused by negligence by car drivers, but bikers are the vulnerable ones and they have to make allowances for others' limitations and poor driving because they will come off the worse.
A really tragic accident. There are a lot of motorbike accidents locally. Part of the reason is the winding forest roads and the negligence of car drivers, but also bikers tend to take risks and don't observe the rules of the road. Weaving in and out of heavy traffic, particularly large vehicles, is highly dangerous. Yet, bikers seem to behave as if they are invincible. I think the police should be making motorcyclists more aware of the dangers on the roads, perhaps encouraging serious bikers to join clubs that both enhance people's enjoyment and enthusiasm for bikes while promoting sensible driving and making an effort to clamp down on dangerous driving by bikers. I know that perhaps most accidents involving motorcyclists are caused by negligence by car drivers, but bikers are the vulnerable ones and they have to make allowances for others' limitations and poor driving because they will come off the worse. Quickexit

2:04pm Wed 28 Jul 10

word of mouth says...

Quickexit wrote:
A really tragic accident. There are a lot of motorbike accidents locally. Part of the reason is the winding forest roads and the negligence of car drivers, but also bikers tend to take risks and don't observe the rules of the road. Weaving in and out of heavy traffic, particularly large vehicles, is highly dangerous. Yet, bikers seem to behave as if they are invincible. I think the police should be making motorcyclists more aware of the dangers on the roads, perhaps encouraging serious bikers to join clubs that both enhance people's enjoyment and enthusiasm for bikes while promoting sensible driving and making an effort to clamp down on dangerous driving by bikers. I know that perhaps most accidents involving motorcyclists are caused by negligence by car drivers, but bikers are the vulnerable ones and they have to make allowances for others' limitations and poor driving because they will come off the worse.
The police, fire service and the county council all encourage bikers to attend courses and join clubs to change the riders attitude on the road.
[quote][p][bold]Quickexit[/bold] wrote: A really tragic accident. There are a lot of motorbike accidents locally. Part of the reason is the winding forest roads and the negligence of car drivers, but also bikers tend to take risks and don't observe the rules of the road. Weaving in and out of heavy traffic, particularly large vehicles, is highly dangerous. Yet, bikers seem to behave as if they are invincible. I think the police should be making motorcyclists more aware of the dangers on the roads, perhaps encouraging serious bikers to join clubs that both enhance people's enjoyment and enthusiasm for bikes while promoting sensible driving and making an effort to clamp down on dangerous driving by bikers. I know that perhaps most accidents involving motorcyclists are caused by negligence by car drivers, but bikers are the vulnerable ones and they have to make allowances for others' limitations and poor driving because they will come off the worse.[/p][/quote]The police, fire service and the county council all encourage bikers to attend courses and join clubs to change the riders attitude on the road. word of mouth

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